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Mismeasure of Woman

Carol Tavris

Mismeasure of Woman

Carol Tavris

$65.00

Paperback
When "man is the measure of all things," woman is forever trying to measure up. In this enlightening book, Carol Tavris unmasks the widespread but invisible custom -- pervasive in the social sciences, medicine, law, and history -- of treating men as the normal standard, women as abnormal. Tavris expands our vision of normalcy by illuminating the similarities between women and men and showing that the real differences lie not in gender, but in power, resources, and life experiences. ^ Winner of the American Association for Applied and Preventive Psychology's Distinguished Media Contribution Award

- Publisher Introduction The Universal Male Man is the measure of all things. Protagoras (c. 485-410 B.C.) Join me, if you will, in a brief flight of fancy. George Jones, age thirty-four, visits the "psychology and health" section of his local bookstore. There he finds an assortment of books designed to solve his problems with love, sex, work, stress, and children: * Women Who Hate Men and the Men. Who Love Themexplains why he remains in a self-defeating relationship with Jane. * The X Spot and other new findings about male sexualitytells him exactly how to have the right kind of multiple orgasm that women have. * The Male Managershows why his typically male habits of competitiveness and individualism prevent him from advancing in the female-dominated, cooperative corporate world. * Cooperation Trainingoffers practical instructions for overcoming his early competitive socialization as a man, showing him how to get along more smoothly with others. * The Superman Syndromeexplains that because men are physically less hardy than women throughout their lives, men find it difficult to combine work and family. They would live as long as women do if they would scale down their efforts to seek power and success. * The Father KnotandThe Reproduction of Fatheringexplore the reasons that George feels so guilty about the way he is raising his children. Women feel comfortable with motherhood, these books argue, because they bear and nurse their offspring. But men for basic anatomical reasons are doomed to feel insecure and guilty in their role as fathers because unconsciously they never quite believe the child is theirs. * Erratic Testosterone Syndrome (ETS) -- What it is and how to live with itprovides medical and psychological information to help George cope with his hormonal ups and downs. Because men do not have a visible monthly reminder of hormonal changes, they fail to realize that their moodiness and aggressive outbursts are hormonally based. A special concluding chapter helps the wives of men with ETS learn to live with their husbands' unpredictable mood swings. Lucky George. He will never feel obliged to read books like these, were anyone ever to write them; but of course women feel obliged to read the comparable volumes directed to them. It's a puzzle that they do, actually, because most of these books imply that women aren't doing anything right. Women are irrational and moody because of their hormones. They cry too much. They love too much. They talk too much. They think differently. They are too dependent on unworthy men, but if they leave the men to fend for themselves, they are too independent, and if they stay with the men they are codependent. They are too emotional, except when the emotion in question is anger, in which case they aren't emotional enough. They don't have correct orgasms, the correct way, with the correct frequency. They pay too much attention to their children, or not enough, or the wrong kind. They are forever subject to syndromes: the Superwoman Syndrome causes the Stress Syndrome, which is exacerbated by Premenstrual Syndrome, which is followed by a Menopausal Deficiency Syndrome. Why do women buy so many self-help books every year to improve their sex lives, moods, relationships, and mental health? Simone de Beauvoir gave us one answer in 1949: because women are the second sex, the other sex, the sex to be explained. Men and women are not simply considered different from one another, as we speak of people differing in eye color, movie tastes, or preferences for ice cream. In almost every domain of life, men are considered the normal human being, and women are "ab-normal," deficient because they are different from men. Therefore, women constantly worry about measuring up, doing the right thing, being the right way. It is normal for women to worry about being abnormal,

- Publisher Contents Introduction: The Universal Male 1 Measuring Up Why women are not inferior to men * Body: Beauty and the bust * Psyche: The problem of women * Brain: Dissecting the differences 2 Beautiful Souls and Different Voices Why women are not superior to men * Fighters and pacifists * The search for the feminist Eden * Moral voices, moral choices * Why opposites repel 3 The 70-Kilogram Man and the Pregnant Person Why women are not the same as men * The 70-kilogram man * Can women be "different" and "equal"? * The pregnant person: Woman as flowerpot * Women's rights versus equal rights 4 Misdiagnosing the Body Premenstrual syndrome, postmenstrual syndrome, and other normal "diseases" * The manufacture of "PMS" * Of menstruation and men: The story behind the headlines * Reading the body: The psychology of symptoms * Doctoring the failed female 5 Misdiagnosing the Mind Why women are "sick" but men have "problems" * How to create a mental illness: Are you a self-defeating personality? * How to create a social disease:Are you codependent? * Diagnosing the human condition 6 Bedtime Stories Three fables of female sexuality * The myth of the coy female * The myth of the lusty female * The parable of the G Spot * Beyond sexual "natures" 7 Love's Experts, Love's Victims How women cornered the love market * The feminizing of love * Economics and emotions * The sounds of silence * Love story 8 Speaking of Gender The darkened eye restored * The prover of context...and the context of power * The power of story: Gender as narrative * Choosing a story: Victims, survivors, and the problem of blame * Bridges Notes Bibliography Acknowledgments Index

- Publisher

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About "Mismeasure of Woman"

