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Being Israeli

Gershon ShafirYoav Peled

Being Israeli

Gershon ShafirYoav Peled

$80.99

Paperback
1. Introduction; Part I. Fragmented Citizenship in a Colonial Frontier Society: 2. The virtues of Ashkenazi pioneering; 3. Mizrachim and women: between quality and quantity; 4. The frontier within: Palestinians as second-class citizens; 5. The wages of legitimation: Zionist and non-Zionist Orthodox Jews; Part II. The Frontier Reopens: 6. New day on the frontier; 7. The frontier erupts: the Intitfadas; Part III. The Emergence of Civil Society: 8. Agents of political change; 9. Economic liberalization and peacemaking; 10. The 'Constitutional Revolution'; 11. Shrinking social rights; 12. Emergent citizenship groups? Immigrants from the FSU and Ethiopia and overseas foreign workers; 13. Conclusion.

- Publisher A timely study by two well-known scholars offers a theoretically informed account of the political sociology of Israel. The analysis is set within its historical context as the authors trace Israel's development from Zionist settlement in the 1880s, through the establishment of the state in 1948, to the present day. Against this background the authors speculate on the relationship between identity and citizenship in Israeli society, and consider the differential rights, duties and privileges that are accorded different social strata. In this way they demonstrate that, despite ongoing tensions, the pressure of globalization and economic liberalization has gradually transformed Israel from a frontier society to one more oriented towards peace and private profit. This unexpected conclusion offers some encouragement for the future of this troubled region. However, Israel's position towards the peace process is still subject to a tug-of-war between two conceptions of citizenship: liberal citizenship on the one hand, and a combination of the remnants of republican citizenship associated with the colonial settlement with an ever more religiously defined ethno-nationalist citizenship, on the other.

- Publisher

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About "Being Israeli"

1. Introduction; Part I. Fragmented Citizenship in a Colonial Frontier Society: 2. The virtues of Ashkenazi pioneering; 3. Mizrachim and women: between quality and quantity; 4. The frontier within: Palestinians as second-class citizens; 5. The wages of legitimation: Zionist and non-Zionist Orthodox Jews; Part II. The Frontier Reopens: 6. New day on the frontier; 7. The frontier erupts: the Intitfadas; Part III. The Emergence of Civil Society: 8. Agents of political change; 9. Economic liberalization and peacemaking; 10. The 'Constitutional Revolution'; 11. Shrinking social rights; 12. Emergent citizenship groups? Immigrants from the FSU and Ethiopia and overseas foreign workers; 13. Conclusion.
- Publisher

A timely study by two well-known scholars offers a theoretically informed account of the political sociology of Israel. The analysis is set within its historical context as the authors trace Israel's development from Zionist settlement in the 1880s, through the establishment of the state in 1948, to the present day. Against this background the authors speculate on the relationship between identity and citizenship in Israeli society, and consider the differential rights, duties and privileges that are accorded different social strata. In this way they demonstrate that, despite ongoing tensions, the pressure of globalization and economic liberalization has gradually transformed Israel from a frontier society to one more oriented towards peace and private profit. This unexpected conclusion offers some encouragement for the future of this troubled region. However, Israel's position towards the peace process is still subject to a tug-of-war between two conceptions of citizenship: liberal citizenship on the one hand, and a combination of the remnants of republican citizenship associated with the colonial settlement with an ever more religiously defined ethno-nationalist citizenship, on the other.
- Publisher

Meet the Authors

Gershon Shafir

Gershon Shafir is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, San Diego. His publications include Land, Labor, and the Origins of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, 1882–1914 (1989, 1996) and Immigrants and Nationalists (1995). He is the editor of The Citizenship Debates (1998). Yoav Peled is lecturer in the Department of Political Science, Tel Aviv University. His book, Class and Ethnicity in the Pale: The Political Economy of Jewish Workers' Nationalism in Late Imperial Russia, was published in 1989 and he edited Ethnic Challenges to the Modern Nation-State (2000). Both authors have co-edited The New Israel: Peacemaking and Liberalization (2000).

Yoav Peled

Peled is Senior Lecturer in Political Science at Tel-Aviv University.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 179314
  • Product Code 0521796725
  • EAN 9780521796729
  • Pages 412
  • Department Academic
  • Category Christian Worldview
  • Sub-Category World Events
  • Publisher Cambridge University Uk
  • Publication Date Feb 2002
  • Dimensions 225 x 151 x 12 mm
  • Weight 0.648kg

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