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Discipleship and Family Ties in Mark and Matthew

Stephen C Barton

Discipleship and Family Ties in Mark and Matthew

Stephen C Barton

$190.00

Hardback
During the first two centuries CE there was a common awareness that familial tensions were generated by conversions to the Christian faith. Yet studies of Christian origins have so far paid little attention to the impact of the Christian movement upon attitudes to family ties and natural kinship. Stephen C. Barton remedies this deficiency by means of a detailed study of the relevant passages in the gospels of Mark and Matthew. First, however, he examines the religious traditions of Judaism and the philosophical traditions of the Greco-Roman world, and shows that the tensions apparent within the Christian movement were by no means unique. In all three areas of thought and religious belief there is found the conviction that familial obligations may be transcended by some higher responsibility, to God, to Christ, or to the demands of philosophy. Mark and Matthew saw the Jesus-movement as offering a transcendent allegiance, which relativised family ties.

- Publisher From the very beginning, following the Christian way commonly generated tensions within families. Insiders and outsiders alike bear witness to the threat to household and family ties posed by a transfer of the believer's primary allegiance to Christ. This study shows that the demand to subordinate family ties in response to the call of Jesus is quite intelligible in the context of beliefs and practices both in Judaism and in Greco-Roman philosophy of the first century. Such background is related to the Gospels of Mark and Matthew.

- Publisher This study raises important questions about the social impact of conversion during the first two centuries CE. The author convincingly challenges assumptions made about the relations between Christian faith and family life, and shows how important a concern the effects of discipleship on the family were for Mark and Matthew.

- Publisher

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About "Discipleship and Family Ties in Mark and Matthew"

During the first two centuries CE there was a common awareness that familial tensions were generated by conversions to the Christian faith. Yet studies of Christian origins have so far paid little attention to the impact of the Christian movement upon attitudes to family ties and natural kinship. Stephen C. Barton remedies this deficiency by means of a detailed study of the relevant passages in the gospels of Mark and Matthew. First, however, he examines the religious traditions of Judaism and the philosophical traditions of the Greco-Roman world, and shows that the tensions apparent within the Christian movement were by no means unique. In all three areas of thought and religious belief there is found the conviction that familial obligations may be transcended by some higher responsibility, to God, to Christ, or to the demands of philosophy. Mark and Matthew saw the Jesus-movement as offering a transcendent allegiance, which relativised family ties.
- Publisher

From the very beginning, following the Christian way commonly generated tensions within families. Insiders and outsiders alike bear witness to the threat to household and family ties posed by a transfer of the believer's primary allegiance to Christ. This study shows that the demand to subordinate family ties in response to the call of Jesus is quite intelligible in the context of beliefs and practices both in Judaism and in Greco-Roman philosophy of the first century. Such background is related to the Gospels of Mark and Matthew.
- Publisher

This study raises important questions about the social impact of conversion during the first two centuries CE. The author convincingly challenges assumptions made about the relations between Christian faith and family life, and shows how important a concern the effects of discipleship on the family were for Mark and Matthew.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Stephen C Barton

Dr Stephen C. Barton (Ph.D., King's College, London) is an Australian who is Reader in the Department of Theology and Religion, University of Durham. He is the author of Discipleship and Family Ties in Mark and Matthew, Invitation to the Bible, Life Together: Family, Sexuality and Community in the New Testament and Today and most recently Resurrection.
Koorong - Editorial Review.

Table Of Contents

  • Preface
  • Abbreviations
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The Subordination Of Family Ties In Judaism And In The Greco-roman
  • World Of The First Century
  • 3. Discipleship And Family Ties In Mark
  • 4. Discipleship And Family Ties In Matthew
  • 5. Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Index Of Passages
  • Index Of Authors.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 96383
  • Product Code 0521465303
  • EAN 9780521465304
  • Pages 276
  • Department Academic
  • Category Biblical Studies
  • Sub-Category New Testament
  • Publisher Cambridge University Uk
  • Publication Date Dec 1994
  • Dimensions 216 x 140 x 19 mm
  • Weight 0.500kg

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