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Let God's Light Shine Forth

Robert Moynihan (Ed)Benedict Xvi Pope

Let God's Light Shine Forth

Robert Moynihan (Ed)Benedict Xvi Pope

$26.99

Hardback
Though he was a familiar Church leader for many years before becoming pope, there has been little awareness of the spiritual side of Benedict XVI. Now for the first time readers are given a brilliant overview of the Pope's most inspirational teachings in "Let God's Light Shine Forth," Editor Robert Moynihan offers a brief introduction to the life and work of Pope Benedict XVI and then presents an absorbing collection of his most persuasive words. ^Within these pages, Pope Benedict XVI introduces a God who is good, beautiful, and true, the fountain of all life. The most important thing for each person, in Benedict's view, is to discover and develop a loving relationship with God, because this is the way to the deepest and most lasting happiness that human beings can experience. Even in our darkest moments, he teaches, we can have hope that all things will ultimately work out in a wonderful way to show God's glory and bring blessedness to individual men and women. ^Many of these s

- Publisher Part One THE MAN AND HIS LIFE Robert Moynihan "We are supposed to be the light of the world, and that means that we should allow the Lord to be seen through us. We do not wish to be seen ourselves, but wish for the Lord to be seen through us. It seems to me that this is the real meaning of the Gospel when it says 'act in such a way that people who see you may see the work of God and praise God.' Not that people may see the Christians but 'by means of you, God.'Therefore, the person must not appear, but allow God to be seen through his person." Pope Benedict XVI, conversation with Robert Moynihan, February 23, 1993 "The Presence of God" On April 19, 2005, in Rome, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, at age 78, was chosen by the cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church to be the 265th successor of the apostle Peter, bishop of Rome and head of the universal Church. The world was genuinely astonished. Why? In large measure, because they were surprised that a group of cardinals representing places like Argentina, Nigeria, and India had not chosen a younger, more "progressive" cardinal from the Third World to "reform" and "modernize" traditional Christian doctrines and emphasize issues of social justice. Instead, they had chosen an elderly German cardinal, Joseph Ratzinger, who, over the previous quarter century as head of the Vatican's chief doctrinal ofFice (the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith), had earned a reputation for defending the traditional teachings of the Church and for emphasizing the priority of the "right worship" of God in any effort to build a just human society. How did this happen? Why did it happen? What does it mean? Over the past 30 years, not only the cardinals who elected Ratzinger as Pope, but many Catholics, and other men and women of good will around the world, have come to agree with Benedict that the greatest "crisis" facing the Church and the world is "the absence of God"a culture and way of life without any transcendent dimension, without any orientation toward eternity, toward the sacred, toward the divine. And that the "solution" to this "crisis" is quite simple to express in a phrase: the world needs "the presence of God." Benedict had long argued that the "absence of God" in the modern world, the "secularization" of modern "globalized" society, has created a society in which the human person no longer has any sure protection against the depredations of power or, more importantly, any clear understanding of the meaning and ultimate destination of his life. Yet his call to reorient human culture toward God has never meant an abandonment of the search for social justice. Rather, it has always been a challenge to place that search within the Christian context of repentance and belief in the Gospel. Benedict's focus on the "priority" of knowing and loving God before doing anything else whatsoever was seen by the vast majority of the college of cardinals as the right focus. Benedict was elected by his fellow cardinals, including many from very poor countries, because they agreed with him about the need for a Pope who could preach the priority of God, and in so doing, lay the only secure foundation for a just society. In understanding the vision of Benedict XVI, we begin not by examining his many theological works formulated over the past 50 years, but by listening as he himself describes his own beginning. His words, based on several interviews from 1993 to 1995 and also on his autob

- Publisher

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About "Let God's Light Shine Forth"

Though he was a familiar Church leader for many years before becoming pope, there has been little awareness of the spiritual side of Benedict XVI. Now for the first time readers are given a brilliant overview of the Pope's most inspirational teachings in "Let God's Light Shine Forth," Editor Robert Moynihan offers a brief introduction to the life and work of Pope Benedict XVI and then presents an absorbing collection of his most persuasive words. ^Within these pages, Pope Benedict XVI introduces a God who is good, beautiful, and true, the fountain of all life. The most important thing for each person, in Benedict's view, is to discover and develop a loving relationship with God, because this is the way to the deepest and most lasting happiness that human beings can experience. Even in our darkest moments, he teaches, we can have hope that all things will ultimately work out in a wonderful way to show God's glory and bring blessedness to individual men and women. ^Many of these s
- Publisher

