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Carry Me Over the Threshold

Kristina Seleshanko
Carry Me Over the Threshold
sneak Peek

Carry Me Over the Threshold

Kristina Seleshanko
A CHRISTIAN GUIDE TO WEDDING TRADITIONS

$23.99

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Create a wedding that reflects your Christian values with this guide to wedding traditionsDo you know where your favorite wedding traditions came from? Do you want to create a wedding that reflects your Christian faith and practice? From "something borrowed, something blue" to white veils and bridal gowns, from orange blossoms to tossing rice at the happy couple, you'll learn about the meaning and historical significance of traditions for before, during, and after the wedding. For every Christian bride who wants to let her light shine, Carry Me Over the Threshold will help you create a memorable wedding that reflects your deepest spiritual values.

- Publisher Carry Me Over the ThresholdCopyright 2005 by Kristina SeleshankoIllustrations Copyright 2005 by Lyn BoyerRequests for information should be addressed to:Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49530Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication DataSeleshanko, Kristina, 1971-Carry me over the threshold : a Christianguide to wedding traditions /Kristina Seleshanko.p. cm.Includes bibliographical references and index.ISBN-10: 0-310-26476-6ISBN-13: 978-0-310-26476-71. Marriage - Religious aspects - Christianity.2. Weddings. I. Title.BV835.S435 2005392.5''088''27 - dc222005008720This edition printed on acid-free paper.All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible:New International Version. NIV. Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984 by InternationalBible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved.Scripture quotations marked NKJV are taken from the New King James Version.Copyright 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved.Scripture quotations marked NLT are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation,copyright 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton,IL 60189 USA. All rights reserved.Scripture quotations marked NASB are taken from the New American Standard Bible.Copyright 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by TheLockman Foundation. Used by permission.All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrievalsystem, or transmitted in any form or by any means - electronic, mechanical, photocopy,recording, or any other - except for brief quotations in printed reviews, withoutthe prior permission of the publisher.Interior design by Michelle EspinozaPrinted in the United States of America05 06 07 08 09 10 11 - 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1part 1pre-ceremony traditionschapter 1announcements and bannslong ago, engagements and betrothals were much more publicthan they are today. In biblical times, Hebrews declaredtheir matrimonial intentions to the entire community. Neighbors,friends, and family witnessed the couple''spromise tomarry and watched as the groom offered gifts to the bride.Often the groom''s friends also gave presents - sometimesin the form of money, which helped pay for the wedding. Agrand feast followed, including eating, drinking, music, anddancing.During the Middle Ages, parents of the bride hired"barkers" - men who shouted out the wedding news for all thetown to hear. Newspaper announcements of engagements andweddings started to appear in the eighteenth century. Thesewere brief news accounts naming the coupleand their parents,and sometimes stating the time and place of the wedding. Photographsdidn''t accompany such announcements until the earlytwentieth century; at that time, a photo of the bride - all byherself - was sometimes seen. Showing the coupletogether isa modern tradition.Throughout most of the nineteenth century, newspaperannouncements were rare; most Victorians were horrified tohave their picture in the newspaper - although some engagementsfound their way into gossip columns. Formal handwrittennotes from the bride''s mother were considered the best wayto announce the engagement to family and friends.Since ancient times, "banns" have also involved the publicin couples''engagements. Banns (an old English word meaning"to summon") are announcements of wedding intentionsread from the church pulpit. They are still used in many partsof the world. Banns are said to have originated with Charlemagne- the first king to create what was called a "Christiannation." In the first several years of Charlemagne''s reign(around AD 800), the number of children of dubious lineagewas vast; Charlemagne was concerned that peoplewere marryinghalf brothers or sisters without realizing it. Not only didthis pose moral difficulties from the Christianstandpoint, butit resulted in birth defects. Therefore, the king ordered thatall marriages must be announced publicly so that anyone with

