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Comparing Religions Through Law

Jacob Neusner

Comparing Religions Through Law

Jacob Neusner

$72.99

Paperback
Both Judaism and Islam define the character of the social order, morality and theology through law, reflecting the shared view that there is nothing in human life beyond the scope of divine concern. But the uniqueness of the two religions is apparent in the areas where they disagree: the idea of the Land of Israel has no counterpart in Islam, while Islam's jihad is nowhere to be found in Jewish law. ^The authors compare the classical statements of the Torah and of classical Sunni Islamic law to present an innovative study that compares and contrasts the two religions, and offers an example of how comparative religious studies can provide the grounds for mutual understanding.

- Publisher Preface I. Comparing Islam and Judaism in Particular. A. Why Compare Religions and Why Compare their Laws? B. The Nonotheist Religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam C. Which Judaism, Which Islam, and Why? D. Category Formations: Comparing Incomparables 1. Shared Structure 2. Shared Disproportionate Categories a. Where They Say Much the Same Thing about the Same Topic b. Where They Say Different Things about the Same Topic 3. Unique Categories: Areas Where They Do Not IntersectII. The Authoritative Documents of Judaism and Islam A. Where Do We Look for the Law? B. The Written Torah and the Oral Torah: Scripture, the Mishnah and the Talmuds 1. Scripture: The Written Torah 2. Mishnah: The Oral Torah 3. The Talmuds C. Islamic Counterparts 1. Scripture: The Qur'an 2. Tradition: The Sunna 3. Fiqh D. ConclusionsIII. The Intellectual Sources of the Law A. How Do the Authorities of the Law Reason? B. Islam: Consensus, Reasoning, Exceptions 1. Consensus (Ijma') 2. Reasoning (ijtihad) 3. Exceptions C. Judaic Counterparts: Exegesis, Logic, Argument, Dialectics 1. Exegesis: Midrash Halakhah 2. The Mishnah's Applied Logic of Hierarchical Classification 3. The Argument of Analogy and Contrast 4. The Talmud's Dialectics D. ConclusionsIV. The Working of the Law: Institutions A. Institutional Authority B. The Israelite Court in the Legal Narrative of Islam 1. Legitimacy 2. Courts' Jurisdiction 3. Evidence 4. Punishments D. ConclusionsV. The Working of the Law: Personnel A. Bases of Authority B. Islam 1. Legal Scholars (Fuqaha') 2. Judges 3. Muftis C.Judaism: The sage D. ConclusionsVI. Disproportions A. Temple Law and Sacrifice 1. Temple Law and Sacrifice in Judaism 2. Sacrifice in Islam B. Slave Laws in Islam and Judaism 1. Slave Laws in Islam 2. Slave Laws in Judaism C. Sacred Time/Sabbath in Judaism and Sacred Time/Pilgrimage Islam 1. Judaism: Sacred Time/Sabbath 2. Islam: Sacred Time/Pilgrimage D. ConclusionsVII. Unique Categories A. The Unique Category B. Enlandisement (Judaism) C. Jihad (Islam) D. The Sage and Torah Study in Judaism E. Khilafah and the Legal Scholars in Islam F. History, Time, and Paradigm in Judaism G. History in IslamVIII. Epilogue A. Comparisons Up Close B. Judaism and Islam: Comparisons in the Context of World ReligionsIndex

- Publisher 9780415194877

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About "Comparing Religions Through Law"

Both Judaism and Islam define the character of the social order, morality and theology through law, reflecting the shared view that there is nothing in human life beyond the scope of divine concern. But the uniqueness of the two religions is apparent in the areas where they disagree: the idea of the Land of Israel has no counterpart in Islam, while Islam's jihad is nowhere to be found in Jewish law. ^The authors compare the classical statements of the Torah and of classical Sunni Islamic law to present an innovative study that compares and contrasts the two religions, and offers an example of how comparative religious studies can provide the grounds for mutual understanding.
- Publisher

