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Critical Concern: Cultural Shift

R Albert Mohler (Jr)

Critical Concern: Cultural Shift

R Albert Mohler (Jr)

$24.99

Hardback
If You Were a Fish, Would You Realize You Were Wet?

Every person is deeply embedded in today's cultural reality. Many are fundamentally unaware of this fact, but Christian faithfulness requires a thoughtful and conscious application of God's truth to everyday situations. This practical book by Dr. R. Albert Mohler, Jr. will get you outside of yourself and your surroundings to gain a fresh perspective. He offers straightforward answers to tough questions, including:
  • What is the culture, and how do I engage it?
  • Is truth relative?
  • Does morality really change over time?
  • How do I apply a Christian mind to contemporary events?
  • Just how important is politics
It's the meaty meal your soul and intellect will feast upon in this cheap fast-food world.

- Publisher

- Publisher Over the last twenty years, evangelical Christians have been politically mobilized in an outpouring of moral concern and political engagement unprecedented since the crusade against slavery in the nineteenth century. Is this a good development? Given the issues now confronting our nation, the issue of political involvement emerges anew with urgency. To what extent should Christians be involved in the political process? This question has troubled the Christian conscience for centuries. The emergence of the modern evangelical movement in the postWorld War II era brought a renewed concern for engagement with the culture and the political process. The late Carl F. H. Henry addressed evangelicals with a manifesto for Christian engagement in his landmark bookThe Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism.1 As Dr. Henry eloquently argued, disengagement from the critical issues of the day is not an option. An evangelical theology for political participation must be grounded in the larger context of cultural engagement. As the Christian worldview makes clear, our ultimate concern must be the glory of God. When Scripture instructs us to love God and then to love our neighbor as ourselves, it thereby gives us a clear mandate for the right kind of cultural engagement. We love our neighbor because we first love God. In His sovereignty, our Creator has put us within this cultural context in order that we may display His glory by preaching the gospel, confronting persons with God's truth, and serving as agents of salt and light in a dark and fallen world. In other words, love of God leads us to love our neighbor, and love of neighbor requires our participation in the culture and in the political process. Writing as the Roman Empire fell, Augustine, the great bishop and theologian of the early church, made this case in his monumental workThe City of God.2 As Augustine explained, humanity is confronted by two citiesthe City of God and the City of Man. The City of God is eternal and takes as its sole concern the greater glory of God. In the City of God, all things are ruled by God's Word, and the perfect rule of God is the passion of all its citizens. In the City of Man, however, the reality is very different. This city is filled with mixed passions, mixed allegiances, and compromised principles. Unlike the City of God, whose citizens are marked by unconditional obedience to the commands of God, citizens of the City of Man demonstrate deadly patterns of disobedience, even as they celebrate, claim their moral autonomy, and then revolt against the Creator. Of course, we know that the City of God is eternal, even as the City of Man is passing. But this does not mean that the City of Man is ultimately unimportant, and it does not allow the church to forfeit its responsibility to love its citizens. Love of neighborgrounded in our love for God requires us to work for good in the City of Man, even as we set as our first priority the preaching of the gospelthe only means of bringing citizens of the City of Man into citizenship in the City of God. Because of this, Christians bear important responsibilities in both cities. Even as we know that our ultimate citizenship is in heaven, and even as we set our sights on the glory of the City of God, we must work for good, justice, and righteousness in the City of Man. We do so, not merely because we are commanded to love its citizens, but because we know that they are loved by the very God we serve. From generation to generation, Christians often swing between two extremes, either ignoring the City of Man or considering it to be our main concern. A biblical balance establishes the fact that the City of Man is indeed passing and chastens us from believing that the City of Man and its realities can ever be of ultimate importance. Yet we also know that each of us is by

- Publisher

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About "Critical Concern: Cultural Shift"

If You Were a Fish, Would You Realize You Were Wet?

Every person is deeply embedded in today's cultural reality. Many are fundamentally unaware of this fact, but Christian faithfulness requires a thoughtful and conscious application of God's truth to everyday situations. This practical book by Dr. R. Albert Mohler, Jr. will get you outside of yourself and your surroundings to gain a fresh perspective. He offers straightforward answers to tough questions, including:

  • What is the culture, and how do I engage it?
  • Is truth relative?
  • Does morality really change over time?
  • How do I apply a Christian mind to contemporary events?
  • Just how important is politics
It's the meaty meal your soul and intellect will feast upon in this cheap fast-food world.
- Publisher


