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Convicted: An a Crooked Cop

Paperback|Oct 2018
Product Rating: 0

$23.99

:Jameel McGee: " For the next three years not a day went by that I didn't think about my son who I had never seen and the cop who had kept me from him. And for most of those three...


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:Jameel McGee: "For the next three years not a day went by that I didn't think about my son who I had never seen and the cop who had kept me from him. And for most of those three years I promised myself that if I ever saw this cop again, I was going to kill him. I intended to keep that promise."

Andrew Collins: "I watched this angry man march through a crowd, a little boy and another man struggling to keep up with him....The man walked straight up to me, stopped, and stuck out his hand. I took it. "Remember me?" he asked in a tone that sounded more like a threat than a question.
Somehow, a name came to me. 'Jameel McGee,' I replied."

It reads like a gripping crime novel&...except this story really happened.

Racial tensions had long simmered in Benton Harbor, a small city on the eastern shore of Lake Michigan, before the day a white narcotics officer--more focused on arrests than justice-set his sights on an innocent black man. But when officer Andrew Collins framed Jameel McGee for possession of crack cocaine, the surprising result was not a race riot but a transformative journey for both men.

Falsely convicted, McGee spent three years in federal prison. Collins also went to prison a few years later for falsifying police reports. While behind bars, the faith of both men deepened. But the story took its most unexpected turn once they were released--when their lives collided again in a moment brimming with mistrust and anger. The two were on a collision course-not to violence-but forgiveness.

As current as today's headlines, this explosive true story reveals how these radically conflicted men chose to let go of fear and a t

-Publisher

PRODUCT DETAIL
  • Catalogue Code 513449
  • Product Code 9780735290747
  • ISBN 0735290741
  • EAN 9780735290747
  • Pages 224
  • Department General Books
  • Category Biography
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Waterbrook Press
  • Publication Date Oct 2018
  • Sales Rank 54078
  • Dimensions 207 x 140 x 14mm
  • Weight 0.198kg

Andrew Collins

Andrew Collins lives in Michigan and makes joint speaking appearances with homeless services worker Jameel McGee to encourage their message of racial reconciliation. Collins is a licensed pastor ministering to youth as a part of Young Life.

Jameel Zookie McGee

Jameel McGee lives in Michigan and makes speaking appearances to encourage his message of racial reconciliation. He works for Emergency Shelter Services, a program designed to help homeless people find sustainable housing.

Mark A Tabb

Mark Tabb is a New York Times best-selling author who has written and co-written over twenty books, including Mistaken Identity, Not Forgotten, and Running for My Life.

Convicted Hardback
Convicted
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:
Prologue


Andrew


The crowd parted like the Red Sea. At first I could not see what was happening or why the hundreds gathered in Benton Harbor&'s Broadway Park for our church&'s Hoops, Hotdogs, and Hip-Hop Festival moved aside so quickly. But then I saw him. I recognized the face but I had trouble putting a name to it. Whoever he was, he was angry, angry enough that the crowd instinctively cleared a path for him. And he was heading straight toward me.


To be honest, I had expected someone like him, in an apparent rage, to come and find me. This was, after all, the first time I&'d shown my face in the heart of Benton Harbor since my release from federal prison. A couple of people I&'d arrested back when I was a policeman had already found me. I ran into one guy at a mall right before I went to prison. He thanked me for coming clean about what I&'d done because it got him out of jail. The rest of these reunions had come after my release. I ran into people at the grocery store and at gas stations and anywhere I went in the area. Some tried to act tough when they first saw me, but they en