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E-Learning and the Science of Instruction

Richard E Mayer
E-Learning and the Science of Instruction

E-Learning and the Science of Instruction

Richard E Mayer

$66.99

Hardback
In "e-Learning and the Science of Instruction" authors Ruth Colvin Clark and Richard E. Mayer-- internationally recognized experts in the field of e-learning-- offer essential information and guidelines for selecting, designing, and developing e-learning courses that build knowledge and skills for workers learning in corporate, government, and academic settings.

- Publisher Acknowledgements.Preface.Introduction.1. e-Learning: Promise and Pitfalls.The e-Learning Bandwagon.What Is e-Learning?e-Learning Development Process.Two Types of e-Learning Goals: Inform and Perform.Is e-Learning Better? Media Comparison Research.What Makes e-Learning Unique.e-Learning: The Pitfalls.What Is Good e-Courseware?Three Types of e-Learning.e-Learning to Support Human Learning Processes.2. How People Learn from E-Courses.How Do People Learn?How e-Lessons Affect Human Learning.What Is Good Research?3. Applying the Multimedia Principle: Use Words and Graphics Rather Than Words Alone.Multimedia Principle: Include Both Words and Graphics.Psychological Reasons for the Multimedia Principle.Evidence for Using Words and Pictures.4. Applying the Contiguity Principle: Place Corresponding Words and Graphics Near Each Other.Contiguity Principle: Place Printed Words Near Corresponding Graphics.Psychological Reasons for the Contiguity Principle.Evidence for Presenting Words at the Same Time as Corresponding Graphics.5. Applying the Modality Principle: Present Words as Audio Narration Rather Than Onscreen Text.Modality Principle: Present Words as Speech Rather Than Onscreen Text.Psychological Reasons for the Modality Principle.Evidence for Using Spoken Rather Than Printed Text.6. Applying the Redundancy Principle: Presenting Words in Both Text and Audio Narration Can Hurt Learning.Redundancy Principle One: Avoid Presenting Words as Narration and Identical Text in the Presence of Graphics.Psychological Reasons for the Redundancy Principle.Evidence for Omitting Redundant Onscreen Text.Redundancy Principle Two: Consider the Narration of Onscreen Text in Special Situations.Psychological Reasons for Exceptions to Redundancy Principle.Evidence for Including Redundant Onscreen Words.7. Applying the Coherence Principle: Adding Interesting Material Can Hurt Learning.Coherence Principle One: Avoid e-Lessons with Extraneous Sounds.Psychological Reasons to Avoid Extraneous Sounds.Evidence for Omitting Extraneous Sounds.Coherence Principle Two: Avoid e-Lessons with Extraneous Pictures.Psychological Reasons to Avoid Interesting but Extraneous Graphics.Evidence for Omitting Extraneous Graphics.Coherence Principle Three: Avoid e-Lessons with Extraneous Words.Psychological Reasons to Minimize Words in e-Learning.Evidence for Omitting Extraneous Words.8. Applying the Personalization Principle: Use Conversational Style and Virtual Coaches.Personalization Principle One: Use Conversational Rather Than Formal Style.Psychological Reasons for the Personalization Principle.Evidence for Using Conversational Style.Personalization Principle Two: Use Onscreen Coaches to Promote Learning.9. Does Practice Make Perfect?Design of Practice in e-Learning.Practice Principle One: Interactions Should Mirror the Job.Psychological Reasons for Job-Relevant Practice.Evidence for the Benefits of Practice.Practice Principle Two: Critical Tasks Require More Practice.Psychological Reasons for Multiple Distributed Practice Exercises.The Evidence for Multiple Distributed Practice Exercises.Practice Principle Three: Apply the Media Elements Principles to Practice Exercises.Practice Principle Four: Train Learners to Self-Question During Receptive e-Lessons.Psychological Reasons for Training Self-Questioning Skills.Evidence for Training Self-Questioning.10. Leveraging Examples in e-Learning.Worked Examples: Fuel for Learning.Worked Example Principle One: Replace Some Practice Problems with Worked Examples.Psychological Reasons for Using Worked Examples.Evidence for Benefits of Worked Examples.Worked Example Principle Two: Apply the Media Eleme

- Publisher

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About "E-Learning and the Science of Instruction"

