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Gifts of the Desert

Kyriacos C Markides

Gifts of the Desert

Kyriacos C Markides

$35.99

Hardback
One JOURNEY to SEDONA It was dark when we entered Sedona, named after the wife of the nineteenth-century postmaster who helped keep the settlers in contact with the rest of the world. The relatively few neon lights testified to Sedona's reputation as a "New Age mecca," a center for alternative health practitioners and a mosaic of new religious movements. As we drove slowly through the downtown area to get a first glimpse of the place, I felt for a moment as if I had just entered Corinth during Saint Paul's time. All the street lights were unusually dim, offering minimal illumination for pedestrians. Our friend Pat, who, together with her husband, Philip, had picked us up at the airport explained that the city council, wisely, had passed ordinances to protect the night from artificial light pollution. People could still look up and gaze at the Milky Way and experience the massive presence of the mountains, mute and silent, surrounding the desert town. "Too much luminosity at night obstructs our capacity to reflect and contemplate our relationship to God and our place in the universe," Philip announced as he pressed the brakes at a stoplight. His comment brought to my mind an experience I shared with my wife Emily during a visit to the Sivananda Yoga Retreat on Paradise Island, Nassau. I had been invited there to give a presentation on the lives and teachings of Eastern Orthodox saints and sages. Among the speakers was an astronomer who showed slides of outer space taken by the Hubble telescope. We were profoundly moved by what we saw, awed by the magnificence and beauty of the physical universe. One stunning photo showed an endless expanse of galaxies, billions of them, that the Hubble telescope managed to capture on film. "You cannot see the colors now, but tomorrow, before your workshop, we will take you for a long hike," Pat promised. "You will then understand why we decided to settle here." When Mary and Joan, two former Catholic nuns who had recently migrated to Sedona from the Northwest, invited me to offer a workshop "The Forgotten Path of Mystical Christianity" I accepted at once. Colleagues and friends familiar with that region of the Southwest assured me that Sedona is a dream place and that the beauty of the land is indescribable and "beyond this world." There was another reason for accepting their invitation to fly from our home in Maine to Arizona. Southeast of Phoenix, at the heart of the Arizona desert, lay a recently established Greek Orthodox monastery named after Saint Anthony, the first Christian hermit, who spearheaded the monastic movement during the fourth century. I had heard unusual and controversial stories about the circumstances that led to the creation of the monastery, and being somewhat of a connoisseur and collector of extraordinary tales, I decided to go see it for myself. The monastery was set up during the mid-nineties. It was the creation of a venerated elder from Mount Athos, the inaccessible monastic republic in northern Greece and the subject matter of my research and writing during the previous ten years.1 A remnant of the Byzantine Empire, Mount Athos has served since the ninth century as a refuge for monks and hermits who, in that remote peninsula, preserved what many consider to be the mystical, holy tradition of early Christianity. It was, therefore, a unique opportunity for Emily and me to combine our journey to Sedona with a six-day retreat at Saint Anthony's monastery. Frequent visits to monasteries have not only been necessary for my research but also have served as a source of spiritual renewal and rejuvenation, a balancing act to an otherwise cerebral, academic lifestyle. We had contemplated for some time the possibility of visiting the Arizona monastery to hear firsthand the details of how such an unlikely institution popped up in the heart of an Ame

- Publisher In his previous book, "The Mountain of Silence, Markides introduced us to the essential spiritual nature of Eastern Orthodoxy in a series of lively conversations with Father Maximos the widely revered charismatic Orthodox bishop and former abbot of the isolated monastery on Mount Athos. In GIFTS OF THE DESERT, Markides continues his examination of Eastern Orthodox mystical teachings and practices and captures its living expression through visits to monasteries and hermitages in Greece and America and interviews with contemporary charismatic elders and eldresses.
Markides' pursuit of a deeper understanding of Orthodoxy takes him to the desert of Arizona and a stay at a new monastery in Sedona; to the island of Cyprus and a reunion with Father Maximos; on a pilgrimage to holy shrines aboard a cruise ship on the Aegean Sea; and finally to the legendary Mount Athos, home to more than two thousand Orthodox monks. Markides relates his journey and reflections in a captivating style as we

- Publisher In Kyriacos C. Markides's newest book, Eastern Orthodox mysticism meets Western Christianity as the internationally renowned author takes readers on a deep journey back in time to unveil the very roots of authentic spirituality. ^In his previous book "The Mountain of Silence," Markides introduced us to the essential spiritual nature of Eastern Orthodoxy in a series of lively conversations with Father Maximos, the widely revered charismatic Orthodox bishop and former abbot of the isolated monastery on Mount Athos. In "Gifts of the Desert," Markides continues his examination of Easter Orthodox mystical teachings and practices and captures its living expression through visits to monasteries and hermitages in Greece and America and interviews with contemporary charismatic elders, both male and female. ^Markides's pursuit of a deeper understanding of Orthodoxy takes him to the deserts of Arizona and a stay at a new monastery in Sedona; to the island of Cyprus and a reunion with Fathe

- Publisher

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About "Gifts of the Desert"