When "man is the measure of all things," woman is forever trying to measure up. In this enlightening book, Carol Tavris unmasks the widespread but invisible custom -- pervasive in the social sciences, medicine, law, and history -- of treating men as the normal standard, women as abnormal. Tavris expands our vision of normalcy by illuminating the similarities between women and men and showing that the real differences lie not in gender, but in power, resources, and life experiences. ^ Winner of the American Association for Applied and Preventive Psychology's Distinguished Media Contribution Award
- Publisher

Introduction The Universal Male Man is the measure of all things. Protagoras (c. 485-410 B.C.) Join me, if you will, in a brief flight of fancy. George Jones, age thirty-four, visits the "psychology and health" section of his local bookstore. There he finds an assortment of books designed to solve his problems with love, sex, work, stress, and children: * Women Who Hate Men and the Men. Who Love Themexplains why he remains in a self-defeating relationship with Jane. * The X Spot and other new findings about male sexualitytells him exactly how to have the right kind of multiple orgasm that women have. * The Male Managershows why his typically male habits of competitiveness and individualism prevent him from advancing in the female-dominated, cooperative corporate world. * Cooperation Trainingoffers practical instructions for overcoming his early competitive socialization as a man, showing him how to get along more smoothly with others. * The Superman Syndromeexplains that because men are physically less hardy than women throughout their lives, men find it difficult to combine work and family. They would live as long as women do if they would scale down their efforts to seek power and success. * The Father KnotandThe Reproduction of Fatheringexplore the reasons that George feels so guilty about the way he is raising his children. Women feel comfortable with motherhood, these books argue, because they bear and nurse their offspring. But men for basic anatomical reasons are doomed to feel insecure and guilty in their role as fathers because unconsciously they never quite believe the child is theirs. * Erratic Testosterone Syndrome (ETS) -- What it is and how to live with itprovides medical and psychological information to help George cope with his hormonal ups and downs. Because men do not have a visible monthly reminder of hormonal changes, they fail to realize that their moodiness and aggressive outbursts are hormonally based. A special concluding chapter helps the wives of men with ETS learn to live with their husbands' unpredictable mood swings. Lucky George. He will never feel obliged to read books like these, were anyone ever to write them; but of course women feel obliged to read the comparable volumes directed to them. It's a puzzle that they do, actually, because most of these books imply that women aren't doing anything right. Women are irrational and moody because of their hormones. They cry too much. They love too much. They talk too much. They think differently. They are too dependent on unworthy men, but if they leave the men to fend for themselves, they are too independent, and if they stay with the men they are codependent. They are too emotional, except when the emotion in question is anger, in which case they aren't emotional enough. They don't have correct orgasms, the correct way, with the correct frequency. They pay too much attention to their children, or not enough, or the wrong kind. They are forever subject to syndromes: the Superwoman Syndrome causes the Stress Syndrome, which is exacerbated by Premenstrual Syndrome, which is followed by a Menopausal Deficiency Syndrome. Why do women buy so many self-help books every year to improve their sex lives, moods, relationships, and mental health? Simone de Beauvoir gave us one answer in 1949: because women are the second sex, the other sex, the sex to be explained. Men and women are not simply considered different from one another, as we speak of people differing in eye color, movie tastes, or preferences for ice cream. In almost every domain of life, men are considered the normal human being, and women are "ab-normal," deficient because they are different from men. Therefore, women constantly worry about measuring up, doing the right thing, being the right way. It is normal for women to worry about being abnormal,
- Publisher

Contents Introduction: The Universal Male 1 Measuring Up Why women are not inferior to men * Body: Beauty and the bust * Psyche: The problem of women * Brain: Dissecting the differences 2 Beautiful Souls and Different Voices Why women are not superior to men * Fighters and pacifists * The search for the feminist Eden * Moral voices, moral choices * Why opposites repel 3 The 70-Kilogram Man and the Pregnant Person Why women are not the same as men * The 70-kilogram man * Can women be "different" and "equal"? * The pregnant person: Woman as flowerpot * Women's rights versus equal rights 4 Misdiagnosing the Body Premenstrual syndrome, postmenstrual syndrome, and other normal "diseases" * The manufacture of "PMS" * Of menstruation and men: The story behind the headlines * Reading the body: The psychology of symptoms * Doctoring the failed female 5 Misdiagnosing the Mind Why women are "sick" but men have "problems" * How to create a mental illness: Are you a self-defeating personality? * How to create a social disease:Are you codependent? * Diagnosing the human condition 6 Bedtime Stories Three fables of female sexuality * The myth of the coy female * The myth of the lusty female * The parable of the G Spot * Beyond sexual "natures" 7 Love's Experts, Love's Victims How women cornered the love market * The feminizing of love * Economics and emotions * The sounds of silence * Love story 8 Speaking of Gender The darkened eye restored * The prover of context...and the context of power * The power of story: Gender as narrative * Choosing a story: Victims, survivors, and the problem of blame * Bridges Notes Bibliography Acknowledgments Index
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Carol Tavris

CAROL TAVRIS is a social psychologist and author of Anger and The Mismeasure of Woman. She has written for the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, Scientific American, and many other publications. She lives in Los Angeles.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 151727
  • Product Code 0671797492
  • EAN 9780671797492
  • Pages 400
  • Department General Books
  • Category Women
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Touchstone Press
  • Publication Date Feb 1993
  • Dimensions 217 x 140 x 24 mm
  • Weight 0.382kg

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