Preface I. Comparing Islam and Judaism in Particular. A. Why Compare Religions and Why Compare their Laws? B. The Nonotheist Religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam C. Which Judaism, Which Islam, and Why? D. Category Formations: Comparing Incomparables 1. Shared Structure 2. Shared Disproportionate Categories a. Where They Say Much the Same Thing about the Same Topic b. Where They Say Different Things about the Same Topic 3. Unique Categories: Areas Where They Do Not IntersectII. The Authoritative Documents of Judaism and Islam A. Where Do We Look for the Law? B. The Written Torah and the Oral Torah: Scripture, the Mishnah and the Talmuds 1. Scripture: The Written Torah 2. Mishnah: The Oral Torah 3. The Talmuds C. Islamic Counterparts 1. Scripture: The Qur'an 2. Tradition: The Sunna 3. Fiqh D. ConclusionsIII. The Intellectual Sources of the Law A. How Do the Authorities of the Law Reason? B. Islam: Consensus, Reasoning, Exceptions 1. Consensus (Ijma') 2. Reasoning (ijtihad) 3. Exceptions C. Judaic Counterparts: Exegesis, Logic, Argument, Dialectics 1. Exegesis: Midrash Halakhah 2. The Mishnah's Applied Logic of Hierarchical Classification 3. The Argument of Analogy and Contrast 4. The Talmud's Dialectics D. ConclusionsIV. The Working of the Law: Institutions A. Institutional Authority B. The Israelite Court in the Legal Narrative of Islam 1. Legitimacy 2. Courts' Jurisdiction 3. Evidence 4. Punishments D. ConclusionsV. The Working of the Law: Personnel A. Bases of Authority B. Islam 1. Legal Scholars (Fuqaha') 2. Judges 3. Muftis C.Judaism: The sage D. ConclusionsVI. Disproportions A. Temple Law and Sacrifice 1. Temple Law and Sacrifice in Judaism 2. Sacrifice in Islam B. Slave Laws in Islam and Judaism 1. Slave Laws in Islam 2. Slave Laws in Judaism C. Sacred Time/Sabbath in Judaism and Sacred Time/Pilgrimage Islam 1. Judaism: Sacred Time/Sabbath 2. Islam: Sacred Time/Pilgrimage D. ConclusionsVII. Unique Categories A. The Unique Category B. Enlandisement (Judaism) C. Jihad (Islam) D. The Sage and Torah Study in Judaism E. Khilafah and the Legal Scholars in Islam F. History, Time, and Paradigm in Judaism G. History in IslamVIII. Epilogue A. Comparisons Up Close B. Judaism and Islam: Comparisons in the Context of World ReligionsIndex
- Publisher

9780415194877
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Jacob Neusner

Jacob Neusner (Ph.D., Columbia University) is Distinguished Service Professor of the History and Theology of Judaism; Bard Center Fellow. He is the Editor of the three volume Encyclopedia of Judaism, he has published more than one thousand books and innumerable articles, including Theology of the Oral Torah, Theology of the Halakhah, and The Incarnation of God: The Character of Divinity in Formative Judaism.
Koorong -Editorial Review.

Table Of Contents

  • Preface I. Comparing Islam And Judaism In Particular. A. Why Compare Religions And Why Compare Their Laws? B. The Nonotheist Religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam C. Which Judaism, Which Islam, And Why? D. Category Formations: Comparing Incomparables 1. Shared Structure 2. Shared Disproportionate Categories A. Where They Say Much The Same Thing About The Same Topic B. Where They Say Different Things About The Same Topic 3. Unique Categories: Areas Where They Do Not Intersect Ii. The Authoritative Documents Of Judaism And Islam A. Where Do We Look For The Law? B. The Written Torah And The Oral Torah: Scripture, The Mishnah And The Talmuds 1. Scripture: The Written Torah 2. Mishnah: The Oral Torah 3. The Talmuds C. Islamic Counterparts 1. Scripture: The Qur'an 2. Tradition: The Sunna 3. Fiqh D. Conclusions Iii. The Intellectual Sources Of The Law A. How Do The Authorities Of The Law Reason? B. Islam: Consensus, Reasoning, Exceptions 1. Consensus (ijma') 2. Reasoning (ijtihad) 3. Exceptions C. Judaic Counterparts: Exegesis, Logic, Argument, Dialectics 1. Exegesis: Midrash Halakhah 2. The Mishnah's Applied Logic Of Hierarchical Classification 3. The Argument Of Analogy And Contrast 4. The Talmud's Dialectics D. Conclusions Iv. The Working Of The Law: Institutions A. Institutional Authority B. The Israelite Court In The Legal Narrative Of Islam 1. Legitimacy 2. Courts' Jurisdiction 3. Evidence 4. Punishments D. Conclusions V. The Working Of The Law: Personnel A. Bases Of Authority B. Islam 1. Legal Scholars (fuqaha') 2. Judges 3. Muftis C.judaism: The Sage D. Conclusions Vi. Disproportions A. Temple Law And Sacrifice 1. Temple Law And Sacrifice In Judaism 2. Sacrifice In Islam B. Slave Laws In Islam And Judaism 1. Slave Laws In Islam 2. Slave Laws In Judaism C. Sacred Time/sabbath In Judaism And Sacred Time/pilgrimage Islam 1. Judaism: Sacred Time/sabbath 2. Islam: Sacred Time/pilgrimage D. Conclusions Vii. Unique Categories A. The Unique Category B. Enlandisement (judaism) C. Jihad (islam) D. The Sage And Torah Study In Judaism E. Khilafah And The Legal Scholars In Islam F. History, Time, And Paradigm In Judaism G. History In Islam Viii. Epilogue A. Comparisons Up Close B. Judaism And Islam: Comparisons In The Context Of World Religions Index

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 133592
  • Product Code 0415194873
  • EAN 9780415194877
  • Pages 280
  • Department Academic
  • Category World Religions
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Routledge
  • Publication Date Aug 1999
  • Dimensions 235 x 159 x 156 mm
  • Weight 0.522kg

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