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Deconstructing Theodicy

David B Burrell

Deconstructing Theodicy

David B Burrell

$39.99

Paperback
Maimonides called Job a "strange and wonderful book." For many readers, "strange" might well suffice. Though Job has been characterized as a theodicy, to the sincere reader the book can fail to satisfy the soul's longing for answers to the problem of suffering. Perhaps that in fact is the point of Job--there are no satisfactory propositional arguments for why people suffer.

In this compact yet rich volume, philosopher of religion David Burrell shows that Job actually deconstructs the theories of theodicy proposed by commentators over the centuries. This is seen in the fact that Job's three friends themselves offer theodicies, but are rebuked in the end, whereas Job, who seeks only to speak to God, is granted his audience. Rather than providing an exegetical commentary, Burrell engages in theological and philosophical reflection on the major movements of the book.

Deconstructing Theodicy also contains an interfaith perspective with the inclusion of a chapter by Islamic scholar A. H. Johns on the reading of the Job figure in the Koran. Burrell then goes on to examine the treatment of Job in four classical commentaries and finally explores Job's contribution to faith and theology as an affirmation that God hears and heeds our cries of anguish.

- Publisher An ancient commentator called Job a "strange and wonderful book." For many readers, "strange" might do. Though Job has been characterized as an answer to the problem of suffering, for many the book fails to satisfy the longing for answers it supposedly contains. Perhaps that, in fact, is the point of Job--there are no satisfactory arguments for why people suffer. In this compact yet substantial volume, David B. Burrell argues that this is the message of Job. Burrell engages major movements of the book in theological and philosophical reflection. The book also contains an interfaith perspective with the inclusion of a chapter by Islamic scholar A. H. Johns on the reading of the Job figure in the Koran. Burrell finally concludes that Job's contribution to the problem of suffering is as an affirmation that God hears and heeds our cries of anguish. EXCERPT While an initial reading of the story which frames the book of Job suggests a classical theodicy of divine testing and of reward and p

- Publisher

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About "Deconstructing Theodicy"

Maimonides called Job a "strange and wonderful book." For many readers, "strange" might well suffice. Though Job has been characterized as a theodicy, to the sincere reader the book can fail to satisfy the soul's longing for answers to the problem of suffering. Perhaps that in fact is the point of Job--there are no satisfactory propositional arguments for why people suffer.

In this compact yet rich volume, philosopher of religion David Burrell shows that Job actually deconstructs the theories of theodicy proposed by commentators over the centuries. This is seen in the fact that Job's three friends themselves offer theodicies, but are rebuked in the end, whereas Job, who seeks only to speak to God, is granted his audience. Rather than providing an exegetical commentary, Burrell engages in theological and philosophical reflection on the major movements of the book.

Deconstructing Theodicy also contains an interfaith perspective with the inclusion of a chapter by Islamic scholar A. H. Johns on the reading of the Job figure in the Koran. Burrell then goes on to examine the treatment of Job in four classical commentaries and finally explores Job's contribution to faith and theology as an affirmation that God hears and heeds our cries of anguish.

- Publisher

An ancient commentator called Job a "strange and wonderful book." For many readers, "strange" might do. Though Job has been characterized as an answer to the problem of suffering, for many the book fails to satisfy the longing for answers it supposedly contains. Perhaps that, in fact, is the point of Job--there are no satisfactory arguments for why people suffer. In this compact yet substantial volume, David B. Burrell argues that this is the message of Job. Burrell engages major movements of the book in theological and philosophical reflection. The book also contains an interfaith perspective with the inclusion of a chapter by Islamic scholar A. H. Johns on the reading of the Job figure in the Koran. Burrell finally concludes that Job's contribution to the problem of suffering is as an affirmation that God hears and heeds our cries of anguish. EXCERPT While an initial reading of the story which frames the book of Job suggests a classical theodicy of divine testing and of reward and p
- Publisher

Meet the Author

David B Burrell

David B. Burrell (PhD, Yale University) is the Theodore M. Hesburgh, CSC Professor in Philosophy and Theology at the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana. He is the author of several books, including Freedom and Creation in Three Traditions, Knowing the Unknowable God, Deconstructing Theodicy and Aquinas: God and Action.

Table Of Contents

  • 1. Introducing The Strategies Of This Reflection
    2. The Structure Of The Book With Its Framing Story
    3. Three Rounds Of Multifaceted Dialogue
    4. Denouement And Epilogue
    5. A Comparative Consideration Of Ayyub In The Qur'an [a.h. Johns]
    6. Classical Commentaries: Saadiah, Maimonides, Aquinas, And Gersonides
    7. Job Mediating Two Opposing Views Of Theodicy
    8. Assessing Job's Contribution To Theodicy: Semantics Of Explaining Or Addressing

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 268658
  • Product Code 9781587432224
  • ISBN 1587432226
  • EAN 9781587432224
  • Pages 144
  • Department Academic
  • Category Biblical Studies
  • Sub-Category Old Testament
  • Publisher Baker Book House
  • Publication Date Mar 2008
  • Sales Rank #77825
  • Dimensions 212 x 139 x 111 mm
  • Weight 0.204kg

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