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God, Freedom and Evil

Alvin C Plantinga

God, Freedom and Evil

Alvin C Plantinga

$20.99

Paperback

In his discussion of natural theology (arguments to prove the existence of God) and natural atheology (arguments for the falsehood of theistic belief) Plantinga focuses on two of the traditional arguments: the ontological argument as an example of natural theology, and the problem of evil as the most important representative of natural atheology. Accessible to serious general readers.

Introduction
Part I NATURAL ATHEOLOGY

a. The Problem of Evil

1. The Question: Why Does God Permit Evil?
2. Does the Theist Contradict Himself?
3. Can We Show That There Is No Inconsistency Here?
4. The Free Will Defense
5. Was It within God's Power to Create Any Possible World He Pleased?
6. Could God Have Created a World Containing Moral Good but No Moral Evil
7. Transworld Depravity and Essence
8. The Free Will Defense Vindicated
9. Is God's Existence Compatible with the Amount of Moral Evil the World Contains?
10. Is God's Existence Compatible with Natural Evil?
11. Does the Existence of Evil Make It Unlikely That God Exists?
b. Other Atheological Arguments

Part II NATURAL THEOLOGY

a. The Cosmological Argument
b. The Teleological Argument
c. The Ontological Argument
1. Gaunilo's Objection
2. Anselm's Reply
3. Kant's Objection
4. The Irrelevance of Kant's Objection
5. The Argument Restated
6. Its Fatal Flaw
7. A Modal Version of the Argument
8. A Flaw in the Ointment
9. The Argument Restated
10. The Argument Triumphant

-Publisher.

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About "God, Freedom and Evil"

In his discussion of natural theology (arguments to prove the existence of God) and natural atheology (arguments for the falsehood of theistic belief) Plantinga focuses on two of the traditional arguments: the ontological argument as an example of natural theology, and the problem of evil as the most important representative of natural atheology. Accessible to serious general readers.

Introduction
Part I NATURAL ATHEOLOGY

a. The Problem of Evil

1. The Question: Why Does God Permit Evil?
2. Does the Theist Contradict Himself?
3. Can We Show That There Is No Inconsistency Here?
4. The Free Will Defense
5. Was It within God's Power to Create Any Possible World He Pleased?
6. Could God Have Created a World Containing Moral Good but No Moral Evil
7. Transworld Depravity and Essence
8. The Free Will Defense Vindicated
9. Is God's Existence Compatible with the Amount of Moral Evil the World Contains?
10. Is God's Existence Compatible with Natural Evil?
11. Does the Existence of Evil Make It Unlikely That God Exists?
b. Other Atheological Arguments

Part II NATURAL THEOLOGY

a. The Cosmological Argument
b. The Teleological Argument
c. The Ontological Argument
1. Gaunilo's Objection
2. Anselm's Reply
3. Kant's Objection
4. The Irrelevance of Kant's Objection
5. The Argument Restated
6. Its Fatal Flaw
7. A Modal Version of the Argument
8. A Flaw in the Ointment
9. The Argument Restated
10. The Argument Triumphant

-Publisher.


- Koorong

God, Freedom and Evil discusses and exemplifies philosophy of religion or philosophical reflection on central themes of religion.
- Publisher

In his discussion of natural theology (arguments to prove the existence of God) and natural atheology (arguments for the falsehood of theistic belief) Plantinga focuses on two of the traditional arguments: the ontological argument as an example of natural theology, and the problem of evil as the most important representative of natural atheology. Accessible to serious general readers.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Alvin C Plantinga

Alvin Plantinga (PhD., Yale) is John A. O'Brien Professor of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame is one of the most distinguished living Christian Philosophers. His original contribution to philosophy is found in his trilogy Warranted Christian Belief, Warrant: The Current Debate, and Warrant and Proper Function (all from Oxford University Press)), his other books include The Nature of Necessity (OUP 1979), God and Other Minds (Eerdmans), The Analytic Theist (Eerdmans), and Does God have a nature?

Customer Reviews For "God, Freedom and Evil"

Write Your Own Review
Water-tight reasoning
4 stars By JT, Dec 02 2012
I would love to give this book five stars, but, alas, I can't. There are major theological points that are left out in this book, but I don't think that we could expect too much more in a book on natural theology.
Plantinga skips almost no steps in his reasoning, which will assure thoughtful readers, concluding that belief in God is very reasonable indeed. It is not a particularly difficult book; it only requires that you concentrate and "think hard" on what is presented. Please read this book.
Highly recommended!
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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 33429
  • Product Code 0802817319
  • EAN 9780802817310
  • Pages 122
  • Department Academic
  • Category Philosophy
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Eerdmans
  • Publication Date Mar 1989
  • Sales Rank #23836
  • Dimensions 209 x 133 x 8 mm
  • Weight 0.141kg

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