One JOURNEY to SEDONA It was dark when we entered Sedona, named after the wife of the nineteenth-century postmaster who helped keep the settlers in contact with the rest of the world. The relatively few neon lights testified to Sedona's reputation as a "New Age mecca," a center for alternative health practitioners and a mosaic of new religious movements. As we drove slowly through the downtown area to get a first glimpse of the place, I felt for a moment as if I had just entered Corinth during Saint Paul's time. All the street lights were unusually dim, offering minimal illumination for pedestrians. Our friend Pat, who, together with her husband, Philip, had picked us up at the airport explained that the city council, wisely, had passed ordinances to protect the night from artificial light pollution. People could still look up and gaze at the Milky Way and experience the massive presence of the mountains, mute and silent, surrounding the desert town. "Too much luminosity at night obstructs our capacity to reflect and contemplate our relationship to God and our place in the universe," Philip announced as he pressed the brakes at a stoplight. His comment brought to my mind an experience I shared with my wife Emily during a visit to the Sivananda Yoga Retreat on Paradise Island, Nassau. I had been invited there to give a presentation on the lives and teachings of Eastern Orthodox saints and sages. Among the speakers was an astronomer who showed slides of outer space taken by the Hubble telescope. We were profoundly moved by what we saw, awed by the magnificence and beauty of the physical universe. One stunning photo showed an endless expanse of galaxies, billions of them, that the Hubble telescope managed to capture on film. "You cannot see the colors now, but tomorrow, before your workshop, we will take you for a long hike," Pat promised. "You will then understand why we decided to settle here." When Mary and Joan, two former Catholic nuns who had recently migrated to Sedona from the Northwest, invited me to offer a workshop "The Forgotten Path of Mystical Christianity" I accepted at once. Colleagues and friends familiar with that region of the Southwest assured me that Sedona is a dream place and that the beauty of the land is indescribable and "beyond this world." There was another reason for accepting their invitation to fly from our home in Maine to Arizona. Southeast of Phoenix, at the heart of the Arizona desert, lay a recently established Greek Orthodox monastery named after Saint Anthony, the first Christian hermit, who spearheaded the monastic movement during the fourth century. I had heard unusual and controversial stories about the circumstances that led to the creation of the monastery, and being somewhat of a connoisseur and collector of extraordinary tales, I decided to go see it for myself. The monastery was set up during the mid-nineties. It was the creation of a venerated elder from Mount Athos, the inaccessible monastic republic in northern Greece and the subject matter of my research and writing during the previous ten years.1 A remnant of the Byzantine Empire, Mount Athos has served since the ninth century as a refuge for monks and hermits who, in that remote peninsula, preserved what many consider to be the mystical, holy tradition of early Christianity. It was, therefore, a unique opportunity for Emily and me to combine our journey to Sedona with a six-day retreat at Saint Anthony's monastery. Frequent visits to monasteries have not only been necessary for my research but also have served as a source of spiritual renewal and rejuvenation, a balancing act to an otherwise cerebral, academic lifestyle. We had contemplated for some time the possibility of visiting the Arizona monastery to hear firsthand the details of how such an unlikely institution popped up in the heart of an Ame
- Publisher

In his previous book, "The Mountain of Silence, Markides introduced us to the essential spiritual nature of Eastern Orthodoxy in a series of lively conversations with Father Maximos the widely revered charismatic Orthodox bishop and former abbot of the isolated monastery on Mount Athos. In GIFTS OF THE DESERT, Markides continues his examination of Eastern Orthodox mystical teachings and practices and captures its living expression through visits to monasteries and hermitages in Greece and America and interviews with contemporary charismatic elders and eldresses.
Markides' pursuit of a deeper understanding of Orthodoxy takes him to the desert of Arizona and a stay at a new monastery in Sedona; to the island of Cyprus and a reunion with Father Maximos; on a pilgrimage to holy shrines aboard a cruise ship on the Aegean Sea; and finally to the legendary Mount Athos, home to more than two thousand Orthodox monks. Markides relates his journey and reflections in a captivating style as we

- Publisher

In Kyriacos C. Markides's newest book, Eastern Orthodox mysticism meets Western Christianity as the internationally renowned author takes readers on a deep journey back in time to unveil the very roots of authentic spirituality. ^In his previous book "The Mountain of Silence," Markides introduced us to the essential spiritual nature of Eastern Orthodoxy in a series of lively conversations with Father Maximos, the widely revered charismatic Orthodox bishop and former abbot of the isolated monastery on Mount Athos. In "Gifts of the Desert," Markides continues his examination of Easter Orthodox mystical teachings and practices and captures its living expression through visits to monasteries and hermitages in Greece and America and interviews with contemporary charismatic elders, both male and female. ^Markides's pursuit of a deeper understanding of Orthodoxy takes him to the deserts of Arizona and a stay at a new monastery in Sedona; to the island of Cyprus and a reunion with Fathe
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Kyriacos C Markides

KYRIACOS C. MARKIDES is an internationally respected authority on esoteric Christianity. He has written several books on Christian mysticism, including "The Mountain of Silence, Riding with the Lion, "and "The Magus of Strovolos, "the first volume in a trilogy on healers and mystics. Dr. Markides is a professor of sociology at the University of Maine, where he lives with his wife, Emily.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 237365
  • Product Code 0385506635
  • EAN 9780385506632
  • Pages 370
  • Department Academic
  • Category Theology
  • Sub-Category Orthodox Church
  • Publisher Doubleday
  • Publication Date Oct 2005
  • Dimensions 240 x 162 x 28 mm
  • Weight 0.658kg

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