- Publisher Carry Me Over the Threshold Copyright 2005 by Kristina Seleshanko Illustrations Copyright 2005 by Lyn Boyer Requests for information should be addressed to: Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49530 Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Seleshanko, Kristina, 1971- Carry me over the threshold : a Christian guide to wedding traditions / Kristina Seleshanko. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN-10: 0-310-26476-6 ISBN-13: 978-0-310-26476-7 1. Marriage - Religious aspects - Christianity. 2. Weddings. I. Title. BV835.S435 2005 392.5'088'27 - dc22 2005008720 This edition printed on acid-free paper. All Scripture "tations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible: New International Version. NIV. Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984 by International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved. Scripture "tations marked NKJV are taken from the New King James Version. Copyright 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Scripture "tations marked NLT are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, IL 60189 USA. All rights reserved. Scripture "tations marked NASB are taken from the New American Standard Bible. Copyright 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation. Used by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means - electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or any other - except for brief "tations in printed reviews, without the prior permission of the publisher. Interior design by Michelle Espinoza Printed in the United States of America 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 - 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 part 1 pre-ceremony traditions chapter 1 announcements and banns long ago, engagements and betrothals were much more public than they are today. In biblical times, Hebrews declared their matrimonial intentions to the entire community. Neighbors, friends, and family witnessed the couple's promise to marry and watched as the groom offered gifts to the bride. Often the groom's friends also gave presents - sometimes in the form of money, which helped pay for the wedding. A grand feast followed, including eating, drinking, music, and dancing. During the Middle Ages, parents of the bride hired "barkers" - men who shouted out the wedding news for all the town to hear. Newspaper announcements of engagements and weddings started to appear in the eighteenth century. These were brief news accounts naming the couple and their parents, and sometimes stating the time and place of the wedding. Photographs didn't accompany such announcements until the early twentieth century; at that time, a photo of the bride - all by herself - was sometimes seen. Showing the couple together is a modern tradition. Throughout most of the nineteenth century, newspaper announcements were rare; most Victorians were horrified to have their picture in the newspaper - although some engagements found their way into gossip columns. Formal handwritten notes from the bride's mother were considered the best way to announce the engagement to family and friends. Since ancient times, "banns" have also involved the public in couples' engagements. Banns (an old English word meaning "to summon") are announcements of wedding intentions read from the church pulpit. They are still used in many parts of the world. Banns are said to have originated with Charlemagne - the first king to create what was called a "Christian nation." In the first several year

- Publisher
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About "Carry Me Over the Threshold"

Create a wedding that reflects your Christian values with this guide to wedding traditionsDo you know where your favorite wedding traditions came from? Do you want to create a wedding that reflects your Christian faith and practice? From "something borrowed, something blue" to white veils and bridal gowns, from orange blossoms to tossing rice at the happy couple, you'll learn about the meaning and historical significance of traditions for before, during, and after the wedding. For every Christian bride who wants to let her light shine, Carry Me Over the Threshold will help you create a memorable wedding that reflects your deepest spiritual values.
- Publisher

Carry Me Over the ThresholdCopyright 2005 by Kristina SeleshankoIllustrations Copyright 2005 by Lyn BoyerRequests for information should be addressed to:Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49530Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication DataSeleshanko, Kristina, 1971-Carry me over the threshold : a Christianguide to wedding traditions /Kristina Seleshanko.p. cm.Includes bibliographical references and index.ISBN-10: 0-310-26476-6ISBN-13: 978-0-310-26476-71. Marriage - Religious aspects - Christianity.2. Weddings. I. Title.BV835.S435 2005392.5''088''27 - dc222005008720This edition printed on acid-free paper.All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible:New International Version. NIV. Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984 by InternationalBible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved.Scripture quotations marked NKJV are taken from the New King James Version.Copyright 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved.Scripture quotations marked NLT are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation,copyright 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton,IL 60189 USA. All rights reserved.Scripture quotations marked NASB are taken from the New American Standard Bible.Copyright 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by TheLockman Foundation. Used by permission.All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrievalsystem, or transmitted in any form or by any means - electronic, mechanical, photocopy,recording, or any other - except for brief quotations in printed reviews, withoutthe prior permission of the publisher.Interior design by Michelle EspinozaPrinted in the United States of America05 06 07 08 09 10 11 - 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1part 1pre-ceremony traditionschapter 1announcements and bannslong ago, engagements and betrothals were much more publicthan they are today. In biblical times, Hebrews declaredtheir matrimonial intentions to the entire community. Neighbors,friends, and family witnessed the couple''spromise tomarry and watched as the groom offered gifts to the bride.Often the groom''s friends also gave presents - sometimesin the form of money, which helped pay for the wedding. Agrand feast followed, including eating, drinking, music, anddancing.During the Middle Ages, parents of the bride hired"barkers" - men who shouted out the wedding news for all thetown to hear. Newspaper announcements of engagements andweddings started to appear in the eighteenth century. Thesewere brief news accounts naming the coupleand their parents,and sometimes stating the time and place of the wedding. Photographsdidn''t accompany such announcements until the earlytwentieth century; at that time, a photo of the bride - all byherself - was sometimes seen. Showing the coupletogether isa modern tradition.Throughout most of the nineteenth century, newspaperannouncements were rare; most Victorians were horrified tohave their picture in the newspaper - although some engagementsfound their way into gossip columns. Formal handwrittennotes from the bride''s mother were considered the best wayto announce the engagement to family and friends.Since ancient times, "banns" have also involved the publicin couples''engagements. Banns (an old English word meaning"to summon") are announcements of wedding intentionsread from the church pulpit. They are still used in many partsof the world. Banns are said to have originated with Charlemagne- the first king to create what was called a "Christiannation." In the first several years of Charlemagne''s reign(around AD 800), the number of children of dubious lineagewas vast; Charlemagne was concerned that peoplewere marryinghalf brothers or sisters without realizing it. Not only didthis pose moral difficulties from the Christianstandpoint, butit resulted in birth defects. Therefore, the king ordered thatall marriages must be announced publicly so that anyone with
- Publisher

