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A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years

A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years

$35.00

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Christianity has had an incalculable impact on human history, not just spiritual beliefs and the organization of religion, but in politics, war and human society. Diarmaid MacCulloch takes the story of Christianity back to its origins in Judaism and Greek culture a thousand years before Jesus Christ's birth and forward to its expansion in the contemporary world. He explores the ways in which, over three millennia, the cosmic puzzle of God-made-human gave Christianity a constant struggle to find its identity. He shows how the Roman Empire moved from executing Jesus and persecuting his followers to protecting an established Christian Church; how Rome, the city where Christ's foremost apostles Peter and Paul met their deaths, has come to symbolize one version of the Christian Church. He points to the great might-have-been of Christian history, when, in 451, many Christians rejected an Emperor's imposed compromise solution to the Jesus problem and embarked on ventures to make Christianity a religion of Africa and the Far East. He explores Christianity's complicated and often contentious relationship to its parent Judaism and cousin Islam, and tells the story of the sixteenth-century split within Western Christianity which produced Protestantism and a continuing Roman Catholicism.In this book we see how Christianity has changed its mind on vital moral questions, such as the permissibility of warfare and slavery, and we learn how the campaign against slavery not only transformed Christianity but helped turn it into a worldwide faith.

- Publisher

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About "A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years"

Christianity has had an incalculable impact on human history, not just spiritual beliefs and the organization of religion, but in politics, war and human society. Diarmaid MacCulloch takes the story of Christianity back to its origins in Judaism and Greek culture a thousand years before Jesus Christ's birth and forward to its expansion in the contemporary world. He explores the ways in which, over three millennia, the cosmic puzzle of God-made-human gave Christianity a constant struggle to find its identity. He shows how the Roman Empire moved from executing Jesus and persecuting his followers to protecting an established Christian Church; how Rome, the city where Christ's foremost apostles Peter and Paul met their deaths, has come to symbolize one version of the Christian Church. He points to the great might-have-been of Christian history, when, in 451, many Christians rejected an Emperor's imposed compromise solution to the Jesus problem and embarked on ventures to make Christianity a religion of Africa and the Far East. He explores Christianity's complicated and often contentious relationship to its parent Judaism and cousin Islam, and tells the story of the sixteenth-century split within Western Christianity which produced Protestantism and a continuing Roman Catholicism.In this book we see how Christianity has changed its mind on vital moral questions, such as the permissibility of warfare and slavery, and we learn how the campaign against slavery not only transformed Christianity but helped turn it into a worldwide faith.

- Publisher
- Koorong

Christianity, one of the world's great religions, has had an incalculable impact on human history. This book, now the most comprehensive and up to date single volume work in English, describes not only the main ideas and personalities of Christian history, its organisation and spirituality, but how it has changed politics, sex, and human society.
Diarmaid MacCulloch ranges from Palestine in the first century to India in the third, from Damascus to China in the seventh century and from San Francisco to Korea in the twentieth. He is one of the most widely travelled of Christian historians and conveys a sense of place as arrestingly as he does the power of ideas. He presents the development of Christian history differently from any of his predecessors. He shows how, after a semblance of unity in its earliest centuries, the Christian church divided during the next 1400 years into three increasingly distanced parts, of which the western Church was by no means always the most important: he observes that at the end of the first eight centuries of Christian history, Baghdad might have seemed a more likely capital for worldwide Christianity than Rome. This is the first truly global history of Christianity.

- Publisher

Meet the Author

Diarmaid Macculloch

Diarmaid MacCulloch is a Fellow of St. Cross College and Lecturer in Church History in the Theology Faculty at the University of Oxford. He is a distinguished English Reformation scholar, and the author of The Reformation; Thomas Cranmer: a life, The Later reformation in England, 1547-1603 and Christian history: an introduction to the western tradition.-Editorial Review.

Customer Reviews For "A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years"

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1 stars By David, Dec 19 2011
Despite his claims to be a 'friend to the Christians' he carries an anti-Christian bias that is, at times, offensive.  By the author's own admission, this book is written for people who hate Christianity. Two cases in point; his view on the Book of The Revelation is summed up, "The writing and telling of history is bedevilled by two human neuroses: horror at the desperate shapelessness and seeming lack of pattern in events, and regret for a lost golden age, a moment of happiness when all was well. Put these together and you have an urge to create elaborate patterns to make sense of things and to create a situation where the golden age is just waiting to spring to life again."(p 7). In his view on how and when the Pentateuch was written he writes, "There were more laws to come in a period much later than Josiah's reign, but they were likewise back-projected to the time of Moses." (p 61) What historical value there is in a book where the expressions "was probably", "was no doubt", and "perhaps" come up on almost every page, I'm not really sure. There are two ways revisionist history can go; one is to revise history in our favour, the other is for our enemies to revise it in theirs. This book is nowhere near the objective middle ground the author was hoping to achieve. It's certainly fuel for the anti-Semitic/anti-Christian fire if nothing else.
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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 313581
  • Product Code 9780141021898
  • ISBN 0141021896
  • EAN 9780141021898
  • Pages 1216
  • Department Academic
  • Category History
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Penguin Books
  • Publication Date Oct 2010
  • Sales Rank #40573
  • Dimensions 198 x 129 x 53 mm
  • Weight 0.885kg

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