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Blink of An Eye

Ted Dekker
Blink of An Eye
sneak Peek

Blink of An Eye

Ted Dekker

$19.99

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The future changes in the Blink of an Eye . . . or does it? ^Miriam is a Saudi princess promised to another, a pawn in a political struggle that could shift the balance of power in the Middle East. ^Seth is a certified genius with a head full of numbers, a life full of baggage, and an attitude born on the waves of the Pacific. ^Cultures collide when they find themselves thrown together as fugitives in a high-stakes chase across Southern California. A growing attraction and a search for answers fuel their fight to survive . . . but with no sleep and a massive manhunt steadily closing in, their chances of surviving any future are razor thin.

- Publisher Seth Borders has one of the world's highest IQs. Now he's suddenly struck by an incredible power--the ability to see multiple potential futures--and he stumbles upon Miriam, a beautiful Saudi Arabian princess who has fled to escape a forced marriage. Cultures collide as Seth and Miriam are thrown together and forced to run from forces determined to kidnap or kill Miriam. An intoxicating tale set amidst the shifting sands of the Middle East and the back roads of America, Blink engages issues as ancient as the earth itself . . . and as current as today's headlines.

- Publisher Chapter One Miriam swept the purple velvet drape to one side and gazed through the window to the courtyard. The marble palace had been completed just last year and was easily the grandest of her father's residences. She hadn't visited all of them, but she didn't need to. Prince Salman bin Fahd had four wives, and he'd built each of them three palaces, two in Riyadh, and one in Jidda. All four wives had identical dwellings in each location, although to say his wives had the palaces was misleading. Father had the palaces, and he had wives for each. This, Salman's thirteenth palace, he'd built solely for special events such as today's, the wedding of Sita, one of Miriam's closest friends. Outside, the sun glinted off a spewing fountain in the center of a large pond. Bright red petals from two hundred dozen roses flown in from Holland blanketed the water. Evidently the groom, Hatam bin Hazat, had heard that his young bride liked red roses. Upon seeing the extravagant display two days earlier, Sita vowed never to look upon another red rose in her life. Dozens of Filipino servants crossed the lawn, carrying silver trays stacked high with every imaginable food, prepared by eighteen chefs brought in from Egypt. Roast almond duck, curried beef rolled in lamb flanks, liver-stuffed lobster--Miriam had never seen such an extravagant display. And this for the women only. As at many Saudi weddings, the male guests would never actually see the women. Custom required two separate ceremonies for the simple reason that women attended weddings unveiled. The traditional path of the Wahhabi sect forbade a man from seeing the face of a woman unless she was a family member or tied closely to his family. Sounds of music and drums and gaiety drifted through the window. The world mistook the prevailing cultural practices in the Arabian Peninsula as unfair to women, Miriam often thought. She'd studied at the University of Berkeley in California for three months two summers ago and had first heard there the misconception that a Saudi woman dies three times during her span on earth. It was said that she dies on the day of her first menses, when she is forced to don the black veil and slip into obscurity; she dies on the day of her wedding, when she is given as a possession to a stranger; and she dies when she finally passes on. She'd been tempted to slap the woman who uttered the words. Perhaps if the Americans knew Saudi history better, they would hold their tongues. True enough, a woman was traditionally forbidden from some of the activities accepted by the West--driving, for example. Or giving testimony in a dispute. Or walking about freely with her face uncovered. But all of these practices advanced Saudi culture in ways the West did not see. Saudis understood the value of strong families, for example. Of loyalty to God and his word. Of respect for an order that supported both families and God. Miriam let her mind drift over the events that had placed her and her friend Sita here, in this magnificent palace, where they awaited the ceremony that would change Sita's life as she knew it. The kingdom's first king, Abdul Aziz ibn Saud, conquered Riyadh in 1902. He was in his early twenties then. The four kings who had ruled since his death in 1953 were all his sons. But when Miriam looked down history's foggy halls, she decided it was the first king's women, not his sons, who shaped the country. He'd taken over three hundred wives, and it was these women who gave him so many sons. "I can't believe it's actually happening," Sita said from the sofa. Miriam let the curtain fall back in place and turned around. Sita sat like a small doll dressed in lace and pink. At weddings, all the women, from bride to servants, shed their black abaayas and veils for colorful dresses. Her eyes were round and dark--so very insecure. Miriam and Sultana had rescued Sita from a floc

- Publisher
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About "Blink of An Eye"

The future changes in the Blink of an Eye . . . or does it? ^Miriam is a Saudi princess promised to another, a pawn in a political struggle that could shift the balance of power in the Middle East. ^Seth is a certified genius with a head full of numbers, a life full of baggage, and an attitude born on the waves of the Pacific. ^Cultures collide when they find themselves thrown together as fugitives in a high-stakes chase across Southern California. A growing attraction and a search for answers fuel their fight to survive . . . but with no sleep and a massive manhunt steadily closing in, their chances of surviving any future are razor thin.
- Publisher