Carry Me Over the Threshold Copyright 2005 by Kristina Seleshanko Illustrations Copyright 2005 by Lyn Boyer Requests for information should be addressed to: Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49530 Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Seleshanko, Kristina, 1971- Carry me over the threshold : a Christian guide to wedding traditions / Kristina Seleshanko. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN-10: 0-310-26476-6 ISBN-13: 978-0-310-26476-7 1. Marriage - Religious aspects - Christianity. 2. Weddings. I. Title. BV835.S435 2005 392.5'088'27 - dc22 2005008720 This edition printed on acid-free paper. All Scripture "tations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible: New International Version. NIV. Copyright 1973, 1978, 1984 by International Bible Society. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved. Scripture "tations marked NKJV are taken from the New King James Version. Copyright 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Scripture "tations marked NLT are taken from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright 1996. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Wheaton, IL 60189 USA. All rights reserved. Scripture "tations marked NASB are taken from the New American Standard Bible. Copyright 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation. Used by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means - electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or any other - except for brief "tations in printed reviews, without the prior permission of the publisher. Interior design by Michelle Espinoza Printed in the United States of America 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 - 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 part 1 pre-ceremony traditions chapter 1 announcements and banns long ago, engagements and betrothals were much more public than they are today. In biblical times, Hebrews declared their matrimonial intentions to the entire community. Neighbors, friends, and family witnessed the couple's promise to marry and watched as the groom offered gifts to the bride. Often the groom's friends also gave presents - sometimes in the form of money, which helped pay for the wedding. A grand feast followed, including eating, drinking, music, and dancing. During the Middle Ages, parents of the bride hired "barkers" - men who shouted out the wedding news for all the town to hear. Newspaper announcements of engagements and weddings started to appear in the eighteenth century. These were brief news accounts naming the couple and their parents, and sometimes stating the time and place of the wedding. Photographs didn't accompany such announcements until the early twentieth century; at that time, a photo of the bride - all by herself - was sometimes seen. Showing the couple together is a modern tradition. Throughout most of the nineteenth century, newspaper announcements were rare; most Victorians were horrified to have their picture in the newspaper - although some engagements found their way into gossip columns. Formal handwritten notes from the bride's mother were considered the best way to announce the engagement to family and friends. Since ancient times, "banns" have also involved the public in couples' engagements. Banns (an old English word meaning "to summon") are announcements of wedding intentions read from the church pulpit. They are still used in many parts of the world. Banns are said to have originated with Charlemagne - the first king to create what was called a "Christian nation." In the first several year
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Kristina Seleshanko

Kristina Seleshanko, former adjunct instructor of writing and women's history, is the author of fourteen books, including Victorian and Edwardian Fashions for Women (featured in Martha Stewart Weddings), Victorian Fashions in America, Singing Secrets and others. Kristina also writes articles on a variety of topics for magazines such as Today's Christian Women, Woman's Day, Country Victorian, True West Journal, and Sew News.