Part One THE MAN AND HIS LIFE Robert Moynihan "We are supposed to be the light of the world, and that means that we should allow the Lord to be seen through us. We do not wish to be seen ourselves, but wish for the Lord to be seen through us. It seems to me that this is the real meaning of the Gospel when it says 'act in such a way that people who see you may see the work of God and praise God.' Not that people may see the Christians but 'by means of you, God.'Therefore, the person must not appear, but allow God to be seen through his person." Pope Benedict XVI, conversation with Robert Moynihan, February 23, 1993 "The Presence of God" On April 19, 2005, in Rome, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, at age 78, was chosen by the cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church to be the 265th successor of the apostle Peter, bishop of Rome and head of the universal Church. The world was genuinely astonished. Why? In large measure, because they were surprised that a group of cardinals representing places like Argentina, Nigeria, and India had not chosen a younger, more "progressive" cardinal from the Third World to "reform" and "modernize" traditional Christian doctrines and emphasize issues of social justice. Instead, they had chosen an elderly German cardinal, Joseph Ratzinger, who, over the previous quarter century as head of the Vatican's chief doctrinal ofFice (the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith), had earned a reputation for defending the traditional teachings of the Church and for emphasizing the priority of the "right worship" of God in any effort to build a just human society. How did this happen? Why did it happen? What does it mean? Over the past 30 years, not only the cardinals who elected Ratzinger as Pope, but many Catholics, and other men and women of good will around the world, have come to agree with Benedict that the greatest "crisis" facing the Church and the world is "the absence of God"a culture and way of life without any transcendent dimension, without any orientation toward eternity, toward the sacred, toward the divine. And that the "solution" to this "crisis" is quite simple to express in a phrase: the world needs "the presence of God." Benedict had long argued that the "absence of God" in the modern world, the "secularization" of modern "globalized" society, has created a society in which the human person no longer has any sure protection against the depredations of power or, more importantly, any clear understanding of the meaning and ultimate destination of his life. Yet his call to reorient human culture toward God has never meant an abandonment of the search for social justice. Rather, it has always been a challenge to place that search within the Christian context of repentance and belief in the Gospel. Benedict's focus on the "priority" of knowing and loving God before doing anything else whatsoever was seen by the vast majority of the college of cardinals as the right focus. Benedict was elected by his fellow cardinals, including many from very poor countries, because they agreed with him about the need for a Pope who could preach the priority of God, and in so doing, lay the only secure foundation for a just society. In understanding the vision of Benedict XVI, we begin not by examining his many theological works formulated over the past 50 years, but by listening as he himself describes his own beginning. His words, based on several interviews from 1993 to 1995 and also on his autob
- Publisher

Meet the Authors

Robert Moynihan (Ed)

DR. ROBERT MOYNIHAN is founder and editor of "Inside the Vatican" magazine, a monthly journal on Church and world affairs from Rome. He is regarded as one of the world's leading Vatican analysts and has interviewed Pope Benedict XVI more than twenty times. He received his Ph.D. in medieval studies from Yale University and divides his time between Rome and Annapolis, Maryland. He is married and has two sons, Christopher, fifteen, and Luke, twelve, who are both excellent soccer players. ýCHRISTINA BADDE, who assisted on the book, is a German journalist in Rome who speaks three languages and c

Benedict Xvi Pope

On April 19, 2005, CARDINAL JOSEPH RATZINGER was elected POPE BENEDICT XVI and became the 264th successor to Peter as the "Vicar of Jesus Christ." He may well be the most accomplished theologian to be elected Pope in modern times. Beginning in 1981 he spent over 20 years as the Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, a role often depicted as the "defender of the faith." Cardinal Ratzinger was also President of the Pontifical Biblical Commission and of the Preparatory Commission that codified the new "Catechism of the Catholic Church," published in 1994.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 237330
  • Product Code 0385507925
  • EAN 9780385507929
  • Pages 224
  • Department Academic
  • Category Theology
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Doubleday
  • Publication Date Jun 2005
  • Dimensions 196 x 133 x 18 mm
  • Weight 0.308kg

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