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Christ All Sufficient (Colossians & Philemon) (Welwyn Commentary Series)

J P Arthur

Christ All Sufficient (Colossians & Philemon) (Welwyn Commentary Series)

J P Arthur

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Paul, under house arrest in Rome, wrote two letters which were both sent to Colosse at the same time and by the same messenger, a man named Tychicus.

One of the letters we know as the epistle to the Colossians. It is packed with good things. Not a word is wasted. There was a problem in the church at Colosse, and it was this that prompted Paul to write. It seemed that there was a real danger that an impressionable young church might be seduced away from uncomplicated and straightforward devotion to Christ. There was a new mood in the church, a worrying tendency to be influenced by currents of thought from outside, from society at large - a danger that is still present in our own day.

The most important consequence of the new teachings was that they would wean people away from Christ in subtle ways by making them preoccupied with other things in addition to him. In order to counter this emphasis, Paul wrote a letter that is full of Christ. Read it, and it will work wonders for your confidence. In a variety of ways it makes the point that Christ is magnificent, that nothing can compare with him, and if we have Jesus, we have enough.

The second letter, the epistle to Philemon, was addressed to one of the members of the church in Colosse and related to another person from the same town. It is a highly personal letter, written from one Christian to another, and it has a fascination all its own. At its heart is a theme that is vital for all Christians - that of forgiveness. Christians are, by definition, a forgiven people, and forgiveness is an ongoing necessity in all our relationships. Few things bring the cause of God into more disrepute than Christians who begrudge reconciliation.


Phil Arthur studied history at Cambridge. He has been pastor of Free Grace Baptist Church, Lancaster, England, since 1988. He and his wife Barbara have three sons. He is the author of two other titles in the Welwyn Commentary Series, Patience of Hope (1 and 2 Thessalonians) and Strength in Weakness (2 Corinthians).

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About "Christ All Sufficient (Colossians & Philemon) (Welwyn Commentary Series)"

Paul, under house arrest in Rome, wrote two letters which were both sent to Colosse at the same time and by the same messenger, a man named Tychicus.

One of the letters we know as the epistle to the Colossians. It is packed with good things. Not a word is wasted. There was a problem in the church at Colosse, and it was this that prompted Paul to write. It seemed that there was a real danger that an impressionable young church might be seduced away from uncomplicated and straightforward devotion to Christ. There was a new mood in the church, a worrying tendency to be influenced by currents of thought from outside, from society at large - a danger that is still present in our own day.

The most important consequence of the new teachings was that they would wean people away from Christ in subtle ways by making them preoccupied with other things in addition to him. In order to counter this emphasis, Paul wrote a letter that is full of Christ. Read it, and it will work wonders for your confidence. In a variety of ways it makes the point that Christ is magnificent, that nothing can compare with him, and if we have Jesus, we have enough.

The second letter, the epistle to Philemon, was addressed to one of the members of the church in Colosse and related to another person from the same town. It is a highly personal letter, written from one Christian to another, and it has a fascination all its own. At its heart is a theme that is vital for all Christians - that of forgiveness. Christians are, by definition, a forgiven people, and forgiveness is an ongoing necessity in all our relationships. Few things bring the cause of God into more disrepute than Christians who begrudge reconciliation.


Phil Arthur studied history at Cambridge. He has been pastor of Free Grace Baptist Church, Lancaster, England, since 1988. He and his wife Barbara have three sons. He is the author of two other titles in the Welwyn Commentary Series, Patience of Hope (1 and 2 Thessalonians) and Strength in Weakness (2 Corinthians).

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- Koorong

The letter that we know as Colossians is short, a mere four chapters. Nevertheless, it is packed with good things. Not a word is wasted. It was written by the Apostle Paul to a group of Christians in a town named Colosse. This town was situated in a region known in ancient times as Phrygia. When the Romans conquered it they incorporated it into their province of Asia. (This region is now known as Anatolia in modern Turkey.) Next we turn to a small letter that went in the same post. Paul, under house arrest in Rome, had entrusted the delivery of the letter that we know as Colossians to a man named Tychicus. He was also given the responsibility of delivering this epistle too. It concerns two first-century believers. It was intended for one member of the church in Colosse and concerned another person from the same town. It is a highly personal letter written from one Christian to another, from the apostle Paul to a man named Philemon.
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  • Catalogue Code 264322
  • Product Code 9780852346556
  • ISBN 0852346557
  • EAN 9780852346556
  • Pages 240
  • Department Academic
  • Category New Testament Commentaries
  • Sub-Category Colossians
  • Publisher Evangelical Press
  • Publication Date Dec 2009
  • Sales Rank #59510
  • Dimensions 216 x 143 x 14 mm
  • Weight 0.304kg

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