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African Americans and the Bible

Vincent L Wimbush (Ed)

African Americans and the Bible

Vincent L Wimbush (Ed)

$220.00

Hardback
Perhaps no other group of people has been as much formed by biblical texts and tropes as African Americans. From literature and the arts to popular culture and everyday life, the Bible courses through black society and culture, like the Mississippi through the American heartland. Despite the enormous recent interest in African American religion, relatively little attention has been paid to the diversity of ways in which African Americans have utilized the Bible.^African Americans and the Bible is the fruit of a four-year collaborative research project directed by Vincent L. Wimbush and funded by the Lilly Endowment. It brings together scholars and experts (sixty-eight in all) from a wide range of academic and artistic fields and disciplines -- including ethnography, cultural history, and biblical studies and also music, film, dance, drama, and literature.^The focus is on the complex interaction between the people known as African Americans and that complex of rhetorics, visions, and ideologies known as the Bible. As such, the book is less about the meaning(s) of the Bible than about the Bible and meaning(s), less about the world(s) of the Bible than about how worlds and the Bible interact -- in short, about how a text constructs a people and a people constructs a text. It is about a particular socio-cultural formation but also about the dynamics that obtain in the interrelation between any group of people and sacred texts in general. Thus African Americans and the Bible provides an exemplum of socio-cultural formation and a critical lens through which the process of socio-cultural formation can be viewed.

- Publisher James Abbington is assistant professor of Music, Shaw University, Raleigh, North Carolina Efrain Agosto is professor of New Testament and director, Programa de Ministerios Hispanos, Hartford Seminary, Connecticut David Asomaning is a practicing psychotherapist and is a Ph.D. candidate in Psychiatry and Religion, Union Theological Seminary, New York Barbara Austin-Lucas is associate dean, New York Theological Seminary, and assistant minister, Bridge Street AME Church, Brooklyn, New York Hans A. Baer is professor, department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Little Rock Randall C. Bailey is Andrew Mellon Professor of Hebrew Bible at the Interdenominational Theological Center, Atlanta Randall Balmer is Ann Whitney Olin professor of Religion at Barnard College, New York Roderick Belin is a Master of Divinity graduate of Union Theological Seminary and an ordained AME minister, Queens, New York Horace Boyer is professor of Music Theory and African American Music, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, retired Mellonee Burnim is associate professor of Afro-American Studies, Indiana University at Bloomington Marie Case is a Ph.D. student in New Testament and Christian Origins, Union Theological Seminary, New York Elizabeth A. Castelli is assistant professor of Religion, Barnard College Charise Cheney is assistant professor of Ethnic Studies, California State University, San Luis Obispo Yvonne Chireau is assistant professor of Religion, Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania Cecile Coquet is assistant professor, American History and Literature, University of Provence (Aix-Marseille 1), France Cyprian Davis, OSB, is professor of Church History, St. Meinrad School of Theology and Archabbey, Indiana Victoria Erickson is associate professor of Sociology of religion and chaplain, Drew University V. P. Franklin is the Rosa and Charles Keller Professor of Arts and Humanities at Xavier University of Louisiana Cheryl Townsend Gilkes is John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur associate professor of sociology and professor of African American studies, Colby College Keith Gilyard is professor of English, Pennsylvania State University Michael Gomez is professor of History, New York University Farah J. Griffin is assistant professor of English, University of Pennsylvania Grey Gundaker is assistant professor of Anthropology, College of William and Mary Lenton Gunn, Jr., is senior minister, St. James Presbyterian Church, Harlem, New York Vincent Harding is professor of Religion and Social Transformation, Iliff School of Theology, Denver Leonard Harris is professor of Philosophy and director, African American Studies and Research Center, Purdue University Chanta M. Haywood is assistant professor of English, Florida State University, Tallahassee Barbara Holdrege is associate professor of Religious Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara James Ella James is executive committeewoman and California state convener of the board of the National Council of Negro Women, and an ordained deacon, McGee Avenue Baptist Church, Berkeley, California Leslie King-Hammond is dean of Graduate Studies, Maryland Institute College of Art Cheryl Kirk-Duggan is assistant professor and director, Center for Women and Religion, Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley Velma Love is a Ph.D. student in Bible and Culture at Union Theological Seminary, New York Charles Mabee is professor of Old Testament, Ecumenical Theological Seminary, Detroit Albert G. Miller is associate professor of Religion, Oberlin College, Ohio Keith D. Miller is associate professor of English, Arizona State University Maxine L. Montgomery is associate professor of English, Florida State University, Tallahassee Moses N. Moore is associate professor of American and African-American Religions, Arizona State University Alfred Muhammed is a graduate student in Islamic studies and Muslim-Christian relations, Hartford Seminary, and Imam in the Muslim American Society, New York City Nathaniel S. Murrell is assistant professor, department of Religion and Philosophy, North Carolina State University at Wilmington Jacob Olupona is professor of African American and African Studies and director, Religious studies Program, University of California, Davis Kofi Asare Opoku is visiting professor of Religion, Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania Colin Palmer is Distinguished professor of History, CUNY Graduate Center, New York City Fayth M. Parks is staff therapist, Counseling and Human Development Center, University of South Carolina, Columbia Linda M. Perkins is associate professor, Educational Foundations, Hunter College Carla L. Peterson is professor of English and Comparative Literature, University of Maryland, College Park Richard J. Powell is John Spencer Bassett professor of Art History, Duke University Phillip Richards is associate professor of English, Colgate University Sandra Richards is professor of African American studies and theater, Northwestern University Ida Rousseau Mukenge is professor of Sociology, Morehouse College John D. Saillant is associate professor, English and American Studies, Western Michigan State University, Kalamazoo Cheryl J. Sanders is professor of Christian Ethics, Howard University School of Divinity Barbara Savage is assistant professor of History, University of Pennsylvania Milton Sernett is professor of African American Studies, Syracuse University James Shopshire is professor of Sociology of Religion and Urban Ministry, Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, D.C. Abraham Smith is associate professor of New Testament, Andover Newton Theological School, Massachusetts R. Drew Smith is scholar-in-residence, Morehouse College Leadership Center Theophus Smith is associate professor, Religious Studies, Emory University, Atlanta Sterling Stuckey is professor of History, University of California, Riverside Hal Taussig is professor of Biblical Studies at Chestnut Hill College and Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, and pastor of Chestnut Hill United Methodist Church, Philadelphia Traki Taylor is assistant professor, School of Education, University of Michigan at Flint. Richard B. Turner is associate professor, Religious Studies, DePaul University, Chicago Margaret Washington is professor of History, Cornell University Judith Weisenfeld is associate professor of Religious Studies, Vassar College Lynne Westfield is assistant professor of Religious Education, Drew University Kathleen O'Brien Wicker is Mary W. Johnson and J. Stanley Johnson professor in the Humanities, Scripps College, California Gosnell Yorke is Translation consultant, United Bible Societies (Africa Region), South Africa Vincent L. Wimbush is professor of New Testament and Christian Origins, Union Theological Seminary, and adjunct professor, Religion department, Columbia University Rosamond C. Rodman is a Ph.D. candidate, Religion department, Columbia University

