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God's Passion For His Glory: Living the Vision of Jonathan Edwards

God's Passion For His Glory: Living the Vision of Jonathan Edwards

$19.99

Paperback
^In his essay The End for Which God Created the World, the great theologian Jonathan Edwards proclaimed that God's ultimate end is the manifestation of his glory in the highest happiness of his creatures. ^Pastor John Piper has devoted his years of ministry to exploring the implications of this stunning truth for life and ministry. Understanding that God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in him has made all the difference for John Piper-and can transform your life as well. ^Here Piper passionately demonstrates the relevance of Edwards's ideals for the personal and public lives of Christians today through his own book-length introduction to Edwards's The End for Which God Created the World. This book also contains the complete essay supplemented by almost a hundred of Piper's insightful explanatory notes. The result is a powerful and persuasive presentation of the things that matter most in the Christian life.

- Publisher Conception: Life begins!Life begins at conception as a single, separate, living cell. Nothing new is added except oxygen and nutrition. Fertilization occurs when a sperm and ovum join to form a single cell, full of life and bearing the unique genetic imprint of a person who has never existed before. The DNA in the 46 chromosomes of that small cell contain full instructions about that new individual's sex, eye color, foot size, brain capacity, and other physical traits. 1 week: ImplantationOn about the sixth day, the growing baby attaches to the wall of the mother's uterus. That rich nutrient lining welcomes the tiny tenant, and soon the child is sending out the chemical signal that can be detected in a home pregnancy test. Before the second week is over, the cells of the child's body will have already begun segregating themselves into the various layers that will give rise to the brain, nervous system, skin, digestive system, muscles, bones, and circulatory system 3-4 weeks: A beating heartThe baby's heart begins its first beats as early as 18 days after fertilization, often before the mother even suspects she is pregnant. Between the third and fourth weeks, the baby's head and spinal column become easily distinguishable, and arm buds appear. Legs will begin to appear days later. The umbilical cord forms, transporting oxygen and nutrients to the child. 6 weeks: Brain wavesFingers are forming, and the child's mouth and lips are apparent. The child begins his or her first movements. At six weeks, the baby has brain waves that can be measured with an electroencephalogram. 10-11 weeks: Organ systems in placeThe baby has eyelids, fingernails, and fingerprints, and can grasp an object. The kidneys begin to form urine.All body systems are in place and active: the baby has a skeletal structure, nerves, and circulation. 12 weeks: Movements and characteristicsThough too small to be felt by the mother, the baby reaches peak frequency of movement during the third month. The baby's sex can be visually determined, and the child's eyes, ears, and face begin to display distinctive characteristics. 14 weeks: A miracle of developmentEyebrows have formed, eye movements are seen. For a couple of weeks now, this baby has had all the body parts required to experience pain, including the nerves and spinal cord. 16 weeks: Making his or her presence knownThe baby becomes large and active enough for the mother to feel movement of turns, kicks, and somersaults that at some point even become visible to the outside. 20 weeks: Hearing mother's voiceIn the fifth and sixth months, the baby responds to music, sudden noises, and voices, especially that of his or her mother. Over the coming weeks, the baby will increase seven times in weight and nearly double in height. 23 weeks . . . or earlier: ViabilityViability is the time when the baby can survive outside the mother. Not long ago, viability was at 30 weeks, then 25. Today, babies at 22 or 23 weeks have been saved, and even some younger babies have survived. What will viability be tomorrow?* What you don't know can hurt youFew women faced with an unwanted pregnancy are told of the marvelous development of the life growing within them. In the absence of information, abortion seems to be the right decision at the moment. But they are not warned of what will really happen to their baby or of the possible physical and psychological effects of abortion that may stay with them the rest of their lives. And they are rarely told of the alternatives to save the life of their child.Some doctors say that abortion is a routine operation to remove "fetal tissue." But in truth, it is the destruction of a living human being. One young woman, who later regretted an abortion, stated, "The doctor said, 'A little fluid out and some fluid injected, severe cram

- Publisher

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About "God's Passion For His Glory: Living the Vision of Jonathan Edwards"

^In his essay The End for Which God Created the World, the great theologian Jonathan Edwards proclaimed that God's ultimate end is the manifestation of his glory in the highest happiness of his creatures. ^Pastor John Piper has devoted his years of ministry to exploring the implications of this stunning truth for life and ministry. Understanding that God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in him has made all the difference for John Piper-and can transform your life as well. ^Here Piper passionately demonstrates the relevance of Edwards's ideals for the personal and public lives of Christians today through his own book-length introduction to Edwards's The End for Which God Created the World. This book also contains the complete essay supplemented by almost a hundred of Piper's insightful explanatory notes. The result is a powerful and persuasive presentation of the things that matter most in the Christian life.
- Publisher