Seth Borders has one of the world's highest IQs. Now he's suddenly struck by an incredible power--the ability to see multiple potential futures--and he stumbles upon Miriam, a beautiful Saudi Arabian princess who has fled to escape a forced marriage. Cultures collide as Seth and Miriam are thrown together and forced to run from forces determined to kidnap or kill Miriam. An intoxicating tale set amidst the shifting sands of the Middle East and the back roads of America, Blink engages issues as ancient as the earth itself . . . and as current as today's headlines.
- Publisher

Chapter One Miriam swept the purple velvet drape to one side and gazed through the window to the courtyard. The marble palace had been completed just last year and was easily the grandest of her father's residences. She hadn't visited all of them, but she didn't need to. Prince Salman bin Fahd had four wives, and he'd built each of them three palaces, two in Riyadh, and one in Jidda. All four wives had identical dwellings in each location, although to say his wives had the palaces was misleading. Father had the palaces, and he had wives for each. This, Salman's thirteenth palace, he'd built solely for special events such as today's, the wedding of Sita, one of Miriam's closest friends. Outside, the sun glinted off a spewing fountain in the center of a large pond. Bright red petals from two hundred dozen roses flown in from Holland blanketed the water. Evidently the groom, Hatam bin Hazat, had heard that his young bride liked red roses. Upon seeing the extravagant display two days earlier, Sita vowed never to look upon another red rose in her life. Dozens of Filipino servants crossed the lawn, carrying silver trays stacked high with every imaginable food, prepared by eighteen chefs brought in from Egypt. Roast almond duck, curried beef rolled in lamb flanks, liver-stuffed lobster--Miriam had never seen such an extravagant display. And this for the women only. As at many Saudi weddings, the male guests would never actually see the women. Custom required two separate ceremonies for the simple reason that women attended weddings unveiled. The traditional path of the Wahhabi sect forbade a man from seeing the face of a woman unless she was a family member or tied closely to his family. Sounds of music and drums and gaiety drifted through the window. The world mistook the prevailing cultural practices in the Arabian Peninsula as unfair to women, Miriam often thought. She'd studied at the University of Berkeley in California for three months two summers ago and had first heard there the misconception that a Saudi woman dies three times during her span on earth. It was said that she dies on the day of her first menses, when she is forced to don the black veil and slip into obscurity; she dies on the day of her wedding, when she is given as a possession to a stranger; and she dies when she finally passes on. She'd been tempted to slap the woman who uttered the words. Perhaps if the Americans knew Saudi history better, they would hold their tongues. True enough, a woman was traditionally forbidden from some of the activities accepted by the West--driving, for example. Or giving testimony in a dispute. Or walking about freely with her face uncovered. But all of these practices advanced Saudi culture in ways the West did not see. Saudis understood the value of strong families, for example. Of loyalty to God and his word. Of respect for an order that supported both families and God. Miriam let her mind drift over the events that had placed her and her friend Sita here, in this magnificent palace, where they awaited the ceremony that would change Sita's life as she knew it. The kingdom's first king, Abdul Aziz ibn Saud, conquered Riyadh in 1902. He was in his early twenties then. The four kings who had ruled since his death in 1953 were all his sons. But when Miriam looked down history's foggy halls, she decided it was the first king's women, not his sons, who shaped the country. He'd taken over three hundred wives, and it was these women who gave him so many sons. "I can't believe it's actually happening," Sita said from the sofa. Miriam let the curtain fall back in place and turned around. Sita sat like a small doll dressed in lace and pink. At weddings, all the women, from bride to servants, shed their black abaayas and veils for colorful dresses. Her eyes were round and dark--so very insecure. Miriam and Sultana had rescued Sita from a floc
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Ted Dekker

Ted Dekker is known for novels that combine adrenaline-laced stories with unexpected plot twists, unforgettable characters, and incredible confrontations between good and evil. The son of missionaries, he grew up in the jungles of Indonesia. He returned to the United States to attend Evangel College, graduating with a religion & philosophy major. After several years in corporate marketing, in 1997 he began writing books like Heaven's Wager now he has written numerous books including bestsellers Skin, In the Blink of an Eye, Saint and Thr3e. Ted lives in Austin with his wife LeeAnn and their four children. Most recently he has published Kiss and Immanuel's Veins
-Editorial Review.

Customer Reviews For "Blink of An Eye"

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Insightful and mind-blowing!
5 stars By Brooke, Aug 30 2012
Ted Dekker has once again created a fast paced, action filled adventure that you cannot put down. And as usual there is depth as well as action. This one combines a Saudi Arabian princess, an American college student with a genius IQ and a thrilling chase with an exploration of free will and predestination. Entertaining and insightful 'Blink of an Eye' will have you on the edge of your seat and get you thinking too! Definitely on my 'must read' list.
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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 159733
  • Product Code 9781595544803
  • ISBN 1595544801
  • EAN 9781595544803
  • Pages 400
  • Department General Books
  • Category Fiction
  • Sub-Category Suspense Mystery
  • Publisher Thomas Nelson Publishers
  • Publication Date Jul 2008
  • Sales Rank #77663
  • Dimensions 213 x 140 x 27 mm
  • Weight 0.371kg

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