Table Of Contents

  • Acknowledgments 11
  • Introduction: Let Your Light Shine! 13
  • Part One
  • Pre-ceremony Traditions
  • 1. Announcements And Banns 21
  • 2. Bachelor Parties 23
  • 3. Betrothal 25
  • 4. Bridal Attendants 27
  • 5. Bridal Registries 29
  • 6. Bridal Showers 30
  • 7. Bride Price 32
  • 8. Bridesmaids' Tea 33
  • 9. Bundling 34
  • 10. Capturing The Bride 36
  • 11. Counseling 38
  • 12. Dowries 40
  • 13. Engagement Parties 41
  • 14. Engagement Rings 43
  • 15. Flower Girls, Pages, And Ring Bearers 49
  • 16. Invitations 50
  • Contents
  • 17. Location And Time 52
  • 18. Marriage Contracts 56
  • 19. Parents' Dinner 58
  • 20. Promise Rings 59
  • 21. Proposals 60
  • 22. Transportation To The Ceremony 62
  • 23. Trousseaux And Hope Chests 63
  • Part Two
  • Ceremony Traditions
  • 24. Aisle Runners 66
  • 25. Bridal Accessories 67
  • 26. Bridal Gowns 71
  • 27. Communion 75
  • 28. Electronic Weddings 76
  • 29. Flowers 78
  • 30. Gifts For The Wedding Party 82
  • 31. Groom's Attire 83
  • 32. Jumping The Broom 84
  • 33. Kissing At The Ceremony's End 85
  • 34. Leaving The Ceremony 86
  • 35. Music 89
  • 36. Processionals 91
  • 37. Standing On The Left 93
  • 38. Taking The Husband's Last Name 94
  • 39. Unity Candles 95
  • 40. Vows 98
  • 41. Wedding Bells 102
  • 42. Wedding Rings 103
  • Part Three
  • Post-ceremony Traditions
  • 43. Anniversaries 106
  • 44. Bedding 108
  • 45. Cakes 110
  • 46. Carrying The Bride Over The Threshold 114
  • 47. Dancing 115
  • 48. Favors 117
  • 49. Honeymoons 118
  • 50. Receiving Line 120
  • 51. Receptions 121
  • 52. Shoes 123
  • 53. Toasts 125
  • 54. Tossing The Garter And Bouquet 127
  • 55. Wedding Gifts 129
  • Epilogue 131
  • Selected Bibliography 133
  • Index 135

