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Berit Olam:1 Kings

Jerome WalshDavid W Cotter (Ed)

Berit Olam:1 Kings

Jerome WalshDavid W Cotter (Ed)

$83.30

Hardback
For centuries, people have turned to the Hebrew Bible to hear the ^life-giving words of God's everlasting covenant. "Berit Olam (The ^Everlasting Covenant): Studies in Hebrew Narrative and Poetry" shares ^this message with lay people, professional biblical scholars, preachers, ^students and religious educators.^This multi-volume commentary series reflects the latest developments in a ^new method of biblical study literary criticism. The authors approach the ^books of the Hebrew Bible as literary works, recognizing that their poetry ^and stories can be better appreciated by first understanding their ancient ^Hebrew forms.^The authors comment primarily on the New Revised Standard Version of the ^Bible, although they refer to others or provide new translations of words ^or phrases when necessary to clarify the text's meaning. The volumes in ^"Berit Olam" contain commentary only^the complete biblical text is not included.^The narratives of Solomon and Jeoboam, of Elijah and Ahab, have been read ^for hundreds of years. Even apart from questions of historical ^authenticity, the stories tell a complex tale of God's dealings with ^Israel. This study explores the narrative world created by 1 Kings' ^ancient Israelite author: the people who inhabit it, the lives they live, ^the deeds they do, and the face of God who is revealed in their stories.^An introduction explains the significance of 1 Kings as a historical ^narrative. Originally intended as a literal history, after centuries of ^writing and re-writing it is now as much a literary work as an historical ^one: the views of those who formed it can be discerned and studied. The ^author also explains how the traditions of Hebrew prose narrative - and ^the Hebrew language itself - affect the reading of 1 Kings.

- Publisher 416 Pages

- Publisher The narratives of Solomon and Jeroboam, of Elijah and Ahab, have fascinated readers for millennia. They are the principal foundation of our knowledge of the history of Israel during the early years of the divided monarchy, and their reliability and verifiability as historical sources have long been the subject of intense scholarly analysis and debate. But even apart from questions of historical authenticity, they are gripping stories of richly drawn characters caught up in the complex tale of Yahweh's dealings with Israel: Solomon the wise is the builder of Yahweh's Temple, yet he becomes an idolater; Jeroboam is chosen by Yahweh as king, yet he worships the golden calves; Elijah is a prophet second only to Moses, yet he tries to renounce his calling; and Ahab is the worst of Israel's kings, yet shows traces of greatness. This study explores the narrative world created by the ancient Israelite author - the people who inhabit it, the lives they live and the deeds they do, and the face of God who is revealed in their stories.

- Publisher

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About "Berit Olam:1 Kings"

For centuries, people have turned to the Hebrew Bible to hear the ^life-giving words of God's everlasting covenant. "Berit Olam (The ^Everlasting Covenant): Studies in Hebrew Narrative and Poetry" shares ^this message with lay people, professional biblical scholars, preachers, ^students and religious educators.^This multi-volume commentary series reflects the latest developments in a ^new method of biblical study literary criticism. The authors approach the ^books of the Hebrew Bible as literary works, recognizing that their poetry ^and stories can be better appreciated by first understanding their ancient ^Hebrew forms.^The authors comment primarily on the New Revised Standard Version of the ^Bible, although they refer to others or provide new translations of words ^or phrases when necessary to clarify the text's meaning. The volumes in ^"Berit Olam" contain commentary only^the complete biblical text is not included.^The narratives of Solomon and Jeoboam, of Elijah and Ahab, have been read ^for hundreds of years. Even apart from questions of historical ^authenticity, the stories tell a complex tale of God's dealings with ^Israel. This study explores the narrative world created by 1 Kings' ^ancient Israelite author: the people who inhabit it, the lives they live, ^the deeds they do, and the face of God who is revealed in their stories.^An introduction explains the significance of 1 Kings as a historical ^narrative. Originally intended as a literal history, after centuries of ^writing and re-writing it is now as much a literary work as an historical ^one: the views of those who formed it can be discerned and studied. The ^author also explains how the traditions of Hebrew prose narrative - and ^the Hebrew language itself - affect the reading of 1 Kings.
- Publisher

416 Pages
- Publisher

The narratives of Solomon and Jeroboam, of Elijah and Ahab, have fascinated readers for millennia. They are the principal foundation of our knowledge of the history of Israel during the early years of the divided monarchy, and their reliability and verifiability as historical sources have long been the subject of intense scholarly analysis and debate. But even apart from questions of historical authenticity, they are gripping stories of richly drawn characters caught up in the complex tale of Yahweh's dealings with Israel: Solomon the wise is the builder of Yahweh's Temple, yet he becomes an idolater; Jeroboam is chosen by Yahweh as king, yet he worships the golden calves; Elijah is a prophet second only to Moses, yet he tries to renounce his calling; and Ahab is the worst of Israel's kings, yet shows traces of greatness. This study explores the narrative world created by the ancient Israelite author - the people who inhabit it, the lives they live and the deeds they do, and the face of God who is revealed in their stories.
- Publisher

Meet the Authors

Jerome Walsh

Jerome T. Walsh taught Old Testament at the University of BoJerome T. Walsh taught Old Testament at the University of Botswana and the University of Dallas, and has written severaltswana and the University of Dallas, and has written several books on Old Testament narrative. books on Old Testament narrative.

David W Cotter (Ed)

Cotter is a monk of St. John's Abbey and an editor at The Liturgical Press.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 117973
  • Product Code 0814650449
  • EAN 9780814650448
  • Pages 416
  • Department Academic
  • Category Old Testament Commentaries
  • Sub-Category 1 Kings
  • Publisher Liturgical Press
  • Publication Date Feb 1996
  • Dimensions 229 x 152 x 36 mm
  • Weight 0.907kg

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