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Not Just Science

Paperback|Sep 2005
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This book argues that it is possible for our study of the natural world to enhance our understanding of God and for our faith to inform and influence our study and application of science. Whether you are a student, someone...


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This book argues that it is possible for our study of the natural world to enhance our understanding of God and for our faith to inform and influence our study and application of science. Whether you are a student, someone employed in the sciences, or simply an interested layperson, Not Just Science will help you develop the crucial skills of critical thinking and reflection about key questions in Christian faith and natural science.The contributors provide a systematic approach to both raising and answering the key questions that emerge at the intersection of faith and various disciplines in the natural sciences. Among the questions addressed are the context, limits, benefits, and practice of science in light of Christian values. Questions of ethics as they relate to various applied sciences are also discussed. The end goal is an informed biblical worldview on both nature and our role in obeying God's mandate to care for his creation.With an honest approach to critical questions, Not
-Publisher

Not Just ScienceCopyright 2005 by E. David Cook and Dorothy F. ChappellRequests for information should be addressed to:Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49530Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication DataNot just science : questions where Christian faith and natural science intersect / Dorothy F. Chappell and E.David Cook, general editors.p. cm.Summary: "A look at some of the questions students should be asking as they study the natural sciencesin relation to the Christian worldview and think critically about God''s creation"-Provided bypublisher.Includes bibliographical references.ISBN-10: 0-310-26383-2 (pbk.)ISBN-13: 978-0-310-26383-21. Religion and science. I. Chappell, Dorothy F., 1947- II. Cook, E. David (Edward David), 1947-BL240.3.N68 2005261.5''5-dc22All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible: New International Version.NIV. Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984 by International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. Allrights reserved.Scripture quotations marked ISV are taken from the International Standard Version of the Bible: New Testament.Copyright 1998 by the ISV Foundation.Scripture quotations marked KJV are taken from the King James Version of the Bible.Scripture quotations marked MSG are taken from THE MESSAGE. Copyright by Eugene H. Peterson 1993,1994, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002. Used by permission of NavPress Publishing Group.Scripture quotations marked TNIV are taken from the Holy Bible, Today''s New International Version. TNIV.Copyright 2002, 2004 by International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved.The website addresses recommended throughout this book are offered as a resource to you. These websites arenot intended in any way to be or imply an endorsement on the part of Zondervan, nor do we vouch for theircontent for the life of this book.All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted inany form or by any means-electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or any other-except for brief quotationsin printed reviews, without the prior permission of the publisher.Interior design by Tracey WalkerPrinted in the United States of America05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 /?DCI/ 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1C H A P T E R 1Many authors have noted the close interaction between Christianity and science.Although the two are often assumed to be in conflict, a more positive relationshipbetween science and faith is evident from their overlapping histories. Thedirect influences of Christian ideas on the success of science are often difficult toassess. However, their mutually supporting roles are evident in history, even whenthey sometimes appear to be in conflict. In fact, the roots of modern science can betraced to early Christian thought, and both science and faith can be seen as historicallyinterrelated efforts to understand the physical universe and its creative source.Are natural science and Christian faith locked in conflict, or is there evidence ofcooperation between the two?Perhaps the most typical view of the relationship between science and faith is oneof conflict or confrontation, even though the emphasis on this "warfare" modelhas greatly diminished at the scholarly level. Historically, the idea of warfarebetween science and Christianity developed during the latter half of the nineteenthcentury with the rise of positivism and evolutionary theories. Before this time, aclose relationship between the two was evident from the number of pioneering scientistswho were Christians and the number of clergymen who participated in scientificactivities. The growing professionalism of science in the nineteenth centuryled to a spirit of competition and confrontation with the religious establishment.The increasing conflict and the formulation of a warfare model were supportedby two influential books. John William Draper published the first edition of hisHistory of the Conflict between Religion
-Publisher