- Publisher A unique study of how the Bible "constructs" African Americans and how African Americans "construct" the bibleFrom literature and the arts to popular culture and everyday life, the Bible courses through black society and culture. Despite the enormous recent surge of interest in African American religion, scant attention has been paid to the diversity of ways in which African Americans have utilized the Bible. African Americans and the Bible is the fruit of a four-year collaborative research project directed by Vincent L. Wimbush and funded by the Lilly Endowment. It brings together scholars and experts (sixty-eight in all) from a wide range of academic and artistic fields and disciplines-including ethnography, cultural history, and biblical studies and also music, film, dance, drama, and literature. The book is less about the meaning(s) of the Bible than about the Bible and meaning(s), less about the world(s) of the Bible than about how worlds and the Bible interact-in short, about how a text constructs a people and a people construct a text. It is about a particular socio-cultural formation but also about the dynamics that occur in the interrelation between any group of people and sacred texts in general. African Americans and the Bible offers a critical lens through which the process of socio-cultural formation can be viewed.

- Publisher

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About "African Americans and the Bible"

Perhaps no other group of people has been as much formed by biblical texts and tropes as African Americans. From literature and the arts to popular culture and everyday life, the Bible courses through black society and culture, like the Mississippi through the American heartland. Despite the enormous recent interest in African American religion, relatively little attention has been paid to the diversity of ways in which African Americans have utilized the Bible.^African Americans and the Bible is the fruit of a four-year collaborative research project directed by Vincent L. Wimbush and funded by the Lilly Endowment. It brings together scholars and experts (sixty-eight in all) from a wide range of academic and artistic fields and disciplines -- including ethnography, cultural history, and biblical studies and also music, film, dance, drama, and literature.^The focus is on the complex interaction between the people known as African Americans and that complex of rhetorics, visions, and ideologies known as the Bible. As such, the book is less about the meaning(s) of the Bible than about the Bible and meaning(s), less about the world(s) of the Bible than about how worlds and the Bible interact -- in short, about how a text constructs a people and a people constructs a text. It is about a particular socio-cultural formation but also about the dynamics that obtain in the interrelation between any group of people and sacred texts in general. Thus African Americans and the Bible provides an exemplum of socio-cultural formation and a critical lens through which the process of socio-cultural formation can be viewed.
- Publisher

James Abbington is assistant professor of Music, Shaw University, Raleigh, North Carolina Efrain Agosto is professor of New Testament and director, Programa de Ministerios Hispanos, Hartford Seminary, Connecticut David Asomaning is a practicing psychotherapist and is a Ph.D. candidate in Psychiatry and Religion, Union Theological Seminary, New York Barbara Austin-Lucas is associate dean, New York Theological Seminary, and assistant minister, Bridge Street AME Church, Brooklyn, New York Hans A. Baer is professor, department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Arkansas, Little Rock Randall C. Bailey is Andrew Mellon Professor of Hebrew Bible at the Interdenominational Theological Center, Atlanta Randall Balmer is Ann Whitney Olin professor of Religion at Barnard College, New York Roderick Belin is a Master of Divinity graduate of Union Theological Seminary and an ordained AME minister, Queens, New York Horace Boyer is professor of Music Theory and African American Music, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, retired Mellonee Burnim is associate professor of Afro-American Studies, Indiana University at Bloomington Marie Case is a Ph.D. student in New Testament and Christian Origins, Union Theological Seminary, New York Elizabeth A. Castelli is assistant professor of Religion, Barnard College Charise Cheney is assistant professor of Ethnic Studies, California State University, San Luis Obispo Yvonne Chireau is assistant professor of Religion, Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania Cecile Coquet is assistant professor, American History and Literature, University of Provence (Aix-Marseille 1), France Cyprian Davis, OSB, is professor of Church History, St. Meinrad School of Theology and Archabbey, Indiana Victoria Erickson is associate professor of Sociology of religion and chaplain, Drew University V. P. Franklin is the Rosa and Charles Keller Professor of Arts and Humanities at Xavier University