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Five Views on Apologetics (Counterpoints Series)

Five Views on Apologetics (Counterpoints Series)
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Five Views on Apologetics (Counterpoints Series)

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The goal of apologetics is to persuasively answer honest objections that keep people from faith in Christ. But of the several approaches, which is most effective? With a forum format, this book puts five views under the microscope: Classical, Evidential, Presuppositional, Reformed Epistemology, and Cumulative Case. Contributors: William Lane Craig, Gary Habermas, John Frame, Kelly James Clark and Paul Feinberg. 398 pages, from Zondervan.

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About "Five Views on Apologetics (Counterpoints Series)"

The goal of apologetics is to persuasively answer honest objections that keep people from faith in Christ. But of the several approaches, which is most effective? With a forum format, this book puts five views under the microscope: Classical, Evidential, Presuppositional, Reformed Epistemology, and Cumulative Case. Contributors: William Lane Craig, Gary Habermas, John Frame, Kelly James Clark and Paul Feinberg. 398 pages, from Zondervan.
- Koorong

The goal of apologetics is to persuasively answer honest objections that keep people from faith in Jesus Christ. But of several apologetic approaches, which is most effective?Five Views on Apologetics examines the "how-to" of apologetics, putting five prominent views under the microscope: Classical, Evidential, Presuppositional, Reformed Epistemology, and Cumulative Case. Offering a forum for presentation, critique, and defense, this book allows the contributors for the different viewpoints to interact.Like no other book, Five Views on Apologetics lets you compare and contrast different ways of "doing" apologetics. Your own informed conclusions can then guide you as you meet the questions of a needy world with the claims of the gospel.The Counterpoints series provides a forum for comparison and critique of different views on issues important to Christians. Counterpoints books address two categories: Church Life and Exploring Theology. Complete your library with other books in the Coun
- Publisher

Meet the Authors

Stanley Gundry (Ed)

Stanley N. Gundry is senior vice president and editor-in-chief of the book group at Zondervan. With more than thirty-five years of teaching, pastoring, and publishing experience, he is the author or coauthor of numerous books and a contributor to numerous periodicals.

Steven B Cowan (Ed)

Steven B. Cowan (M.Div.; Ph.D.) is associate professor of Philosophy and Apologetics at Southeastern Bible College in Birmingham, AL.

William Lane Craig

William Lane Craig is Research Professor of Philosophy at Talbot School of Theology in La Mirada, California. He and his wife Jan have been married since 1971, and have two adult children.

Dr. Craig was born in 1949, in Peoria, Illinois. From an early age, he proved to be a champion debater at school. At the age of sixteen as a junior in high school, he first heard the message of the Christian gospel and yielded his life to Christ.

Dr. Craig pursued his undergraduate studies at Wheaton College (B.A. 1971) and graduate studies at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (M.A. 1974; M.A. 1975), the University of Birmingham (England) (Ph.D. 1977), and the University of Munich (Germany) (D.Theol. 1984). From 1980-86 he taught Philosophy of Religion at Trinity, during which time he and Jan started their family. In 1987 they moved to Brussels, Belgium, where Dr. Craig pursued research at the University of Louvain until assuming his position at Talbot in 1994.

Dr Craig has emerged as one of the most redoubtable defenders of Christian truth at the top levels of academic philosophy in our time. He has publicly debated theologians, biblical scholars, philosophers, scientists, and various pundits on matters of Christian truth, including Antony Flew, Lawrence Krauss, Marcus Borg, Gerd Ludemann, Bart Ehrman, Christopher Hitchens, and several prominent Muslim apologists. Richard Dawkins has refused to debate with him.

Dr Craig has authored or edited over thirty books, including The Kalam Cosmological Argument, which has prompted more articles in contemporary philosophical journals than any other current argument for God's existence; also Assessing the New Testament Evidence for the Historicity of the Resurrection of Jesus; Divine Foreknowledge and Human Freedom; Theism, Atheism and Big Bang Cosmology; and God, Time and Eternity, as well as over a hundred articles in professional journals of philosophy and theology, including The Journal of Philosophy, New Testament Studies, Journal for the Study of the New Testament, American Philosophical Quarterly, Philosophical Studies, Philosophy, and British Journal for Philosophy of Science.