Conception: Life begins!Life begins at conception as a single, separate, living cell. Nothing new is added except oxygen and nutrition. Fertilization occurs when a sperm and ovum join to form a single cell, full of life and bearing the unique genetic imprint of a person who has never existed before. The DNA in the 46 chromosomes of that small cell contain full instructions about that new individual's sex, eye color, foot size, brain capacity, and other physical traits. 1 week: ImplantationOn about the sixth day, the growing baby attaches to the wall of the mother's uterus. That rich nutrient lining welcomes the tiny tenant, and soon the child is sending out the chemical signal that can be detected in a home pregnancy test. Before the second week is over, the cells of the child's body will have already begun segregating themselves into the various layers that will give rise to the brain, nervous system, skin, digestive system, muscles, bones, and circulatory system 3-4 weeks: A beating heartThe baby's heart begins its first beats as early as 18 days after fertilization, often before the mother even suspects she is pregnant. Between the third and fourth weeks, the baby's head and spinal column become easily distinguishable, and arm buds appear. Legs will begin to appear days later. The umbilical cord forms, transporting oxygen and nutrients to the child. 6 weeks: Brain wavesFingers are forming, and the child's mouth and lips are apparent. The child begins his or her first movements. At six weeks, the baby has brain waves that can be measured with an electroencephalogram. 10-11 weeks: Organ systems in placeThe baby has eyelids, fingernails, and fingerprints, and can grasp an object. The kidneys begin to form urine.All body systems are in place and active: the baby has a skeletal structure, nerves, and circulation. 12 weeks: Movements and characteristicsThough too small to be felt by the mother, the baby reaches peak frequency of movement during the third month. The baby's sex can be visually determined, and the child's eyes, ears, and face begin to display distinctive characteristics. 14 weeks: A miracle of developmentEyebrows have formed, eye movements are seen. For a couple of weeks now, this baby has had all the body parts required to experience pain, including the nerves and spinal cord. 16 weeks: Making his or her presence knownThe baby becomes large and active enough for the mother to feel movement of turns, kicks, and somersaults that at some point even become visible to the outside. 20 weeks: Hearing mother's voiceIn the fifth and sixth months, the baby responds to music, sudden noises, and voices, especially that of his or her mother. Over the coming weeks, the baby will increase seven times in weight and nearly double in height. 23 weeks . . . or earlier: ViabilityViability is the time when the baby can survive outside the mother. Not long ago, viability was at 30 weeks, then 25. Today, babies at 22 or 23 weeks have been saved, and even some younger babies have survived. What will viability be tomorrow?* What you don't know can hurt youFew women faced with an unwanted pregnancy are told of the marvelous development of the life growing within them. In the absence of information, abortion seems to be the right decision at the moment. But they are not warned of what will really happen to their baby or of the possible physical and psychological effects of abortion that may stay with them the rest of their lives. And they are rarely told of the alternatives to save the life of their child.Some doctors say that abortion is a routine operation to remove "fetal tissue." But in truth, it is the destruction of a living human being. One young woman, who later regretted an abortion, stated, "The doctor said, 'A little fluid out and some fluid injected, severe cram
- Publisher

Meet the Author

John Piper

John Stephen Piper was born 11 January 1946 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, to Bill and Ruth Piper. The Pipers soon moved to Greenville, South Carolina, where John spent his growing-up years. His father was an itinerant evangelist who also ministered through international radio and Bible courses. John has written a tribute to his mother, who died in 1974, in the booklet, What's the Difference (Crossway Books, 1990) which is also chapter one of the book, Recovering Biblical Manhood and Womanhood (Crossway Books, 1991).

At Wheaton College (1964-68), John majored in Literature and minored in Philosophy. Studying Romantic Literature with Clyde Kilby stimulated the poetic side of his nature and today he regularly writes poems to celebrate special family occasions and rich, biblical truths. At Wheaton John also met Noel Henry whom he married in 1968.

Following college, John completed a Bachelor of Divinity degree at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California (1968-71). While at Fuller, John discovered the writings of Jonathan Edwards.

John did his doctoral work in New Testament Studies at the University of Munich, Munich, West Germany (1971-74). His dissertation, Love Your Enemies, was published by Cambridge University Press and Baker Book House (and is now available through Crossway). Upon completion of his doctorate, he went on to teach Biblical Studies at Bethel College in St. Paul, Minnesota for six years (1974-80).

In 1980, sensing an irresistible call to preach, John became the senior pastor of Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he ministered for 33 years, until 2013. Together with his people, John was dedicated to spreading a passion for the supremacy of God in all things for the joy of all peoples through Jesus Christ - a mission he continues now for the wider church through the ministry of desiringGod.org. John says of his ministry:
"The ministry of preaching is the central labor of my life. My prayer is that through that ministry and everything else I do the great glory of our God and Savior Jesus Christ would be magnified as more and more people come to live out the obedience of faith more and more deeply."

John is the author of over 50 books and now frequently travels to speak, and writes regularly, through Desiring God.

John and Noel have four sons, a daughter, and twelve grandchildren.

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  • Catalogue Code 239051
  • Product Code 1581347456
  • EAN 9781581347456
  • Pages 272
  • Department Academic
  • Category Classic
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Crossway
  • Publication Date Jan 2006
  • Sales Rank #33186
  • Dimensions 228 x 152 x 17 mm
  • Weight 0.394kg

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