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Keys to the Deeper Life (/expanded)

Keys to the Deeper Life (/expanded)

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Although never considered to be a popular speaker nor prolific writer, A. W. Tozer's audiences did appreciate what he had to say, and he was probably the most widely read Christian writer of his time. Keys to the Deeper Life contains six of his best-known essays and editorials. In them he rigorously examines many of the failings and foibles of his day. Although most were written more than three decades ago, the insights they offer are as fresh and thought-provoking as the day they were published. Robert Walker, the editor of Christian Life, and a long-time associate of Tozer, has written an Introduction to the book that delightfully captures Tozer's irascible genius. Keys to the Deeper Life also contains the account of an exclusive interview with A. W. Tozer shortly before his death.

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About "Keys to the Deeper Life (/expanded)"

Although never considered to be a popular speaker nor prolific writer, A. W. Tozer's audiences did appreciate what he had to say, and he was probably the most widely read Christian writer of his time. Keys to the Deeper Life contains six of his best-known essays and editorials. In them he rigorously examines many of the failings and foibles of his day. Although most were written more than three decades ago, the insights they offer are as fresh and thought-provoking as the day they were published. Robert Walker, the editor of Christian Life, and a long-time associate of Tozer, has written an Introduction to the book that delightfully captures Tozer's irascible genius. Keys to the Deeper Life also contains the account of an exclusive interview with A. W. Tozer shortly before his death.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

A W Tozer

A. W. Tozer died in 1963, but his life and spiritual legacy continue to draw many into a deeper knowledge of God. During his lifetime, Tozer pastored several Christian and Missionary Alliance churches. Missions and the deeper life in Christ were his primary focus. He also served as editor of the Alliance Life. Tozer authored more than 40 books, (at least two of which are considered classics: The Pursuit of God and Knowledge of the Holy), a tremendous accomplishment for a man who never received a formal theological education. The presence of God was his classroom, his notebooks and tools consisted of prayer, God's Word, and the writings of early Christians and theologians, the Puritans, and great men of faith. - Publisher.

Table Of Contents

  • Contents
  • Introduction
  • Preface
  • 1. Leaning Into The Wind
  • 2. Panting After God
  • 3. Showered With His Gifts
  • 4. Brimming Over With The Spirit
  • 5. Touching Heaven In Prayer
  • 6. Favorite Themes From Tozer
  • Addendum: Exclusive Interview With A. W. Tozer

Excerpt

Excerpt from: Keys to the Deeper Life (/expanded)

CHAPTER ONE Leaning into the Wind Wherever Christians meet these days one word is sure to be heard constantly repeated; that word is revival. In sermon, song and prayer we are forever reminding the Lord and each other that what we must have to solve all our spiritual problems is a 'mighty, old-time revival.' The religious press, too, has largely gone over to the proposition that revival is the one great need of the hour, and anyone who is capable of preparing a brief for revival is sure to find many editors who will publish it. So strongly is the breeze blowing for revival that scarcely anyone appears to have the discernment or the courage to turn around and lean into the wind, even though the truth may easily lie in that direction. Religion has its vogues very much as do philosophy, politics and women's fashions. Historically the major world religions have had their periods of decline and recovery, and those recoveries are bluntly called revivals by the annalists. Let us not forget that in some lands Islam is now enjoying a revival, and the latest report from Japan indicates that after a brief eclipse following World War II Shintoism is making a remarkable come-back. In our own country Roman Catholicism as well as liberal Protestantism is moving forward at such a rate that the word 'revival' is almost necessary to describe the phenomenon. And this without any perceptible elevation of the moral standards of its devotees. A religion, even popular Christianity, could enjoy a boom altogether divorced from the transforming power of the Holy Spirit and so leave the church of the next generation worse off than it would have been if the boom had never occurred. I believe that the imperative need of the day is not simply revival, but a radical reformation that will go to the root of our moral and spiritual maladies and deal with causes rather than with consequences, with the disease rather than with symptoms. It is my considered opinion that under the present circumstances we do not want revival at all. A widespread revival of the kind of Christianity we know today in America might prove to be a moral tragedy from which we would not recover in a hundred years. Here are my reasons. A generation ago, as a reaction from Higher Criticism and its offspring, Modernism, there arose in Protestantism a powerful movement in defense of the historic Christian faith. This, for obvious reasons, came to be known as Fundamentalism. It was a more or less spontaneous movement without much organization, but its purpose wherever it appeared was the same: to stay 'the rising tide of negation' in Christian theology and to restate and defend the basic doctrines of New Testament Christianity. This much is history. Falls Victim to Its Virtues What is generally overlooked is that Fundamentalism, as it spread throughout the various denominations and nondenominational groups, fell victim to its own virtues. The Word died in the hands of its friends. Verbal inspiration, for instance (a doctrine which I have always held and do now hold), soon became afflicted with rigor mortis. The voice of the prophet was silenced and the scribe captured the minds of the faithful. In large areas the religious imagination withered. An unofficial hierarchy decided what Christians were to believe. Not the Scriptures, but what the scribe thought the Scriptures meant became the Christian creed. Christian colleges, seminaries, Bible institutes, Bible conferences, popular Bible expositors all joined to promote the cult of textualism. The system of extreme dispensationalism which was devised, relieved the Christian of repentance, obedience and cross-carrying in any other than the most formal sense. Whole sections of the New Testament were taken from the church and disposed of after a rigid system of 'dividing the Word of truth.' All this resulted in a religious mentality inimical to the true faith of Christ. A kind of cold mist settled over Fundamentalism. Below, the terrain was familiar. This was New Testament Christianity, to be sure. The basic doctrines of the Bible were there, but the climate was just not favorable to the sweet fruits of the Spirit. The whole mood was different from that of the Early Church and of the great souls who suffered and sang and worshiped in the centuries past. The doctrines were sound but something vital was missing. The tree of correct doctrine was never allowed to blossom. The voice of the turtle [dove] was rarely heard in the land; instead, the parrot sat on his artificial perch and dutifully repeated what he had been taught and the whole emotional tone was somber and dull. Faith, a mighty, vitalizing doctrine in the mouths of the apostles, became in the mouth of the scribe another thing altogether and power went from it. As the letter triumphed, the Spirit withdrew and textualism ruled supreme. It was the time of the believer's Babylonian captivity. In the interest of accuracy it should be said that this was a general condition only. Certainly there were some even in those low times whose longing hearts were better theologians than their teachers were. These pressed on to a fullness and power unknown to the rest. But they were not many and the odds were too great; they could not dispel the mist that hung over the land. The error of textualism is not doctrinal. It is far more subtle than that and much more difficult to discover, but its effects are just as deadly. Not its theological beliefs are at fault, but its assumptions. It assumes, for instance, that if we have the word for a thing we have the thing itself. If it is in the Bible, it is in us. If we have the doctrine, we have the experience. If something was true of Paul it is of necessity true of us because we accept Paul's epistles as divinely inspired. The Bible tells us how to be saved, but textualism goes on to make it tell us that we are saved, something which in the very nature of things it cannot do. Assurance of individual salvation is thus no more than a logical conclusion drawn from doctrinal premises, and the resultant experience wholly mental.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 23883
  • Product Code 031033361X
  • EAN 9780310333616
  • UPC 025986333614
  • Pages 96
  • Department Academic
  • Category Classic
  • Sub-Category A W Tozer
  • Publisher Zondervan
  • Publication Date Sep 1988
  • Sales Rank #22685
  • Dimensions 203 x 133 x 6 mm
  • Weight 0.104kg

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