Back to Top
Our Stores Contact Us Help
Welcome, {{username}} Log Out Log In   /  Sign Up

Genesis

Bill Moyers
Genesis

Genesis

Bill Moyers

$42.99

Hardback
The stories in the Book of Genesis captured our ancestors' imagination thousands of years ago--and they speak to us today. In Genesis, acclaimed television journalist Bill Moyers explores the contemporary relevance of the ageless wisdom from the Bible's epic first book. Creation, temptation, murder, exile, and family strife--these themes emerge from every page of Genesis as fresh as the morning headlines or the evening news. Genesis invites readers into a lively and accessible discussion of the manifold meanings of these stories, and engages us in a fascinating exploration of the relationship between interpreter and text. Among the four dozen writers, theologians, artists, and thinkers in the series are Mary Gordon, John Barth, Faye Kellerman, Samuel D. Proctor, Phyllis Trible, Avivah Gottlieb Zornberg, Walter Brueggemann, Robert Alter, Oscar Hijuelos, Leon R. Kass, Elaine H. Pagels, Charles Johnson, Stephen Mitchell, Bharati Mukherjee, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Elizabeth Swados, Burton L. Visotzky, and Renita J. Weems--a dazzling, multilayered chorus of voices.

- Publisher It was reported to be "the best conversation" in town. Deciding to check it out for myself, late one afternoon I made my way up to the Jewish Theological Seminary of America at the corner of Broadway and 122nd Street, across from Union Theological Seminary and a few blocks north of Columbia University. There, around a long plain table in a modest basement room, sat a score of people, talking. I recognized among them a film critic, a screenwriter, a poet, an editor, an essayist and novelist, and a smattering of biblical scholars, Jewish and Christian. Their leader was a bearded man whose intense dark eyes moved swiftly from speaker to speaker, as if he had scored so many tennis matches he could instinctively anticipate the action. And action there was, if the play of ideas is the game you love. They were talking about Genesis, the first book of the Bible, whose stories have inspired three of the world's enduring religions and the spiritual, ethical, and literary imagination of Western civilization. What stories they are! We are swept from the creation of the world through the founding of Israel, from the architecture of the cosmos to the intrigues of the patriarchs, from Adam and Eve naked in the Garden to Joseph strutting in his coat of many colors. From fratricide to reconciliation they carry us, in a narrative saga that opens with "In the beginning God" and concludes "in a coffin in Egypt." The participants this evening were making the most of it. No speeches, proclamations, or declamations: This was conversation, the kind you wish would happen at Sunday dinner. They were listening, responding, questioning, amending, inquiring, challenging--sometimes with wit, a wink, an eyebrow lifted; never with feigned agreement for agreement's sake and always with good-natured civility. I heard them wrestling not only with what the stories might have meant to the first people who heard them thousands of years ago, but with how those ancient stories connect to everyday life today. As they talked, this ordinary, unadorned room became for these few hours a place of creative incubation. The writer Cynthia Ozick has said of her experience there: "What goes on in this room is more exciting to me than anything that ever happened. It's as if the text really matters." This is what their leader, Rabbi Burton Visotzky, had intended when he organized the Genesis seminar in the early 1980s. By shrewdly constructing these monthly sessions as workshops where people do midrash--the Jewish tradition of "searching out," through commentary, the contemporary application of the Bible to life--Rabbi Visotzky challenged his participants to ask of the stories, "What do they mean for us, now, in our lives, nearing the end of the twentieth century? How do they help us make sense of the world today?" Even now, he explains to newcomers, "the communal study of the Bible can continue to provide us with a means for clarifying our ideas about the world around us and for linking them historically to a long-standing tradition." It is in this shared reading and rereading that the Bible "ceases to be just another book, gathering dust on the shelf. In a community of readers a conversation takes place. The give-and-take of interpretation creates an extra voice in the room, the sound of Reading the Book." When this happens, the Bible speaks "not only to each community of readers, be they Jewish, Christian, or any other flavor, but to all humanity." To test these ideas, Rabbi Visotzky opened his Genesis seminar to a motley assortment of readers--laity and biblical scholars alike. All interpretations would be given a hearing, so that different points of view might expand every participant's ability to hear the nuances of the text. "It doesn't matter whether the reading of Scripture is traditional or modern, fundamentalist or critical, Christian or Muslim or

- Publisher IN

- Publisher

You May Also Be Interested In

About "Genesis"

The stories in the Book of Genesis captured our ancestors' imagination thousands of years ago--and they speak to us today. In Genesis, acclaimed television journalist Bill Moyers explores the contemporary relevance of the ageless wisdom from the Bible's epic first book. Creation, temptation, murder, exile, and family strife--these themes emerge from every page of Genesis as fresh as the morning headlines or the evening news. Genesis invites readers into a lively and accessible discussion of the manifold meanings of these stories, and engages us in a fascinating exploration of the relationship between interpreter and text. Among the four dozen writers, theologians, artists, and thinkers in the series are Mary Gordon, John Barth, Faye Kellerman, Samuel D. Proctor, Phyllis Trible, Avivah Gottlieb Zornberg, Walter Brueggemann, Robert Alter, Oscar Hijuelos, Leon R. Kass, Elaine H. Pagels, Charles Johnson, Stephen Mitchell, Bharati Mukherjee, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Elizabeth Swados, Burton L. Visotzky, and Renita J. Weems--a dazzling, multilayered chorus of voices.
- Publisher

