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Jesus and the Father

Jesus and the Father

$35.99

Paperback

This book is about the contemporary debate among evangelicals on the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity and the controversial issues surrounding the relationship between the divine Father and Son. It particularly challenges eternal economic subordination of Son to the Father - a view espoused by many evangelicals - and explains what the historic distinctions between economic Trinity and immanent Trinity really imply. 320 pages, from Zondervan.
- Publisher.

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About "Jesus and the Father"

This book is about the contemporary debate among evangelicals on the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity and the controversial issues surrounding the relationship between the divine Father and Son. It particularly challenges eternal economic subordination of Son to the Father - a view espoused by many evangelicals - and explains what the historic distinctions between economic Trinity and immanent Trinity really imply. 320 pages, from Zondervan.
- Publisher.
- Koorong

The doctrine of the Trinity is one of the cornerstones of Christianity. In Jesus and the Father, Kevin Giles wrestles with questions about the Trinity that are dividing the evangelical community: What is the error called "subordinationism"? Is the Son eternally subordinated to the Father in function? Are the Father and the Son divided or undivided in power and authority? Is the Father-Son-Spirit relationship ordered hierarchical or horizontal? How should the Father and the Son be differentiated to avoid the errors of modalism and subordinationism? What is the relationship between the so-called economic Trinity and the immanent Trinity? Does the Father-Son relationship in the Trinity prescribe male-female relationships in the home and the church? "Kevin Giles points out serious problems in the teaching that the Son is eternally subordinated to the Father and argues effectively for the full eternal equality within the Trinity. This book should be read by all who wrestle with the complex
- Publisher

1. An Introduction To The Contemporary Debate On The Trinity 2. What The Bible Says About The Trinity And What It Does Not Say 3. The Rejection Of The Subordinationism In The Historic Tradition 4. The Rejection Of The Eternal Obedience Of The Son In Tradition 5. How Are The Divine Persons Differentiated 6. Should The Subordination Seen In The Incarnation Be Read Back Into The Eternal Or Immanent Trinity Conclusion: Where Do We Go From Here Appendix: Is God Male
- Publisher

Jesus and the Father Copyright 2006 by Kevin Giles Requests for information should be addressed to: Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49530 Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Giles, Kevin. Jesus and the father : modern evangelicals reinvent the doctrine of the Trinity / Kevin Giles - 1st ed. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN-10: 0-310-2664-5 ISBN-13: 978-0-310-26664-8 1. Trinity - History of doctrines. 2. Evangelicalism. I. Title. BT111.3.G45 2006 231'.044 - dc22 2005034545 CIP The Scripture quotations contained herein are from the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright 1989 by the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the United States of America, and are used by permission. All rights reserved. Scripture verses marked KJV are from the King James Version of the Bible. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means - electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or any other - except for brief quotations in printed reviews, without the prior permission of the publisher. The website addresses recommended throughout this book are offered as a resource to you. These websites are not intended in any way to be or imply an endorsement on the part of Zondervan, nor do we vouch for their content for the life of this book. Interior design by Nancy Wilson Printed in the United States of America 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 - 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 We want to hear from you. Please send your comments about this book to us in care of zreview@zondervan.com. Thank you. 17 Chapter 1 Contemporary Evangelicals and the Doctrine of the Trinity In the past thirty years there has been an amazing resurgence of interest in the doctrine of the Trinity. Roman Catholics, mainline Protestants, and Eastern Orthodox theologians have published numerous studies and books on the Trinity, and they are continuing to appear. Evangelicals at first were not involved, but a change is under way, as this book and others written recently by evangelicals indicate.1 After a long period of neglect, this doctrine is now on center stage as it should be, because it is nothing less than our distinctive Christian doctrine of God. Most contemporary books on the Trinity have two foci. They look back to the historical sources to see how the doctrine was developed by the best of theologians across the centuries, and they look at the present to see how this fundamental doctrine can be best expressed building on all the work and thought that has gone before. Irenaeus, Tertullian, Athanasius, the Cappadocian Fathers, Augustine, Aquinas, and Calvin are the most commonly studied historical authorities. One of the most important developments in this doctrinal renaissance has been the recognition that there is much to learn from the early Greek-speaking theologians, particularly Athanasius 1 For example, Millard Erickson, God in Three Persons: A Contemporary Interpretation of the Trinity (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker, 1995); Roger E. Olson and Christopher A. Hall, The Trinity (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 2002); Stanley J. Grenz, Rediscovering the Triune God: The Trinity in Contemporary Theology (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2004); Brian Edgar, The Message of the Trinity (Leicester, England: Inter-Varsity, 2004); Robert Letham, The Holy Trinity in Scripture, History, Theology, and Worship (Phillipsburg, N.J.: P&R, 2004). and the Cappadocian Fathers, who for centuries were somewhat forgotten by Roman Catholic and Protestant theologians. Right at the heart of their doctrine of the Trinity was the belief that God's triunity was to be under
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Kevin Giles

Kevin Giles (Th.D., Australian College of Theology) is vicar of St. Michael's Church (Anglican) in North Carlton, Australia. He has also served as a minister and consulting theologian for World Vision Australia. Giles has contributed numerous articles to scholarly journals, and to IVP's Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels and Dictionary of the Later New Testament and Its Development. He has written several books, including What on Earth Is the Church? (IVP), The Trinity and Subordinationism and Patterns of Ministry Among the First Christians (HarperCollins).