Gary R Habermas

Gary R. Habermas (Ph.D., Michigan State University) is Distinguished Research Professor and chair of the department of philosophy and theology at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. He is the author, co-author or editor of twenty-seven books including Resurrected? An Atheist & Deist Dialogue (with A. Flew), The Case for the Resurrection of Jesus (with M. Licona), The Risen Jesus & Future Hope; The Resurrection: Heart of New Testament Doctrine and The Resurrection: Heart of the Christian Life.

John M Frame

Dr. John M. Frame (M.A., M.Phil., Yale University) is Professor of Systematic Theology and Philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary. An outstanding theologian, John Frame distinguished himself during 31 years on the faculty of Westminster Theological Seminary, and was a founding faculty member of WTS California.

He is best known for his prolific writings including ten volumes, a contributor to many books and reference volumes, as well as scholarly articles and magazines. Rev. Frame is a talented musician and discerning media critic who is deeply committed to the work of ministry and training pastors.

His select publications include Apologetics to the Glory of God (1994); Cornelius Van Til: An Analysis of his Thought (1995); Worship in Spirit and Truth (1996), and Contemporary Music: a Biblical Defense (1997), and his recent major works in the Theology of Lordship series The Doctrine of God; The Doctrine of the Knowledge of God; Doctrine of the Christian Life and The Doctrine of the Word of God.
Koorong -Editorial Review.

Kelly James Clark

Kelly James Clark is associate professor at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Paul Feinberg

Paul D. Feinberg, (ThD, Dallas Theological Seminary) was professor of biblical and systematic theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School.

Table Of Contents

  • Contents
  • Introduction: Steven B. Cowan
  • Glossary Of Key Terms And Concepts
  • 1. Classical Apologetics
  • William Lane Craig
  • Responses
  • Gary R. Habermas
  • Paul D. Feinberg
  • John M. Frame
  • Kelly James Clark
  • 2. Evidential Apologetics
  • Gary R. Habermas
  • Responses
  • William Lane Craig
  • Paul D. Feinberg
  • John M. Frame
  • Kelly James Clark
  • 3. Cumulative Case Apologetics
  • Paul D. Feinberg
  • Responses
  • William Lane Craig
  • Gary R. Habermas
  • John M. Frame
  • Kelly James Clark
  • 4. Presuppositional Apologetics
  • John M. Frame
  • Responses
  • William Lane Craig
  • Gary R. Habermas
  • Paul D. Feinberg
  • Kelly James Clark
  • 5. Reformed Epistemology Apologetics
  • Kelly James Clark
  • Responses
  • William Lane Craig
  • Gary R. Habermas
  • Paul D. Feinberg
  • John M. Frame
  • 6. Closing Remarks
  • William Lane Craig
  • Gary R. Habermas
  • Paul D. Feinberg
  • John M. Frame
  • Kelly James Clark
  • Conclusion: Steven B. Cowan
  • About The Contributors
  • Scripture Index
  • Person Index
  • Subject Index

Excerpt

Excerpt from: Five Views on Apologetics (Counterpoints Series)