It was reported to be "the best conversation" in town. Deciding to check it out for myself, late one afternoon I made my way up to the Jewish Theological Seminary of America at the corner of Broadway and 122nd Street, across from Union Theological Seminary and a few blocks north of Columbia University. There, around a long plain table in a modest basement room, sat a score of people, talking. I recognized among them a film critic, a screenwriter, a poet, an editor, an essayist and novelist, and a smattering of biblical scholars, Jewish and Christian. Their leader was a bearded man whose intense dark eyes moved swiftly from speaker to speaker, as if he had scored so many tennis matches he could instinctively anticipate the action. And action there was, if the play of ideas is the game you love. They were talking about Genesis, the first book of the Bible, whose stories have inspired three of the world's enduring religions and the spiritual, ethical, and literary imagination of Western civilization. What stories they are! We are swept from the creation of the world through the founding of Israel, from the architecture of the cosmos to the intrigues of the patriarchs, from Adam and Eve naked in the Garden to Joseph strutting in his coat of many colors. From fratricide to reconciliation they carry us, in a narrative saga that opens with "In the beginning God" and concludes "in a coffin in Egypt." The participants this evening were making the most of it. No speeches, proclamations, or declamations: This was conversation, the kind you wish would happen at Sunday dinner. They were listening, responding, questioning, amending, inquiring, challenging--sometimes with wit, a wink, an eyebrow lifted; never with feigned agreement for agreement's sake and always with good-natured civility. I heard them wrestling not only with what the stories might have meant to the first people who heard them thousands of years ago, but with how those ancient stories connect to everyday life today. As they talked, this ordinary, unadorned room became for these few hours a place of creative incubation. The writer Cynthia Ozick has said of her experience there: "What goes on in this room is more exciting to me than anything that ever happened. It's as if the text really matters." This is what their leader, Rabbi Burton Visotzky, had intended when he organized the Genesis seminar in the early 1980s. By shrewdly constructing these monthly sessions as workshops where people do midrash--the Jewish tradition of "searching out," through commentary, the contemporary application of the Bible to life--Rabbi Visotzky challenged his participants to ask of the stories, "What do they mean for us, now, in our lives, nearing the end of the twentieth century? How do they help us make sense of the world today?" Even now, he explains to newcomers, "the communal study of the Bible can continue to provide us with a means for clarifying our ideas about the world around us and for linking them historically to a long-standing tradition." It is in this shared reading and rereading that the Bible "ceases to be just another book, gathering dust on the shelf. In a community of readers a conversation takes place. The give-and-take of interpretation creates an extra voice in the room, the sound of Reading the Book." When this happens, the Bible speaks "not only to each community of readers, be they Jewish, Christian, or any other flavor, but to all humanity." To test these ideas, Rabbi Visotzky opened his Genesis seminar to a motley assortment of readers--laity and biblical scholars alike. All interpretations would be given a hearing, so that different points of view might expand every participant's ability to hear the nuances of the text. "It doesn't matter whether the reading of Scripture is traditional or modern, fundamentalist or critical, Christian or Muslim or
- Publisher

IN
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Bill Moyers

Bill Moyers, June 5, 1934 - Bill Moyers was born in Hugo, Oklahoma, on June 5, 1934. He attended North Texas State College, the University of Texas at Austin, earning his Bachelor's Degree in Journalism in 1956, the University of Edinburgh in Scotland from 1956 to 1957 and the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas in 1959. After college, Moyers joined the staff of Senator Lyndon B. Johnson as his personal assistant, from 1960 to 1961. From 1961 to 1962, Moyers was the associate director of public affairs for the Peace Corps, and deputy director of the Peace Corps in 1963. He later joined Johnson again, this time as special assistant to the President, from 1963 to 1967. He became the Press Secretary, in 1965 until 1967. That same year, he began as publisher of Newsday, holding the position until 1970. He then became producer and editor of the Bill Moyers' Journal for PBS from 1971-76, and an anchor for USA: People and Politics from 1978 till 1981. In 1976 he joined CBS as chief correspondent for CBS Reports for two years. He was the senior news analyst for CBS News from 1981 to 1986 and has been executive editor of Public Affairs Programming Inc. since 1986. Over the course of his many years in journalism, Bill Moyers has earned and received many awards and honors, among them, an Honorary doctorate, from the American Film Institute; numerous Emmy Awards; the Ralph Lowell medal for contribution to public television; George Peabody awards, 1976, 1980, 1985-86, 1988-90; DuPont/Columbia Silver Baton award, 1979, 1986, 1988; Gold Baton award, 1991; and the George Polk awards, 1981, 1986.

Table Of Contents

  • In

Unavailable. Out of Print. Only available while stock lasts.

Out of Print
Quantity

Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 112469
  • Product Code 0385483457
  • EAN 9780385483452
  • Pages 5
  • Department Academic
  • Category Biblical Studies
  • Sub-Category Old Testament
  • Publisher Doubleday
  • Publication Date Sep 1996
  • Dimensions 248 x 190 x 33 mm
  • Weight 0.102kg

Bestsellers in Biblical Studies