of Louisiana Cheryl Townsend Gilkes is John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur associate professor of sociology and professor of African American studies, Colby College Keith Gilyard is professor of English, Pennsylvania State University Michael Gomez is professor of History, New York University Farah J. Griffin is assistant professor of English, University of Pennsylvania Grey Gundaker is assistant professor of Anthropology, College of William and Mary Lenton Gunn, Jr., is senior minister, St. James Presbyterian Church, Harlem, New York Vincent Harding is professor of Religion and Social Transformation, Iliff School of Theology, Denver Leonard Harris is professor of Philosophy and director, African American Studies and Research Center, Purdue University Chanta M. Haywood is assistant professor of English, Florida State University, Tallahassee Barbara Holdrege is associate professor of Religious Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara James Ella James is executive committeewoman and California state convener of the board of the National Council of Negro Women, and an ordained deacon, McGee Avenue Baptist Church, Berkeley, California Leslie King-Hammond is dean of Graduate Studies, Maryland Institute College of Art Cheryl Kirk-Duggan is assistant professor and director, Center for Women and Religion, Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley Velma Love is a Ph.D. student in Bible and Culture at Union Theological Seminary, New York Charles Mabee is professor of Old Testament, Ecumenical Theological Seminary, Detroit Albert G. Miller is associate professor of Religion, Oberlin College, Ohio Keith D. Miller is associate professor of English, Arizona State University Maxine L. Montgomery is associate professor of English, Florida State University, Tallahassee Moses N. Moore is associate professor of American and African-American Religions, Arizona State University Alfred Muhammed is a graduate student in Islamic studies and Muslim-Christian relations, Hartford Seminary, and Imam in the Muslim American Society, New York City Nathaniel S. Murrell is assistant professor, department of Religion and Philosophy, North Carolina State University at Wilmington Jacob Olupona is professor of African American and African Studies and director, Religious studies Program, University of California, Davis Kofi Asare Opoku is visiting professor of Religion, Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania Colin Palmer is Distinguished professor of History, CUNY Graduate Center, New York City Fayth M. Parks is staff therapist, Counseling and Human Development Center, University of South Carolina, Columbia Linda M. Perkins is associate professor, Educational Foundations, Hunter College Carla L. Peterson is professor of English and Comparative Literature, University of Maryland, College Park Richard J. Powell is John Spencer Bassett professor of Art History, Duke University Phillip Richards is associate professor of English, Colgate University Sandra Richards is professor of African American studies and theater, Northwestern University Ida Rousseau Mukenge is professor of Sociology, Morehouse College John D. Saillant is associate professor, English and American Studies, Western Michigan State University, Kalamazoo Cheryl J. Sanders is professor of Christian Ethics, Howard University School of Divinity Barbara Savage is assistant professor of History, University of Pennsylvania Milton Sernett is professor of African American Studies, Syracuse University James Shopshire is professor of Sociology of Religion and Urban Ministry, Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, D.C. Abraham Smith is associate professor of New Testament, Andover Newton Theological School, Massachusetts R. Drew Smith is scholar-in-residence, Morehouse College Leadership Center Theophus Smith is associate professor, Religious Studies, Emory University, Atlanta Sterling Stuckey is professor of History, University of California, Riverside Hal Taussig is professor of Biblical Studies at Chestnut Hill College and Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, and pastor of Chestnut Hill United Methodist Church, Philadelphia Traki Taylor is assistant professor, School of Education, University of Michigan at Flint. Richard B. Turner is associate professor, Religious Studies, DePaul University, Chicago Margaret Washington is professor of History, Cornell University Judith Weisenfeld is associate professor of Religious Studies, Vassar College Lynne Westfield is assistant professor of Religious Education, Drew University Kathleen O'Brien Wicker is Mary W. Johnson and J. Stanley Johnson professor in the Humanities, Scripps College, California Gosnell Yorke is Translation consultant, United Bible Societies (Africa Region), South Africa Vincent L. Wimbush is professor of New Testament and Christian Origins, Union Theological Seminary, and adjunct professor, Religion department, Columbia University Rosamond C. Rodman is a Ph.D. candidate, Religion department, Columbia University
- Publisher

