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Diffusion of Innovations (4th Ed)

Everett Rogers
Diffusion of Innovations (4th Ed)

Diffusion of Innovations (4th Ed)

Everett Rogers

$79.99

Paperback
Since the first edition of this landmark book was published in 1962, ^Everett Rogers's name has become "virtually synonymous with the study ^of diffusion of innovations," according to Choice. The second and ^third editions of Diffusion of Innovations became the standard ^textbook and reference on diffusion studies. Now, in the fourth ^edition, Rogers presents the culmination of more than thirty years of ^research that will set a new standard for analysis and inquiry.^The fourth edition is (1) a revision of the theoretical framework and ^the research evidence supporting this model of diffusion, and (2) a ^new intellectual venture, in that new concepts and new theoretical ^viewpoints are introduced. This edition differs from its predecessors ^in that it takes a much more critical stance in its review and ^synthesis of 5,000 diffusion publications. During the past thirty ^years or so, diffusion research has grown to be widely recognized, ^applied and admired,

- Publisher Chapter 1 ELEMENTS OF DIFFUSION There is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than the creation of a new order of things....Whenever his enemies have the ability to attack the innovator they do so with the passion of partisans, while the others defend him sluggishly, so that the innovator and his party alike are vulnerable.Niccolo Machiavelli,The Prince Getting a new idea adopted, even when it has obvious advantages, is often very difficult. Many innovations require a lengthy period, often of many years, from the time they become available to the time they are widely adopted. Therefore, a common problem for many individuals and organizations is how to speed up the rate of diffusion of an innovation.The following case illustration provides insight into some common difficulties facing diffusion campaigns.Water Boiling in a Peruvian Village: Diffusion That FailedThe public health service in Peru attempts to introduce innovations to villagers to improve their health and lengthen their lives. This change agency encourages people to install latrines, to burn garbage daily, to control house flies, to report cases of infectious diseases, and to boil drinking water. These innovations involve major changes in thinking and behavior for Peruvian villagers, who do not understand the relationship of sanitation to illness. Water boiling is an especially important health practice for villagers in Peru. Unless they boil their drinking water, patients who are cured of infectious diseases in village medical clinics often return within a month to be treated again for the same disease.A two-year water boiling campaign conducted in Los Molinas, a peasant village of 200 families in the coastal region of Peru, persuaded only eleven housewives to boil water. From the viewpoint of the public health agency, the local health worker, Nelida, had a simple task: to persuade the housewives of Los Molinas to add water boiling to their pattern of daily behavior. Even with the aid of a medical doctor, who gave public talks on water boiling, and fifteen village housewives who were already boiling water before the campaign, Nelida's diffusion campaign failed. To understand why, we need to take a closer look at the culture, the local environment, and the individuals in Los Molinas.Most residents of Los Molinas are peasants who work as field hands on local plantations. Water is carried by can, pail, gourd, or cask. The three sources of water in Los Molinas include a seasonal irrigation ditch dose to the village, a spring more than a mile away from the village, and a public well whose water most villagers dislike. All three sources are subject to pollution at all times and show contamination whenever tested. Of the three sources, the irrigation ditch is the most commonly used. It is closer to most homes, and the villagers like its taste.Although it is not feasible for the village to install a sanitary water system, the incidence of typhoid and other water-borne diseases could be greatly reduced by boiling the water before it is consumed. During her two-year campaign in Los Molinas, Nelida made several visits to every home in the village but devoted especially intensive efforts to twenty-one families. She visited each of these selected families between fifteen and twenty-five times; eleven of these families now boil their water regularly.What kinds of persons do these numbers represent? We describe three village housewives -- one who boils water to obey custom, one who was persuaded to boil water by the health worker, and one of the many who rejected the innovation -- in order to add further insight into the process of diffusion.Mrs. A: Custom-Oriented Adopter.Mrs. A is about forty and suffers from a sinus infection. The Los Molinas villagers call her a "sickly one." Each morning, Mrs. A

- Publisher

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About "Diffusion of Innovations (4th Ed)"

