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Annual Editions: Anthropology 06

Paperback|May 2006
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$58.99

This twenty-ninth edition of ANNUAL EDITIONS: ANTHROPOLOGY provides convenient, inexpensive access to current articles selected from the best of the public press. Organizational features include: an annotated listing of selected World Wide Web sites; an annotated table of contents; a...


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This twenty-ninth edition of ANNUAL EDITIONS: ANTHROPOLOGY provides convenient, inexpensive access to current articles selected from the best of the public press. Organizational features include: an annotated listing of selected World Wide Web sites; an annotated table of contents; a topic guide; a general introduction; brief overviews for each section; a topical index; and an instructor's resource guide with testing materials. USING ANNUAL EDITIONS IN THE CLASSROOM is offered as a practical guide for instructors. ANNUAL EDITIONS titles are supported by our student website, www.mhcls.com/online.
-Publisher

UNIT 1. Anthropological Perspectives 1.Doing Fieldwork Among the Yanomamo, Napoleon A. Chagnon, from Yanomamo: The Fierce People, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1992 Although an anthropologist's first field experience may involve culture shock, Napoleon Chagnon reports that the long process of participant observation may transform personal hardship and frustration into confident understanding of exotic cultural patterns. 2.Lessons from the Field, George Gmelch, Conformity and Conflict: Readings in Cultural Anthropology, Macalester, 2003 By introducing students to fieldwork, George Gmelch provides them with the best that anthropology has to offeran enriched understanding of other people and cultures along with a glimpse of oneself and what it means to be an American . Fieldwork is a matter of mutual acceptance and mutual economic benefit. 3.Eating Christmas in the Kalahari, Richard Borshay Lee, Natural History, December 1969 Anthropologist Richard Borshay Lee gives an account of the misunderstanding and confusion that often accompany the cross-cultural experience. In this case, he violated a basic principle of the !Kung Bushmen's social relations food sharing. 4.Tricking and Tripping: Fieldwork on Prostitution in the Era of AIDS, Claire E. Sterk, Tricking and Tripping: Prostitution in the Era of AIDS, Social Change Press, 2000 As unique as Claire Sterk's report on prostitution may be, she discusses issues common to anthropologists wherever they do fieldwork : how does one build trusting relationships with informants and what are an anthropologist's ethical obligations toward them? UNIT 2. Culture and Communication 5.Fighting for Our Lives, Deborah Tannen, The Argument Culture, Random House, 1998 In America today, there seems to be a pervasive warlike tone to public dialogue . The prevailing belief is that there are only two sides to an issue and opposition leads to truth. Often, however, an issue is more like a crystal, with many sides, and the truth is in the complex middle, not in the oversimplified extremes . 6."I Can't Even Open My Mouth", Deborah Tannen, I Only Say This Because I Love You, Random House, 2001 Since family members have a long, shared history, what they say in conversationthe messages echo with meanings from the pastthe metamessages . The metamessage may not be spoken, but its meaning may be gleaned from every aspect of context : the way something is said, who is saying it, or the very fact that it is said at all. 7.Shakespeare in the Bush, Laura Bohannan, Natural History, August/September 1966 It is often claimed that great literature has cross-cultural significance. In this article, Laura Bohannan describes the difficulities she encountered and the lessons she learned as she attempted to relate the story of Hamlet to the Tiv of West Africa in their own language . 8.Body Art As Visual Language, Enid Schildkrout, Museum of Natural History Publication for Educators, Winter 2001 As a visual language, body art involves shared symbols, myths and social values . Whether as an expression of individuality or group identity, it says something about who we are and what we want to become. UNIT 3. The Organization of Society and Culture 9.Understanding Eskimo Science, Richard Nelson, Audubon, September/October 1993 The traditional hunters' insights into the world of nature may be different, but they are as extensive and profound as those of modern science. 10.The Inuit Paradox, Patricia Gadsby, Discover, October 2004 The traditional diet of the Far North, with its high-protein, high-fat content, shows that there are no essential foodsonly essential nutrients . 11.Ties that Bind, Peter M. Whiteley, Natural History, November 2004 The Hopi people offer gifts in a much broader range of circumstances than people in Western cultures do, tying individuals and groups to each other and to the realm of the spirits. 12.Too Many Bananas, Not Enough Pineapples, and No Watermelon at All: Three Object Lessons in Living with Reciprocity, David Counts, The Humbled Anthropologist: Tales From the Pacific, Wadsworth Publishing, 1990 Among the lessons to be learned regarding reciprocity is that one may not demand a gift or refuse it. Yet, even without a system of record-keeping or money being involved, there is a long-term balance of mutual benefit. 13.Prehistory of Warfare, Steven A. LeBlanc, Archaeology, May/June 2003 Rather than deny the prevalence of warfare in our past, says the author, anthropology would be better served by asking "why do people go to war?" and "why do they stop fighting?" UNIT 4. Other Families, Other Ways 14.How Many Fathers Are Best for a Child?, Meredith F. Small, Discover, April 2003 The ways in which people view biological paternity says a lot about the power relationships between men and women, the kinds of families they form, and how the human species evolved. 15.When Brothers Share a Wife, Melvyn C. Goldstein, Natural History, March, 1987 While the custom of fraternal polyandry relegated many Tibetan women to spinsterhood, this unusual marriage form promoted personal security and economic well-being for its participants. 16.Adding a Co-Wife, Leanna Wolfe, Loving More Magazine, Fall 1998 After seven years, the author's partner became involved with another woman. By taking her cues from polygynous households in East Africa, she learned how to deal with the disruption by adding a " co-wife ." 17.Death Without Weeping, Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Natural History, October 1989 In the shantytowns of Brazil, the seeming indifference of mothers who allow some of their children to die is a survival strategy geared to circumstances in which only a few may live. 18.Our Babies, Ourselves, Meredith F. Small, Natural History, October 1997 Cross-cultural research in child development shows that parents readily accept their society's prevailing ideology on how babies should be treated, usually because it makes sense in their environmental or social circumstances. 19.Arranging a Marriage in India, Serena Nanda, Stumbling Toward Truth: Anthropologists at Work, Wareland Press, 2000 Arranging a marriage in India is far too serious a business for the young
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PRODUCT DETAIL
  • Catalogue Code 256394
  • Product Code 0073515922
  • EAN 9780073515922
  • Pages 256
  • Department Academic
  • Category Science
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Mcgraw Hill
  • Publication Date May 2006
  • Dimensions 275 x 210 x 13mm
  • Weight 0.256kg

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