Excerpt

Excerpt from: Jesus and the Father

Jesus and the Father 17 Chapter 1 Contemporary Evangelicals and the Doctrine of the Trinity In the past thirty years there has been an amazing resurgence of interest in the doctrine of the Trinity. Roman Catholics, mainline Protestants, and Eastern Orthodox theologians have published numerous studies and books on the Trinity, and they are continuing to appear. Evangelicals at first were not involved, but a change is under way, as this book and others written recently by evangelicals indicate.1 After a long period of neglect, this doctrine is now on center stage as it should be, because it is nothing less than our distinctive Christian doctrine of God. Most contemporary books on the Trinity have two foci. They look back to the historical sources to see how the doctrine was developed by the best of theologians across the centuries, and they look at the present to see how this fundamental doctrine can be best expressed building on all the work and thought that has gone before. Irenaeus, Tertullian, Athanasius, the Cappadocian Fathers, Augustine, Aquinas, and Calvin are the most commonly studied historical authorities. One of the most important developments in this doctrinal renaissance has been the recognition that there is much to learn from the early Greek-speaking theologians, particularly Athanasius 1 For example, Millard Erickson, God in Three Persons: A Contemporary Interpretation of the Trinity (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker, 1995); Roger E. Olson and Christopher A. Hall, The Trinity (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 2002); Stanley J. Grenz, Rediscovering the Triune God: The Trinity in Contemporary Theology (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2004); Brian Edgar, The Message of the Trinity (Leicester, England: Inter-Varsity, 2004); Robert Letham, The Holy Trinity in Scripture, History, Theology, and Worship (Phillipsburg, N.J.: PandR, 2004). and the Cappadocian Fathers, who for centuries were somewhat forgotten by Roman Catholic and Protestant theologians. Right at the heart of their doctrine of the Trinity was the belief that God's triunity was to be understood communally. The three persons are the one God in the most intimate, self-giving fellowship. This development has lead to a widespread move away from Tertullian, Augustine, and Aquinas's practice of speaking of God in unity as 'one substance,' an expression which sounds impersonal and abstract, even if this was not intended. In this prevailing 'communal model' of the Trinity, the coequality of the divine three both in unity and in relation to one another as persons is very much to the fore. Given this starting point for the doctrine of the Trinity, any suggestion that the divine three are ordered hierarchically, or divided in being, work, or authority, is unthinkable. Ted Peters in his 1993 book God as Trinity: Relationality and Temporality in Divine Life2 describes contemporary thinking about the Christian God as 'antisubordinationist trinitarianism.' Similarly, the conservative evangelical Millard Erickson in his 1995 study, God in Three Persons, says that along with other contemporary theologians he believes in 'the complete equality of the divine three.'3 David Cunningham in his 1998 book, These Three Are One: The Practice of Trinitarian Theology, is of much the same opinion. He speaks of 'a radical, relational, co-equality' in modern trinitarian thinking.4 In my opinion the finest study on the Trinity in the last ten years is that by Thomas F. Torrance, The Christian Doctrine of God: One Being Three Persons.5 He too emphasizes the coequality of the differentiated divine persons. Building on the work of Athanasius and the Cappadocians, he makes the Trinity itself the monarche (sole source or origin) of the divine three and the Son the monarche of divine saving revelation. He is totally opposed to subordinationism in any form. In the light of this contemporary stress on the coequality of the divine persons who are understood to be bound together in the most intimate bond of love and self-giving, it is of no surprise that some of the best contemporary expositions of the doctrine of the Trinity see the Trinity as a charter for human liberation and emancipation. 6 If no one divine person is before or after, greater or lesser because they are 'coequal' (as the Athanasian creed says), this suggests, we are told, that all hierarchi- 18 JES US AND THE FATHER 2 Ted Peters, God as Trinity: Relationality and Temporality in Divine Life (Louisville: Westminster, 1993). 3 Erickson, God in Three Persons, 331. 4 David Cunningham, These Three Are One: The Practice of Trinitarian Theology (Oxford: Blackwell, 1998), 113. 5 Thomas F. Torrance, The Christian Doctrine of God: One Being Three Persons. (Edinburgh: TandT Clark, 1996). 6 Leonardo Boff, Trinity and Society (New York: Orbis, 1988); Jurgen Moltmann, The Trinity and the Kingdom (New York: Harper and Row, 1981); Catherine LaCugna, God for Us (San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 1991); Erickson, God in Three Persons. cal ordering in this world is a human construct ref lecting fallen existence, not God's ideal. God would like to see every human being valued in the same way. It is thus the Christian's duty to oppose human philosophies and structures that oppress people, limiting their full potential as human beings made in the image and likeness of God. Millard Erickson is one evangelical who is sympathetic to this agenda predicated on the belief that the persons of the Trinity relate as equals in self-giving love.7 Paradoxically, in this same thirty-year period many conservative evangelicals concerned to maintain the permanent subordination of women have been developing a doctrine of a hierarchically ordered Trinity in which the Father rules over the Son just like men are to rule over women in the church and the home. We are told that the Father is eternally 'head over' the Son just as men are permanently 'head over' women in the church and the home. On this model of the Trinity, the doctrine of the Trinity indicates that God has appointed some to rule and some to obey, and this is the ideal. It is not unfair to say that rather than being a charter for emancipation and human liberation, this doctrine of the Trinity suggests that social change and female liberation should be opposed. The conservative evangelical theologians who think of the Trinity as hierarchically ordered with the Father commanding and the Son obeying insist that what they are teaching is what the Bible teaches and historic orthodoxy endorses. I am an evangelical, but I am convinced the opposite is the truth. The Bible and the interpretative tradition summed up in the creeds and Reformation confessions speak of a coequal Trinity where there is no hierarchical ordering.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 235746
  • Product Code 0310266645
  • EAN 9780310266648
  • UPC 025986266646
  • Pages 320
  • Department Academic
  • Category Theology
  • Sub-Category God & Trinity
  • Publisher Zondervan
  • Publication Date May 2006
  • Sales Rank #17495
  • Dimensions 228 x 152 x 25 mm
  • Weight 0.394kg

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