Since the first edition of this landmark book was published in 1962, ^Everett Rogers's name has become "virtually synonymous with the study ^of diffusion of innovations," according to Choice. The second and ^third editions of Diffusion of Innovations became the standard ^textbook and reference on diffusion studies. Now, in the fourth ^edition, Rogers presents the culmination of more than thirty years of ^research that will set a new standard for analysis and inquiry.^The fourth edition is (1) a revision of the theoretical framework and ^the research evidence supporting this model of diffusion, and (2) a ^new intellectual venture, in that new concepts and new theoretical ^viewpoints are introduced. This edition differs from its predecessors ^in that it takes a much more critical stance in its review and ^synthesis of 5,000 diffusion publications. During the past thirty ^years or so, diffusion research has grown to be widely recognized, ^applied and admired,
- Publisher

Chapter 1 ELEMENTS OF DIFFUSION There is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than the creation of a new order of things....Whenever his enemies have the ability to attack the innovator they do so with the passion of partisans, while the others defend him sluggishly, so that the innovator and his party alike are vulnerable.Niccolo Machiavelli,The Prince Getting a new idea adopted, even when it has obvious advantages, is often very difficult. Many innovations require a lengthy period, often of many years, from the time they become available to the time they are widely adopted. Therefore, a common problem for many individuals and organizations is how to speed up the rate of diffusion of an innovation.The following case illustration provides insight into some common difficulties facing diffusion campaigns.Water Boiling in a Peruvian Village: Diffusion That FailedThe public health service in Peru attempts to introduce innovations to villagers to improve their health and lengthen their lives. This change agency encourages people to install latrines, to burn garbage daily, to control house flies, to report cases of infectious diseases, and to boil drinking water. These innovations involve major changes in thinking and behavior for Peruvian villagers, who do not understand the relationship of sanitation to illness. Water boiling is an especially important health practice for villagers in Peru. Unless they boil their drinking water, patients who are cured of infectious diseases in village medical clinics often return within a month to be treated again for the same disease.A two-year water boiling campaign conducted in Los Molinas, a peasant village of 200 families in the coastal region of Peru, persuaded only eleven housewives to boil water. From the viewpoint of the public health agency, the local health worker, Nelida, had a simple task: to persuade the housewives of Los Molinas to add water boiling to their pattern of daily behavior. Even with the aid of a medical doctor, who gave public talks on water boiling, and fifteen village housewives who were already boiling water before the campaign, Nelida's diffusion campaign failed. To understand why, we need to take a closer look at the culture, the local environment, and the individuals in Los Molinas.Most residents of Los Molinas are peasants who work as field hands on local plantations. Water is carried by can, pail, gourd, or cask. The three sources of water in Los Molinas include a seasonal irrigation ditch dose to the village, a spring more than a mile away from the village, and a public well whose water most villagers dislike. All three sources are subject to pollution at all times and show contamination whenever tested. Of the three sources, the irrigation ditch is the most commonly used. It is closer to most homes, and the villagers like its taste.Although it is not feasible for the village to install a sanitary water system, the incidence of typhoid and other water-borne diseases could be greatly reduced by boiling the water before it is consumed. During her two-year campaign in Los Molinas, Nelida made several visits to every home in the village but devoted especially intensive efforts to twenty-one families. She visited each of these selected families between fifteen and twenty-five times; eleven of these families now boil their water regularly.What kinds of persons do these numbers represent? We describe three village housewives -- one who boils water to obey custom, one who was persuaded to boil water by the health worker, and one of the many who rejected the innovation -- in order to add further insight into the process of diffusion.Mrs. A: Custom-Oriented Adopter.Mrs. A is about forty and suffers from a sinus infection. The Los Molinas villagers call her a "sickly one." Each morning, Mrs. A
- Publisher

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 144928
  • Product Code 0029266718
  • EAN 9780029266717
  • Pages 518
  • Department Academic
  • Category Church
  • Sub-Category Missions
  • Publisher Free Press
  • Publication Date Feb 1995
  • Dimensions 234 x 156 x 35 mm
  • Weight 0.732kg

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