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God, Gulliver, and Genocide

Claude Rawson

God, Gulliver, and Genocide

Claude Rawson

$179.29

Paperback
"Rawson's excellent book analyses 'the spectrum of aggressions' that exists between such figurative use of the language of extermination and its actual fulfillment in historical genocides over the last six centuries."--The Guardian" "[An] erudite, passionate book...learned, wide-ranging and acute.... [Rawson is] one of the finest 18th-century specialists, who...is also a critic of striking flair and delicacy."--Terry Eagleton, London Review of Books "Never a scholar to be bound by conventions of periodization...Rawson has written a book of major importance for genres ranging from Renaissance encounter literature to modern Holocaust fiction. But his greatest gift has always been for torpedoing the prevailing assumptions of eighteenth-century studies, and in this bold new account of Swift, and the implications arising for other writers, he has done it, explosively, again."--The Times Literary Supplement "[Rawson's] important new book...might at first blush seem to have certain similarity to...fashionable criticisms of Western values and actions, but it could not be more different from them in its freedom from ideological agendas, its refusal to cook the evidence, its ability to see moral nuance, and its steady sense of the complexity of historical causation. Rawson has long been one of our most illuminating authorities on eighteenth-century English satire and on Swift in particular; but in his new book he casts a much wider net, exhibiting the same meticulous erudition in his treatment of Montaigne and Wilde and Shaw as he does in his discussion of the English Augustan writers."--The New Republic

- Publisher We are obsessed with "barbarians." They are the "not us," who don't speak our language, or "any language," whom we despise, fear, invade and kill; for whom we feel compassion, or admiration, and an intense sexual interest; whose innocence or vigor we aspire to, and who have an extraordinary^influence on the comportment, and even modes of dress, of our civilized metropolitan lives; whom we often outdo in the barbarism we impute to them; and whose suspected resemblance to us haunts our introspections and imaginings. This book looks afresh at how we have confronted the idea of^"barbarism," in ourselves and others, from the conquest of the Americas to the Nazi Holocaust, through the voices of many writers, including Montaigne, Swift and Shaw.

- Publisher

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About "God, Gulliver, and Genocide"

"Rawson's excellent book analyses 'the spectrum of aggressions' that exists between such figurative use of the language of extermination and its actual fulfillment in historical genocides over the last six centuries."--The Guardian" "[An] erudite, passionate book...learned, wide-ranging and acute.... [Rawson is] one of the finest 18th-century specialists, who...is also a critic of striking flair and delicacy."--Terry Eagleton, London Review of Books "Never a scholar to be bound by conventions of periodization...Rawson has written a book of major importance for genres ranging from Renaissance encounter literature to modern Holocaust fiction. But his greatest gift has always been for torpedoing the prevailing assumptions of eighteenth-century studies, and in this bold new account of Swift, and the implications arising for other writers, he has done it, explosively, again."--The Times Literary Supplement "[Rawson's] important new book...might at first blush seem to have certain similarity to...fashionable criticisms of Western values and actions, but it could not be more different from them in its freedom from ideological agendas, its refusal to cook the evidence, its ability to see moral nuance, and its steady sense of the complexity of historical causation. Rawson has long been one of our most illuminating authorities on eighteenth-century English satire and on Swift in particular; but in his new book he casts a much wider net, exhibiting the same meticulous erudition in his treatment of Montaigne and Wilde and Shaw as he does in his discussion of the English Augustan writers."--The New Republic
- Publisher

We are obsessed with "barbarians." They are the "not us," who don't speak our language, or "any language," whom we despise, fear, invade and kill; for whom we feel compassion, or admiration, and an intense sexual interest; whose innocence or vigor we aspire to, and who have an extraordinary^influence on the comportment, and even modes of dress, of our civilized metropolitan lives; whom we often outdo in the barbarism we impute to them; and whose suspected resemblance to us haunts our introspections and imaginings. This book looks afresh at how we have confronted the idea of^"barbarism," in ourselves and others, from the conquest of the Americas to the Nazi Holocaust, through the voices of many writers, including Montaigne, Swift and Shaw.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Claude Rawson

Claude Rawson is Maynard Mack Professor of English at Yale UClaude Rawson is Maynard Mack Professor of English at Yale University. niversity. C

Table Of Contents

  • :texts And Editions Usedacknowledgementsintroduction1: Indians And Irish2: The Savage With Hanging Breasts: Gulliver, Female Yahoos, And 'racism'3: Killing The Poor: An Anglo-irish Theme?4: God, Gulliver, And Genocideendnoteslist Of Works Citedindex

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 179724
  • Product Code 0198184255
  • EAN 9780198184256
  • Pages 440
  • Department Academic
  • Category History
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Oxford University Press
  • Publication Date Jun 2001
  • Dimensions 223 x 145 x 27 mm
  • Weight 0.630kg

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