- Publisher

Over the last twenty years, evangelical Christians have been politically mobilized in an outpouring of moral concern and political engagement unprecedented since the crusade against slavery in the nineteenth century. Is this a good development? Given the issues now confronting our nation, the issue of political involvement emerges anew with urgency. To what extent should Christians be involved in the political process? This question has troubled the Christian conscience for centuries. The emergence of the modern evangelical movement in the postWorld War II era brought a renewed concern for engagement with the culture and the political process. The late Carl F. H. Henry addressed evangelicals with a manifesto for Christian engagement in his landmark bookThe Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism.1 As Dr. Henry eloquently argued, disengagement from the critical issues of the day is not an option. An evangelical theology for political participation must be grounded in the larger context of cultural engagement. As the Christian worldview makes clear, our ultimate concern must be the glory of God. When Scripture instructs us to love God and then to love our neighbor as ourselves, it thereby gives us a clear mandate for the right kind of cultural engagement. We love our neighbor because we first love God. In His sovereignty, our Creator has put us within this cultural context in order that we may display His glory by preaching the gospel, confronting persons with God's truth, and serving as agents of salt and light in a dark and fallen world. In other words, love of God leads us to love our neighbor, and love of neighbor requires our participation in the culture and in the political process. Writing as the Roman Empire fell, Augustine, the great bishop and theologian of the early church, made this case in his monumental workThe City of God.2 As Augustine explained, humanity is confronted by two citiesthe City of God and the City of Man. The City of God is eternal and takes as its sole concern the greater glory of God. In the City of God, all things are ruled by God's Word, and the perfect rule of God is the passion of all its citizens. In the City of Man, however, the reality is very different. This city is filled with mixed passions, mixed allegiances, and compromised principles. Unlike the City of God, whose citizens are marked by unconditional obedience to the commands of God, citizens of the City of Man demonstrate deadly patterns of disobedience, even as they celebrate, claim their moral autonomy, and then revolt against the Creator. Of course, we know that the City of God is eternal, even as the City of Man is passing. But this does not mean that the City of Man is ultimately unimportant, and it does not allow the church to forfeit its responsibility to love its citizens. Love of neighborgrounded in our love for God requires us to work for good in the City of Man, even as we set as our first priority the preaching of the gospelthe only means of bringing citizens of the City of Man into citizenship in the City of God. Because of this, Christians bear important responsibilities in both cities. Even as we know that our ultimate citizenship is in heaven, and even as we set our sights on the glory of the City of God, we must work for good, justice, and righteousness in the City of Man. We do so, not merely because we are commanded to love its citizens, but because we know that they are loved by the very God we serve. From generation to generation, Christians often swing between two extremes, either ignoring the City of Man or considering it to be our main concern. A biblical balance establishes the fact that the City of Man is indeed passing and chastens us from believing that the City of Man and its realities can ever be of ultimate importance. Yet we also know that each of us is by
- Publisher

Meet the Author

R Albert Mohler (Jr)

R. Albert Mohler Jr (Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is the Joseph Emerson Brown Professor of Christian Theology and President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, one of the largest seminaries in the world. Dr. Mohler has been recognized by influential publications such as Time and Christianity Today as a leader among American evangelicals. In fact, Time.com called him the reigning intellectual of the evangelical movement in the U.S.

Dr. Mohler hosts a daily live nationwide radio program on the Salem Radio Network. He also writes a popular blog and a regular commentary on moral, cultural and theological issues. He is a frequent guest on national and international news outlets and is a popular preacher, teacher and lecturer. He is also the author of Cultural Shift: Engaging Current Issues with Eternal Truths; Preaching: The Centrality of Scripture and most recently The Disappearance Of God.
Koorong-Editorial Review.

Customer Reviews For "Critical Concern: Cultural Shift"

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Recommended
4 stars By Arthur, Feb 25 2008
Culture Shift is a must read for any Christian who takes the command to be 'salt and light' seriously. Dr Mohler presents the current issues in the world which Christians should be wrestling with and provides sound biblical advice on how we should be thinking about these issues. Dr Mohler encourages us to be active participants in our culture and helps us to realise that we can shape our culture with the contributions we make in accordance to our Christian worldview. It is a book which challenges us to fight for the exclusivity of Jesus in a relativistic world and spurs us on to engage our culture with the sense of Christian worldview. The book is an easy read and is recommended highly. 
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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 253657
  • Product Code 159052974X
  • EAN 9781590529744
  • Pages 160
  • Department Academic
  • Category Christian Worldview
  • Sub-Category Media/culture
  • Publisher Multnomah Publishers
  • Publication Date Jan 2008
  • Dimensions 186 x 121 x 17 mm
  • Weight 0.209kg

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