Excerpt

Excerpt from: Carry Me Over the Threshold

Carry Me Over the Threshold part 1 pre-ceremony traditions chapter 1 announcements and banns long ago, engagements and betrothals were much more public than they are today. In biblical times, Hebrews declared their matrimonial intentions to the entire community. Neighbors, friends, and family witnessed the couple's promise to marry and watched as the groom offered gifts to the bride. Often the groom's friends also gave presents --- sometimes in the form of money, which helped pay for the wedding. A grand feast followed, including eating, drinking, music, and dancing. During the Middle Ages, parents of the bride hired 'barkers' --- men who shouted out the wedding news for all the town to hear. Newspaper announcements of engagements and weddings started to appear in the eighteenth century. These were brief news accounts naming the couple and their parents, and sometimes stating the time and place of the wedding. Photographs didn't accompany such announcements until the early twentieth century; at that time, a photo of the bride --- all by herself --- was sometimes seen. Showing the couple together is a modern tradition. Throughout most of the nineteenth century, newspaper announcements were rare; most Victorians were horrified to have their picture in the newspaper --- although some engagements found their way into gossip columns. Formal handwritten notes from the bride's mother were considered the best way to announce the engagement to family and friends. Since ancient times, 'banns' have also involved the public in couples' engagements. Banns (an old English word meaning 'to summon') are announcements of wedding intentions read from the church pulpit. They are still used in many parts of the world. Banns are said to have originated with Charlemagne --- the first king to create what was called a 'Christian nation.' In the first several years of Charlemagne's reign (around AD 800), the number of children of dubious lineage was vast; Charlemagne was concerned that people were marrying half brothers or sisters without realizing it. Not only did this pose moral difficulties from the Christian standpoint, but it resulted in birth defects. Therefore, the king ordered that all marriages must be announced publicly so that anyone with information about the couple's lineage could come forward and stop the marriage, if necessary. Banns also helped prevent bigamy and lapses in betrothal agreements. Banns continued as a tradition in most Christian nations --- though today such readings are usually just a way to spread the good news. Although banns are virtually unknown in the United States (they largely passed out of fashion in the 1930s and '40s), they are still usually required if a couple wishes to be married in the Church of England. In Canada, couples must either obtain a state license or have banns read in church. bachelor parties traditionally, bachelor parties are thrown by the groom's friends to good-naturedly poke fun at his 'last night of freedom.' Some experts believe bachelor parties began in the fifteenth century, when Spartan military men would feast and toast each other the night before they married --- the same way they'd feast after a soldier's death in battle. Nonetheless, while there hasn't always been a name for it, some form of the bachelor party has probably existed for most of history. Even though drinking and philandering are closely connected to the bachelor party tradition, a more meaningful element has always graced them: the bachelor party is a way for the groom to pledge his continued friendship to his male friends, despite his change in status. No modern groom should feel he must offend or be unfaithful to his bride at his bachelor party. In fact, today's grooms often opt for bachelor parties centered around sports or events (such as taking in a baseball game or going fishing), Bible retreats (getaways to somewhat remote areas to focus on Christian fellowship and Bible study), barbeques, or some adventure the groom has always wanted to try (such as skydiving). Whatever is chosen for the party, it should be something the groom is comfortable with, and it shouldn't keep him up late the night before the wedding. (Trust me, weddings are exhausting all by themselves!) Bachelorette parties began popping up in the 1960s and '70s; some women felt bridal showers were dowdy and boring and wanted the alleged fun of drinking and strippers instead. Today bachelorette parties are less in fashion, and more creative bridal showers tend to be favored. A new twist on the bachelor party is the coed get-together. Designed as a way to celebrate with friends and family of both sexes, the coed party often includes the bride as well as the groom. betrothal in biblical times, betrothals were a vital part of marriage custom. Although betrothal is sometimes defined as 'engagement,' a betrothal is actually a different and much more serious affair. An engaged person can break off the engagement at any time without much consequence. A betrothed person cannot legally break off the betrothal, except in rare instances. Betrothals were binding agreements --- just as binding as the marriage itself. They were agreed to among witnesses, and a contract was signed. The groom sealed the contract by giving the bride gifts; in many ancient cultures, this included a betrothal ring, a forerunner of the modern engagement ring. Sometimes, in lieu of a ring, a coin was split in two; one half was given to the groom, and one half to the bride. The betrothal ceremony was followed by a party to celebrate the upcoming marriage. Among the ancient Hebrews, betrothals could be broken only for the biblical reasons given for divorce. For example, consider Mary and Joseph, Jesus' earthly parents. Because they were betrothed but not yet married, they didn't have the right to be sexually intimate; therefore, when Mary told Joseph she was pregnant, Joseph assumed she'd been with another man. A betrothed woman who was intimate with another man committed adultery, which is why Joseph considered 'divorcing' Mary (see Matt. 1:18 -- 19). Similarly, if a betrothed man promised to marry a second woman, he was considered a bigamist. The Hebrew word for betrothal (kiddushin or qiddushin) means 'to be set apart, or sanctified.' Ancient accounts of betrothals indicate they were considered real and binding --- but incomplete --- marriages. In fact, betrothed couples often called themselves 'husband' and 'wife.' Betrothal was the first step toward being married, with the wedding ceremony and consummation being the final steps. In most cases, at least twelve months elapsed between the betrothal and the wedding. Many scholars believe ancient Hebrews used the betrothal as the beginning of courtship. If a young man noticed a young woman who pleased him, he'd either go to his father (so the marriage could be arranged by the parents) or go directly to the girl's father (to see if he was willing to have his daughter married). If the fathers approved, the young man approached his chosen bride with a cup of wine --- and in some cases, a marriage contract. The young woman read the contract (which included everything from monetary issues to promises the man made to her on a personal level), and if she liked him, she drank from the wine glass, indicating a betrothal could be formed. If she pushed the glass away, she refused his offer. Until that time, most brides and grooms didn't know each other; therefore, the year between betrothal and marriage was a chance for the young man to woo his soon-to-be wife. Today there is a growing trend in the Christian community to bring back betrothals; because they're a serious commitment, they protect both parties from engagements made too lightly. In some areas of the western world, a non-binding betrothal is made between couples as a public way to make a pledge of marriage;

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 235501
  • Product Code 0310264766
  • EAN 9780310264767
  • UPC 025986264765
  • Pages 144
  • Department Gifts
  • Category Special Occasions
  • Sub-Category Wedding
  • Publisher Zondervan
  • Release Date Dec 2005
  • Dimensions 132 x 187 x 15 mm
  • Weight 0.229kg

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