Not Just Science Copyright 2005 by E. David Cook and Dorothy F. Chappell Requests for information should be addressed to: Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49530 Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Not just science : questions where Christian faith and natural science intersect / Dorothy F. Chappell and E. David Cook, general editors. p. cm. Summary: "A look at some of the questions students should be asking as they study the natural sciences in relation to the Christian worldview and think critically about God's creation"-Provided by publisher. Includes bibliographical references. ISBN-10: 0-310-26383-2 (pbk.) ISBN-13: 978-0-310-26383-2 1. Religion and science. I. Chappell, Dorothy F., 1947- II. Cook, E. David (Edward David), 1947- BL240.3.N68 2005 261.5'5-dc22 All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible: New International Version. NIV. Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984 by International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved. Scripture quotations marked ISV are taken from the International Standard Version of the Bible: New Testament. Copyright 1998 by the ISV Foundation. Scripture quotations marked KJV are taken from the King James Version of the Bible. Scripture quotations marked MSG are taken from THE MESSAGE. Copyright by Eugene H. Peterson 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002. Used by permission of NavPress Publishing Group. Scripture quotations marked TNIV are taken from the Holy Bible, Today's New International Version. TNIV. Copyright 2002, 2004 by International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved. The website addresses recommended throughout this book are offered as a resource to you. These websites are not intended in any way to be or imply an endorsement on the part of Zondervan, nor do we vouch for their content for the life of this book. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means-electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or any other-except for brief quotations in printed reviews, without the prior permission of the publisher. Interior design by Tracey Walker Printed in the United States of America 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 /?DCI/ 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 C H A P T E R 1 Many authors have noted the close interaction between Christianity and science. Although the two are often assumed to be in conflict, a more positive relationship between science and faith is evident from their overlapping histories. The direct influences of Christian ideas on the success of science are often difficult to assess. However, their mutually supporting roles are evident in history, even when they sometimes appear to be in conflict. In fact, the roots of modern science can be traced to early Christian thought, and both science and faith can be seen as historically interrelated efforts to understand the physical universe and its creative source. Are natural science and Christian faith locked in conflict, or is there evidence of cooperation between the two? Perhaps the most typical view of the relationship between science and faith is one of conflict or confrontation, even though the emphasis on this "warfare" model has greatly diminished at the scholarly level. Historically, the idea of warfare between science and Christianity developed during the latter half of the nineteenth century with the rise of positivism and evolutionary theories. Before this time, a close relationship between the two was evident from the number of pioneering scientists who were Christians and the number of clergymen who participated in scientific activities. The growing professionalism of science in the nineteenth century led
-Publisher

PRODUCT DETAIL
  • Catalogue Code 233218
  • Product Code 0310263832
  • EAN 9780310263838
  • UPC 025986263836
  • Pages 320
  • Department Academic
  • Category Science
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Zondervan
  • Publication Date Sep 2005
  • Dimensions 231 x 190 x 22mm
  • Weight 0.480kg

Dorothy F Chappell

Dorothy F. Chappell is dean of natural and social sciences and professor of biology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, IL.

David Cook

David is a Presbyterian minister, having served in both Wee Waa and Ashfield. He is a graduate of Sydney Missionary and Bible College (SMBC) and Moore Theological College. Prior to formal studies and pastoral ministry David worked in the Economic Research Department of the Reserve Bank. He is the Director of SMBCs School of Preaching and speaks at Christian conventions throughout Australia and overseas. David lectures in preaching and pastoral subjects. He has recently written Teaching Acts and The unheeded Christ.