A unique study of how the Bible "constructs" African Americans and how African Americans "construct" the bibleFrom literature and the arts to popular culture and everyday life, the Bible courses through black society and culture. Despite the enormous recent surge of interest in African American religion, scant attention has been paid to the diversity of ways in which African Americans have utilized the Bible. African Americans and the Bible is the fruit of a four-year collaborative research project directed by Vincent L. Wimbush and funded by the Lilly Endowment. It brings together scholars and experts (sixty-eight in all) from a wide range of academic and artistic fields and disciplines-including ethnography, cultural history, and biblical studies and also music, film, dance, drama, and literature. The book is less about the meaning(s) of the Bible than about the Bible and meaning(s), less about the world(s) of the Bible than about how worlds and the Bible interact-in short, about how a text constructs a people and a people construct a text. It is about a particular socio-cultural formation but also about the dynamics that occur in the interrelation between any group of people and sacred texts in general. African Americans and the Bible offers a critical lens through which the process of socio-cultural formation can be viewed.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Vincent L Wimbush (Ed)

Wimbush is professor of New Testatment and Christian Origins at Union Theological Seminary, New York.

Table Of Contents

  • Pre-texts: The Study Of The Bible As Ethnography
  • The Study Of The Bible As Socio-cultural Hermeneutics
  • The Study Of The Bible As Cultural-historical Reality. Con-texts: Flight,
  • Or Cultural De-formation And Discovery Of The Self-in-marronage
  • Settlement, Or Formation Of The Self-and-worlds-in-marronage
  • Negotiation, Or Re-for(ul)ation From The Site Of Marronage. Subtexts:
  • "it's Not Just A Church Thing"
  • "it's Not Just A Christian Thing"
  • "it's Not Just A Black Thing"
  • "it's Not Just An American Thing"
  • "some Things About It Are Disturbing"
  • "it's How Women Read Themselves And The World"
  • "it's Not A Change Of Colour But A Whole Change Of Subject Kind Of
  • Thing".

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