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First Corinthians: An Exegetical and Explanatory Commentary

First Corinthians: An Exegetical and Explanatory Commentary

$55.99

Paperback

This book is one of Paul's major writings, not only because of its length but because of its subject matter. Indeed we can note that every major doctrine in the New Testament is given its most thorough consideration and exposition in either this Epistle or Romans (or both). And Romans was written from Corinth only about two years after 1 Corinthians.

^^^There are basically two reasons for writing this commentary. First, because on numerous issues some of the great writers and exegetes of the past have shown wisdom and insight in their understanding of Paul's message in this Epistle, while many modern commentators have gone in a different direction.

^Additionally, though, it seems to me that there are also places in this Epistle where some further reflection upon the text is warranted. Translational traditions have grown up which result in each new translation that is published following the same approach to a passage, when that approach and interpretation may validly be open to question. Related to this, there are places where most of the mainstream versions (or a significant number of them) have a very "interpretational" approach to the translation of a passage, and I do not consider this interpretation to be quite so settled. Or at least the translation should be made more neutral where the Greek leaves the meaning more open, or certainly the issue should be aired and readers alerted to the fact that the matter is not as clear cut and definite as some versions imply - that in fact it warrants further consideration.

^^We can for example see numerous instances along these lines in a comparison of recent "committee" translations such as the ESV, NIV, NKJV, REB, and NRSV with other and more "independent" translations like J B Phillips and Richmond Lattimore and those of particular scholars in their commentaries.

^Then in commentaries themselves, it is salutory to compare a major "new" commentary on 1 Corinthians such as that by David Garland, in the Baker Exegetical Commentary series on the New Testament (published 2003) with an older "traditional" commentary like that of Charles Hodge, first published in 1857, but still in print. (It is, I think, instructive that Garland does not refer to Hodge at all, though he cites a very considerable number of other commentaries.)
-Publisher.

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About "First Corinthians: An Exegetical and Explanatory Commentary"

This book is one of Paul's major writings, not only because of its length but because of its subject matter. Indeed we can note that every major doctrine in the New Testament is given its most thorough consideration and exposition in either this Epistle or Romans (or both). And Romans was written from Corinth only about two years after 1 Corinthians.

^^^There are basically two reasons for writing this commentary. First, because on numerous issues some of the great writers and exegetes of the past have shown wisdom and insight in their understanding of Paul's message in this Epistle, while many modern commentators have gone in a different direction.

^Additionally, though, it seems to me that there are also places in this Epistle where some further reflection upon the text is warranted. Translational traditions have grown up which result in each new translation that is published following the same approach to a passage, when that approach and interpretation may validly be open to question. Related to this, there are places where most of the mainstream versions (or a significant number of them) have a very "interpretational" approach to the translation of a passage, and I do not consider this interpretation to be quite so settled. Or at least the translation should be made more neutral where the Greek leaves the meaning more open, or certainly the issue should be aired and readers alerted to the fact that the matter is not as clear cut and definite as some versions imply - that in fact it warrants further consideration.

^^We can for example see numerous instances along these lines in a comparison of recent "committee" translations such as the ESV, NIV, NKJV, REB, and NRSV with other and more "independent" translations like J B Phillips and Richmond Lattimore and those of particular scholars in their commentaries.

^Then in commentaries themselves, it is salutory to compare a major "new" commentary on 1 Corinthians such as that by David Garland, in the Baker Exegetical Commentary series on the New Testament (published 2003) with an older "traditional" commentary like that of Charles Hodge, first published in 1857, but still in print. (It is, I think, instructive that Garland does not refer to Hodge at all, though he cites a very considerable number of other commentaries.)
-Publisher.


- Koorong

In most areas of this Epistle, B. Ward Powers has come to share the interpretation of Paul's meaning held by the Early Church Fathers; although he explains and expounds those views. This is particularly the case in relation to chapters 12 through 14 where, in keeping with the Early Church Fathers, the Reformers, most Scripture expositors until recent times, and many present-day exegetes, Powers expounds the interpretation that tongues refers to human languages spoken on earth. The one major area where Powers parts company with the Fathers of the first Christian centuries is in relation to matters of sex and marriage, divorce and remarriage, and attitudes to women generally. Here Powers explains that Paul is more affirming of sex, marriage and remarriage, and women than many early writers (and some modern writers) have understood him to be. We need at times to take considerable care, he writes, to understand the meaning of what Paul says to the Corinthians, and in coming to terms with how this teaching is to apply to us in today's world. But when we have arrived at our understanding of these things, then there is no question: this is the Word of God to us, and we must take it very seriously indeed. We cannot just dismiss it offhandedly and simply say, 'Well, that is just Paul's opinion, and we can take it or leave it.' Not at all: Paul has explained clearly that what he writes comes with the inspiration and authority of the Holy Spirit of God.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Ward Powers

Rev Dr B Ward Powers, (Ph.D., University of London): an ordained Anglican minister, formerly on the Faculty of Moore Theological College (where he inaugurated the College's Th.C. correspondence course), and (12 years) on the Faculty of Sydney Missionary & Bible College, Sydney. He is currently Director of Tyndale College, The Australasian Open Theological College and author of Learn To Read the Greek New Testament, Marriage and Divorce; The New Testament Teaching and The Ministry of Women in the Church and First Corinthians: An Exegetical and Explanatory Commentary.
Koorong -Editorial Review.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 293438
  • Product Code 9781556359330
  • ISBN 1556359330
  • EAN 9781556359330
  • Pages 481
  • Department Academic
  • Category New Testament Commentaries
  • Sub-Category 1 Corinthians
  • Publisher Wipf & Stock Publishers
  • Publication Date Jan 2009
  • Sales Rank #75749
  • Dimensions 228 x 152 x 28 mm
  • Weight 0.676kg

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