  • Contents
  • Foreword...13
  • Introduction...15
  • Dorothy F. Chappell And E. David Cook
  • P A R T O N E
  • Presuppositions
  • 1. How Have Christian Faith And Natural Science Interacted
  • In History?...27
  • Joseph L. Spradley
  • 2. What Are The Philosophical Implications Of Christianity
  • For The Natural Sciences?...48
  • E. David Cook And Robert C. O'connor
  • 3. What Are The Theological Implications For Natural
  • Science?...61
  • Vincent E. Bacote And Stephen R. Spencer
  • 4. How Does Society Interact With Science?...79
  • Dorothy F. Chappell And E. David Cook
  • P A R T T W O
  • Selected Natural Sciences
  • And Mathematics
  • 5. What Do We Learn About The Creator From Astronomy And
  • Cosmology?...97
  • Jennifer J. Wiseman
  • 6. Crucial Questions At The Interface Of Christian Faith And
  • Biological Sciences...109
  • Why Should We Care About The Extinction Of Species?...109
  • Raymond J. Lewis
  • What Are The Limits In Bioengineering?....115
  • E. David Cook
  • What Is The Mind-brain Problem?...119
  • William M. Struthers
  • Is Wellness A Human Body Stewardship Issue?....124
  • Peter H. Walters
  • How Do Scientific Views On Human Origins Relate
  • To The Bible?...129
  • Dean E. Arnold
  • 7. Crucial Questions At The Interface Of Christian Faith
  • And Earth Sciences...141
  • What Is God's Purpose For Natural Disasters?...141
  • Stephen O. Moshier
  • Why Should Christians Be Interested In Geology?...148
  • Ralph Stearley
  • Environmental Stewardship: What Are The Roles For
  • Science And Faith?...158
  • Randy Van Dragt And James A. Clark
  • 8. Crucial Questions At The Interface Of Christian Faith,
  • Mathematical Sciences, And Computer Science....174
  • Whose Idea Was Mathematics?...174
  • Terence H. Perciante
  • How Is God's Creativity Manifested In Computer
  • Science?...183
  • Thomas J. Vandrunen
  • 9. Crucial Questions At The Interface Of Christian Faith And
  • The Physical Sciences...190
  • A. How Does Christianity Influence How To Think
  • About Physics?...190
  • What Are Matter And Energy At The Most
  • Fundamental Level?...190
  • Loren Haarsma
  • B. How Does Christianity Influence How To Think
  • About Chemistry?....208
  • The Creation Of Life: Charting When, Where,
  • And How?...209
  • Larry L. Funck
  • How Does Chemistry Impact Human Society?....223
  • Peter K. Walhout
  • Are Pharmaceutical Drugs Good Or Bad?....228
  • Jennifer L. Busch
  • Is There Meaning Beyond The Biomolecular?...234
  • Greta M. Bryson
  • 10. How Are Technology And Engineering Related
  • To Christianity?...243
  • Should Christians Embrace Technology?...243
  • Peter K. Walhout
  • Does Engineering Contribute To A Better Future?...247
  • Stewart M. Desoto And Gayle E. Ermer
  • 11. Crucial Questions In The Applied Sciences...257
  • How Is Science Applied Across Cultures?...257
  • Paul W. Robinson And Helene Slessarev-jamir
  • What Values And Health-care Priorities Are Expressed
  • In Our Health-care Delivery System?....267
  • June A. Arnold
  • Just Agriculture?...279
  • Robb De Haan And Ron Vos
  • 12. How Should The Christian's Foundational Beliefs Shape
  • The Work Of Scientists?...289
  • E. David Cook
  • Conclusion...297
  • Dorothy F. Chappell And E. David Cook
  • Acknowledgments...301
  • Special Thanks...303
  • The Authors....305

