Back to Top
Our Stores Contact Us Help
Welcome, {{username}} Log Out Log In   /  Sign Up

How to Live a Life of Prayer: Classic Christian Writers on the Divine Privilege of Prayer

How to Live a Life of Prayer: Classic Christian Writers on the Divine Privilege of Prayer

$9.99

Paperback

You May Also Be Interested In

About "How to Live a Life of Prayer: Classic Christian Writers on the Divine Privilege of Prayer"

How to Live a Life of Prayer Sample
- Koorong

:

In this rich collection of encouraging writings, E. M. Bounds, S. D. Gordon, Andrew Murray, and John Wesley thoughtfully explore a variety of topics, including the purpose and power of prayer, hindrances to prayer, the "how to's" of praying, and Jesus' habits of prayer. Lightly updated for modern-day understanding, this accessible book offers spiritual insight and challenge that spans more than three centuries.


- Publisher

Meet the Authors

John Wesley

John Wesley, 1703 - 1791 English theologian John Wesley was born the 15th child, in the rectory at Epworth, Lincolnshire on June 17, 1703, to clergyman Samuel Wesley. He was also an evangelist and the founder of Methodism. He was educated at Charter House School and Christ Church, University of Oxford. He was ordained deacon in 1725 and admitted to the priesthood of the Church of England in 1728. In 1729, he went into residency at Oxford as a fellow of Lincoln College. While at Lincoln College, Wesley joined a group called the Holy Club, which included his brother Charles and George Whitefield, who later founded Calvinistic Methodism. It was a group of students that adhered strictly and methodically to religious precepts and practices by visiting prisons and comforting the sick, and their schoolmates called them "Methodists." In 1735, he went to Georgia as an Anglican missionary and met some German Moravians on the ship. He associated with them while in Savannah, Georgia and translated some of their hymns into English. While attending one of the Moravian's meetings on the return trip to England, he experienced a religious awakening. In 1739, Wesley joined George Whitefield in his evangelical endeavors. He preached an open-air sermon outside the church and received an enthusiastic reaction, which convinced him that this form of preaching was the most effective way to reach the masses. The Anglican Church frowned on revivalism. He attracted immense crowds because of his assurance that each person was accepted as a child of God, which was something the Anglican Church was unable to offer. On May 1, 1739, Wesley and a group of his followers formed the first Methodist society. Two similar societies were established in Bristol, and in late 1739, the London society began meeting in a building called the Foundry, which served as the headquarters of Methodism for many years. In 1740, Wesley parted with the Moravians and Whitefield because of doctrinal disagreements and the Calvinist doctrine of predestination. He also discarded many of the tenets of the Church of England, which made separation inevitable. In an effort for tighter organization of a growing Methodist movement, the societies were divided into classes, in 1742, with a leader for each class. Wesley called the first conference of the Methodist leaders in 1744 and the conferences were held annually thereafter. In 1751, he married Mary Vazeille who was a widow with four children. Their marriage eventually failed. In 1784, he issued the deed of declaration, which provided rules and regulations for the guidance of the Methodist societies, and appointed his aide Thomas Coke, an Anglican clergyman, superintendent of the Methodist organization in the United States. This empowered him to administer the sacraments with other ordinations following. The ordination was the largest step in breaking with the Anglican Church, but separation did not happen until after Wesley's death. Wesley compiled 23 collections of hymns, edited a monthly magazine, and translated Greek, Latin, and Hebrew works. He edited, under the title "The Christian Pattern," the medieval devotional work "De Imitatione Christi," generally ascribed to Thomas a` Kempis. In the latter part of Wesley's life, the hostility between the Anglican Church and Methodism had all but disappeared, and he was greatly admired. On March 2, 1791, Wesley died and was buried in the graveyard of City Road Chapel, London. In Westminster Abbey is a memorial plaque inscribed with his name.

E M Bounds

Edward McKendree Bounds (1835-1913), Methodist minister and devotional writer, was born in Shelby County, Missouri. He studied law and was admitted to the bar at 21 years of age. After practicing law for three years, he began preaching for the Methodist Episcopal Church. After the Civil War, Bounds served as pastor of churches in Tennessee and Alabama, and in St. Louis, Missouri. He spent the last 17 years of his life with his family in Washington, Georgia, writing his Spiritual Life Books. Some of these titles after a century are widely read like The Essentials of Prayer, A place called Heaven, Possibilities in Prayer, Praying with Purpose, and Power through Prayer, a number of these titles are also translated into Spanish.

Andrew Murray

South African pastor and author Andrew Murray, (1828-1917), one of four children was raised in the most remote corner of the world - Graaff-Reinet (near the Cape), South Africa, It was here, after his formal education in Scotland and three years of theological study,in Holland, that Andrew Murray returned as a missionary and minister. Murray's first appointment was to a remote and unattractive territory of nearly 50,000 square miles and 12,000 people.

In 1873, he helped to establish the Huguenot Seminary for girls. He also served as the first president of the Young Men's Christian Fellowship (YMCA).

Not only was Andrew Murray the author of over 240 books, he was also a man of great prayer. He began writing on the "deeper Christian life" - a favorite subject for Murray - for his congregation as an extension of his local pastoral work, but he became internationally known for his books, such as With Christ in the School of Prayerand Abide in Christ, that searched men's hearts and brought them into a deep relationship with Christ. Writing with an intensity of purpose and zeal for the message of the Gospel, Murray wrote numerous books even after his retirement at age seventy-eight. .- Publisher.

S D Gordon

S.D. GORDON was a widely traveled speaker in high demand in the early 1900s. His quiet manner, simplicity, illustrative quality and gentle spirit won him a great following wherever he went. A prolific author, he wrote more than 25 books, 22 of which belonged to the "Quiet Talks series." His first book sold half a million copies over a 40 year span!

Available Now.

10+ Available
Quantity

Add to Wishlist

WHY WAIT!

Expected to ship on Monday from Australia.

Delivery / Shipping Info

Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 502615
  • Product Code 9781683225638
  • ISBN 1683225635
  • EAN 9781683225638
  • Pages 192
  • Department General Books
  • Category Prayer
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Barbour & Co
  • Publication Date Apr 2018
  • Sales Rank #14892
  • Dimensions 171 x 106 mm

Bestsellers in Prayer