In "e-Learning and the Science of Instruction" authors Ruth Colvin Clark and Richard E. Mayer-- internationally recognized experts in the field of e-learning-- offer essential information and guidelines for selecting, designing, and developing e-learning courses that build knowledge and skills for workers learning in corporate, government, and academic settings.
- Publisher

Acknowledgements.Preface.Introduction.1. e-Learning: Promise and Pitfalls.The e-Learning Bandwagon.What Is e-Learning?e-Learning Development Process.Two Types of e-Learning Goals: Inform and Perform.Is e-Learning Better? Media Comparison Research.What Makes e-Learning Unique.e-Learning: The Pitfalls.What Is Good e-Courseware?Three Types of e-Learning.e-Learning to Support Human Learning Processes.2. How People Learn from E-Courses.How Do People Learn?How e-Lessons Affect Human Learning.What Is Good Research?3. Applying the Multimedia Principle: Use Words and Graphics Rather Than Words Alone.Multimedia Principle: Include Both Words and Graphics.Psychological Reasons for the Multimedia Principle.Evidence for Using Words and Pictures.4. Applying the Contiguity Principle: Place Corresponding Words and Graphics Near Each Other.Contiguity Principle: Place Printed Words Near Corresponding Graphics.Psychological Reasons for the Contiguity Principle.Evidence for Presenting Words at the Same Time as Corresponding Graphics.5. Applying the Modality Principle: Present Words as Audio Narration Rather Than Onscreen Text.Modality Principle: Present Words as Speech Rather Than Onscreen Text.Psychological Reasons for the Modality Principle.Evidence for Using Spoken Rather Than Printed Text.6. Applying the Redundancy Principle: Presenting Words in Both Text and Audio Narration Can Hurt Learning.Redundancy Principle One: Avoid Presenting Words as Narration and Identical Text in the Presence of Graphics.Psychological Reasons for the Redundancy Principle.Evidence for Omitting Redundant Onscreen Text.Redundancy Principle Two: Consider the Narration of Onscreen Text in Special Situations.Psychological Reasons for Exceptions to Redundancy Principle.Evidence for Including Redundant Onscreen Words.7. Applying the Coherence Principle: Adding Interesting Material Can Hurt Learning.Coherence Principle One: Avoid e-Lessons with Extraneous Sounds.Psychological Reasons to Avoid Extraneous Sounds.Evidence for Omitting Extraneous Sounds.Coherence Principle Two: Avoid e-Lessons with Extraneous Pictures.Psychological Reasons to Avoid Interesting but Extraneous Graphics.Evidence for Omitting Extraneous Graphics.Coherence Principle Three: Avoid e-Lessons with Extraneous Words.Psychological Reasons to Minimize Words in e-Learning.Evidence for Omitting Extraneous Words.8. Applying the Personalization Principle: Use Conversational Style and Virtual Coaches.Personalization Principle One: Use Conversational Rather Than Formal Style.Psychological Reasons for the Personalization Principle.Evidence for Using Conversational Style.Personalization Principle Two: Use Onscreen Coaches to Promote Learning.9. Does Practice Make Perfect?Design of Practice in e-Learning.Practice Principle One: Interactions Should Mirror the Job.Psychological Reasons for Job-Relevant Practice.Evidence for the Benefits of Practice.Practice Principle Two: Critical Tasks Require More Practice.Psychological Reasons for Multiple Distributed Practice Exercises.The Evidence for Multiple Distributed Practice Exercises.Practice Principle Three: Apply the Media Elements Principles to Practice Exercises.Practice Principle Four: Train Learners to Self-Question During Receptive e-Lessons.Psychological Reasons for Training Self-Questioning Skills.Evidence for Training Self-Questioning.10. Leveraging Examples in e-Learning.Worked Examples: Fuel for Learning.Worked Example Principle One: Replace Some Practice Problems with Worked Examples.Psychological Reasons for Using Worked Examples.Evidence for Benefits of Worked Examples.Worked Example Principle Two: Apply the Media Eleme
- Publisher

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 210975
  • Product Code 0787960519
  • EAN 9780787960513
  • Pages 336
  • Department Academic
  • Category Reference
  • Sub-Category Textbook
  • Publisher Jossey Bass
  • Publication Date Oct 2002
  • Dimensions 243 x 185 x 32 mm
  • Weight 0.801kg

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