C H A P T E R 1 Many authors have noted the close interaction between Christianity and science. Although the two are often assumed to be in conflict, a more positive relationship between science and faith is evident from their overlapping histories. The direct influences of Christian ideas on the success of science are often difficult to assess. However, their mutually supporting roles are evident in history, even when they sometimes appear to be in conflict. In fact, the roots of modern science can be traced to early Christian thought, and both science and faith can be seen as historically interrelated efforts to understand the physical universe and its creative source. Are natural science and Christian faith locked in conflict, or is there evidence of cooperation between the two? Perhaps the most typical view of the relationship between science and faith is one of conflict or confrontation, even though the emphasis on this 'warfare' model has greatly diminished at the scholarly level. Historically, the idea of warfare between science and Christianity developed during the latter half of the nineteenth century with the rise of positivism and evolutionary theories. Before this time, a close relationship between the two was evident from the number of pioneering scientists who were Christians and the number of clergymen who participated in scientific activities. The growing professionalism of science in the nineteenth century led to a spirit of competition and confrontation with the religious establishment. The increasing conflict and the formulation of a warfare model were supported by two influential books. John William Draper published the first edition of his History of the Conflict between Religion and Science in 1874. Andrew Dickson White published his two-volume History of the Warfare of Science and Theology in Christendom in 1896. Both books had a strongly positivist and antireligious view of history, and both portrayed the natural sciences as the champions of academic freedom and the liberators of humanity from religious oppression. The popular interpretation of Darwinian theory in terms of the 'survival of the fittest' seemed to support this warfare model, with science replacing religious authoritarian claims in the struggle for cultural supremacy. In the first half of the twentieth century, logical positivism claimed victory in the supposed warfare between science and Christianity. The positivist's view was that only empirically verifiable knowledge is valid and that all other kinds of knowledge are opinion and emotion, literally 'non-sense.' Of course, this view itself was not empirically verifiable, but it became the dominant view for nearly fifty years. In the second half of the century, increasing historical analysis of science began to show the close relationship between science and culture and the way science changes with shifting cultural ideas and values. In the twentieth century, certain fundamentalist Christian groups who saw the natural sciences in opposition to a more literal interpretation of the Bible embraced the warfare model. For example, a recent book by Henry Morris, president of the Institute for Creation Research, that attacks the theory of evolution is entitled The Long War against God. The book treats modern evolutionary theory as the continuation of Satan's attempt to dethrone God. At times the popular media assume the conflict view in discussing the relation between science and religion, often concluding that science disproves religion. Do cooperation and convergence offer a legitimate model of understanding issues at the intersection of natural science and Christian faith? A more fruitful and historically accurate approach to the relation between science and Christianity is one of cooperation and convergence rather than confrontation and conflict. This view emphasizes the Augustinian idea that 'all truth is God's truth' and that advances in science should be seen as adding to God's revelation in nature. In such a view, the content of Christian theology will sometimes influence and motivate scientific work, and discoveries in the natural sciences will sometimes clarify and correct Christian thought. Some of the most important features that distinguish modern science from its ancient Greek heritage can be identified in the early centuries of the Christian church, especially in the christological controversies that dominated Christian theology for more than a millennium. Christian ideas have influenced scientific thinking at several points in history. Such ideas are also essential in any attempt to understand science from a Christian perspective. An understanding of the divinity of Christ emerged early in Christian thought, leading to a stronger foundation for theoretical science. Starting from biblical sources, Christian thinkers developed the Greek Logos concept and applied it to Christ as the divine reason and Word of God in the creation of the world. The Logos doctrine together with the doctrine of creation provided a basis for the assumption in science that nature is an ordered cosmos, which is in some degree intelligible to human understanding. It reinforced the growing Christian conviction of the unity of creation, which led to the eventual defeat of the pagan tendency to deify nature and the Greek view of celestial perfection, both of which had hindered the full development of science. The humanity of Christ and its relation to His divinity took longer to work out but was no less important for a Christian understanding of nature. The doctrine of the incarnation reinforced a new appreciation for the dignity of labor, the reality of matter, and the goodness of creation---themes that eventually provided support for the development of experimental science. In the scientific revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, several mediating and sometimes heretical views of Christ were used to explain scientific ideas concerning the unity and vitality of nature. These views also served to motivate the practice of science and its application to social needs. 1. EARLY CHRISTIANITY AND SCIENTIFIC ORDER What did early Christian thought contribute to the acceptance of Greek science and the origins of modern science, and how does modern science differ from Greek science? Did the concept of Logos have anything to do with the acceptance of Greek science? In late antiquity, the rational traditions of Greek science and philosophy were shifting toward ethics and theology, with an increasing emphasis on mysticism and magic. Neoplatonic authors were adding esoteric religious ideas to the Greek emphasis on the unchanging perfection of the celestial realm beyond the moon. Early Christian thinkers began to develop their own intellectual tradition to counter these pagan ideas, leading eventually to a Christian assimilation and development of Greek science. They based their idea of the divinity of Christ on John 1:1--14, where Jesus is revealed as the Logos or 'Word' of God. The Logos concept had a long history in the Greco- Roman world, beginning with Heraclitus in the fifth century BC as the principle of harmony and order in a universe of continual flux. In Stoic teaching, the Logos was the divine power that orders and maintains the cosmos.

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