Introduction Steven B. Cowan Fairly early in my life as a Christian --- somewhere in my late teens, I think --- I discovered apologetics. This discovery was very timely because I had also discovered that the faith I had in Christ was not shared by everyone. In fact, I discovered that some people outright rejected, even ridiculed, my faith. What's more, I found out that skeptics had raised arguments against my faith. And being the inquisitive fellow that I am (I hate unanswered questions!), I wondered myself, quite apart from all of these skeptical challenges, what reason or reasons there might be for believing the religious beliefs that I embraced. Thus, Paul Little's little book, Know Why You Believe, and Josh McDowell's Evidence That Demands a Verdict came at an appropriate time in my life, introducing me to apologetics. And from Little and McDowell, I jumped right into Sproul, Gerstner, and Lindsley's Classical Apologetics --- the book that sparked an insatiable thirst in me for apologetics, philosophy, and theology. No sooner had I discovered apologetics, however, than I also uncovered the fact that not every apologist did apologetics the same way. It was Sproul, Gerstner, and Lindsley's fault, if the truth be known. They distinguished between something they called 'classical apologetics' and this bogeyman called 'pre-suppositionalism.' And I soon discovered that there were other varieties of apologetic methods as well, and that the disagreements between them could sometimes be sharp. As a young college student, I had a hard time trying to figure out who was right and who was wrong in this debate. I distinctly remember (this was in the early 1980s) wishing that someone would publish one of those 'multiple views' books on apologetic methodology so that I could see all the different views side by side and have an easier time making up my own mind. I waited and waited for well over a decade, and no such book appeared. Then I decided to do it myself! And Zondervan has been gracious enough to assist me. The Nature of Apologetics This is a book about apologetic methodology, not a book of apologetics per se. That is, it is not a book that seeks to do apologetics as much as a book that discusses how one ought to do apologetics. But for the sake of some of our readers, it may help at this point to spell out what apologetics is. Apologetics is concerned with the defense of the Christian faith against charges of falsehood, inconsistency, or credulity. Indeed, the very word apologetics is derived from the Greek apologia, which means 'defense.' It was a term used in the courts of law in the ancient world. Socrates, for example, gave his famous 'apology,' or defense, before the court of Athens. And the apostle Paul defended himself (apologeomai) before the Roman officials (Acts 24:10; 25:8). As it concerns the Christian faith, then, apologetics has to do with defending, or making a case for, the truth of the Christian faith. It is an intellectual discipline that is usually said to serve at least two purposes: (1) to bolster the faith of Christian believers, and (2) to aid in the task of evangelism. Apologists seek to accomplish these goals in two distinct ways. One is by refuting objections to the Christian faith, such as the problem of evil or the charge that key Christian doctrines (e.g., the Trinity, incarnation, etc.) are incoherent. This apologetic task can be called negative or defensive apologetics. The second, perhaps complementary, way apologists fulfill their purposes is by offering positive reasons for Christian faith. The latter, called positive or offensive apologetics, often takes the form of arguments for God's existence or for the resurrection and deity of Christ but are by no means limited to these. Of course, some apologists, as we will see, contend that such arguments are unnecessary or perhaps even detrimental to Christian faith. These apologists focus primarily on the negative task and downplay the role of positive apologetics. Nevertheless, most, if not all, would agree that the apologetic task includes the giving of some positive reasons for faith. The Question of Taxonomy Although apologists agree on the basic definition and goals of apologetics, they can differ significantly on the proper methodology of apologetics. That is, they disagree about how the apologist goes about his task --- about the kinds of arguments that can and should be employed and about the way the apologist should engage the unbeliever in apologetic discourse. To use a military analogy, differences of opinion exist regarding the best strategy to use in defending the faith. These differences in apologetic strategy usually turn upon more basic disagreements with regard to important philosophical and theological issues. This leads me to the question of taxonomy. How do we delineate the different approaches to apologetics? Of all the other books on apologetic methodology, no two classify the various methods in exactly the same way. For example, Gordon Lewis classifies apologetic methods according to their respective religious epistemologies. He distinguishes them by what each one takes to be the correct approach to acquiring knowledge of religious truths. On this basis, he differentiates six apologetic methods. Religious epistemology can be the decisive factor in distinguishing one apologetic method from another. For example, two of the methods Lewis distinguishes are pure empiricism, defended by J. Oliver Buswell Jr., and rationalism, defended by Gordon H. Clark. Buswell's methodology requires us to make observations of the world and draw causal inferences from those observations, which, he believes, will lead the objective observer to belief in God and in the truth of the Christian faith. He uses the classical theistic arguments and appeals to historical evidences for the resurrection of Jesus. Clark, on the other hand, repudiates the use of such arguments and evidences, largely on epistemological grounds. Instead, he argues that the apologist must begin with Scripture as a first principle. That is, Scripture serves as a rational axiom by which all other truth claims are tested. Clark then argues that Christianity is the only coherent system, all other worldviews being logically inconsistent. Thus, the religious epistemologies of these two apologists lead them to very different apologetic approaches.

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Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 143856
  • Product Code 0310224764
  • EAN 9780310224761
  • UPC 025986224769
  • Pages 400
  • Department Academic
  • Category Apologetic
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Zondervan
  • Publication Date Feb 2000
  • Sales Rank #4029
  • Dimensions 203 x 136 x 28 mm
  • Weight 0.335kg

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