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New Cambridge: Revelation (New Cambridge Bible Commentary Series)

Ben Witherington

New Cambridge: Revelation (New Cambridge Bible Commentary Series)

Ben Witherington

$44.99

Paperback
This is the first of its kind: an innovative socio-rhetorical commentary on the Book of Revelation. Without sacrificing scholarly perspective or academic rigor, it is written to be accessible for a wide audience including pastors, scholars, teachers, seminarians, and interested lay people.

:A 'Suggested Reading List' a feature of all volumes in the New Cambridge Bible Commentary will serve as point of entry for the new student of Revelation and as a helpful annotated bibliography for all readers. Frequent 'Closer-Look' sections examine key elements of the Roman-Greco world that bear on the text's meaning while 'Bridging the Horizons' sub-chapters connect this world with the cultural, political, and religious environments of today. The entire NRSV translation is provided throughout the text. Award-winning author Ben Witherington, III brings a New Testament-scholar's insight and successful clergyman's lucidity to the often opaque passages of the last book of the New Testament.

'This is a highly accessible commentary on what most readers find the most difficult book in the New Testament. As well as relating Revelation to its late first century context and tracking its rhetorical force, Witherington strongly refutes some of the extraordinary misinterpretations of Revelation that are so influential in contemporary America. This is a commentary which a wide range of readers will find helpful for its clarity of explanation and its theological and pastoral relevance.'
Professor Richard Bauckham, University of St. Andrews, Scotland.

326 pages, from Cambridge University Press.

- Publisher "Written by a prolific evangelical scholar, this is a solid commentary on the New Testament's most enigmatic book. Witherington brings to this work his characteristic emphasis on the social context and literary stucture of the book in question. His extensive introduction is particularly helpful because it traces the history of interpretation of Revelation and charts where recent writings on the book stand. Along the way, the commentary is enhanced with explanations in bold print that take up particular historical issues or problems of interpretation." The Bible Today

- Publisher Part I. Introduction: 1. Authorship, date and audience of the apocalypse; 2. The resources, rhetoric and restructuring of Revelation; 3. Revelation in its social setting in West Asia Minor; 4. The christology of Revelation; 5. The genre of Revelation; 6. A brief tour of the Book of Revelation; Part II. Suggested Reading on Revelation: 1. The genre of Revelation; 2. Commentaries; 3. Rhetorical studies; 4. Sociological and anthropological approaches; 5. Classical and archeological resources; 6. History of interpretation; 7. Theology; 8. Important monographs; 9. Articles of interest; Part III. Commentary: 1. Rev. 1.1-3: Visionary material: handle carefully; 2. Rev. 1.4-1.20: The Heavenly Son of Man; 3. Rev. 2-3: postcards from the edge; 4. Rev. 4-5: the throne room vision; 5. Rev. 6.1-8.5: The Seven Seals; 6. Rev. 8.5-11: The Seven Trumpets; 7. Rev. 12: The woman and the dragon; 8. Rev. 13.1-14.5: 666 and his spokesman; 9. Rev. 14.6-14.20: Three angelic messengers; 10. Rev. 15.1-16.21: The seven eschatological plagues; 11. Rev. 17.1-19.10: Babylon the Harlot; 12. Rev. 19.11-21.8: The rider on the white horse, redemptive-judgment and the messianic millennium; 13. Rev. 21.9-22.5: The tour of the New Jerusalem; 14. Rev. 22.6-22.21: The epilogue; Part IV. Appendix: A Millennial Problem; Index.

- Publisher

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About "New Cambridge: Revelation (New Cambridge Bible Commentary Series)"

This is the first of its kind: an innovative socio-rhetorical commentary on the Book of Revelation. Without sacrificing scholarly perspective or academic rigor, it is written to be accessible for a wide audience including pastors, scholars, teachers, seminarians, and interested lay people.

:A 'Suggested Reading List' a feature of all volumes in the New Cambridge Bible Commentary will serve as point of entry for the new student of Revelation and as a helpful annotated bibliography for all readers. Frequent 'Closer-Look' sections examine key elements of the Roman-Greco world that bear on the text's meaning while 'Bridging the Horizons' sub-chapters connect this world with the cultural, political, and religious environments of today. The entire NRSV translation is provided throughout the text. Award-winning author Ben Witherington, III brings a New Testament-scholar's insight and successful clergyman's lucidity to the often opaque passages of the last book of the New Testament.

'This is a highly accessible commentary on what most readers find the most difficult book in the New Testament. As well as relating Revelation to its late first century context and tracking its rhetorical force, Witherington strongly refutes some of the extraordinary misinterpretations of Revelation that are so influential in contemporary America. This is a commentary which a wide range of readers will find helpful for its clarity of explanation and its theological and pastoral relevance.'
Professor Richard Bauckham, University of St. Andrews, Scotland.

326 pages, from Cambridge University Press.

- Publisher

"Written by a prolific evangelical scholar, this is a solid commentary on the New Testament's most enigmatic book. Witherington brings to this work his characteristic emphasis on the social context and literary stucture of the book in question. His extensive introduction is particularly helpful because it traces the history of interpretation of Revelation and charts where recent writings on the book stand. Along the way, the commentary is enhanced with explanations in bold print that take up particular historical issues or problems of interpretation." The Bible Today
- Publisher

Part I. Introduction: 1. Authorship, date and audience of the apocalypse; 2. The resources, rhetoric and restructuring of Revelation; 3. Revelation in its social setting in West Asia Minor; 4. The christology of Revelation; 5. The genre of Revelation; 6. A brief tour of the Book of Revelation; Part II. Suggested Reading on Revelation: 1. The genre of Revelation; 2. Commentaries; 3. Rhetorical studies; 4. Sociological and anthropological approaches; 5. Classical and archeological resources; 6. History of interpretation; 7. Theology; 8. Important monographs; 9. Articles of interest; Part III. Commentary: 1. Rev. 1.1-3: Visionary material: handle carefully; 2. Rev. 1.4-1.20: The Heavenly Son of Man; 3. Rev. 2-3: postcards from the edge; 4. Rev. 4-5: the throne room vision; 5. Rev. 6.1-8.5: The Seven Seals; 6. Rev. 8.5-11: The Seven Trumpets; 7. Rev. 12: The woman and the dragon; 8. Rev. 13.1-14.5: 666 and his spokesman; 9. Rev. 14.6-14.20: Three angelic messengers; 10. Rev. 15.1-16.21: The seven eschatological plagues; 11. Rev. 17.1-19.10: Babylon the Harlot; 12. Rev. 19.11-21.8: The rider on the white horse, redemptive-judgment and the messianic millennium; 13. Rev. 21.9-22.5: The tour of the New Jerusalem; 14. Rev. 22.6-22.21: The epilogue; Part IV. Appendix: A Millennial Problem; Index.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Ben Witherington

Ben Witherington III (Ph.D., University of Durham, England) is Amos Professor of New Testament for Doctoral Studies at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Kentucky, and is on the doctoral faculty at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland

He is the author of many books on the New Testament, including Women and the Genesis of Christianity (Cambridge University Press); Jesus the Sage (Fortress Press); The Jesus Quest (InterVarsity Press) and The Paul Quest (InterVarsity Press). With Hershel Shanks he is coauthor of The Brother of Jesus (HarperSanFrancisco), a book on the controversial James ossuary. A frequent contributor to Beliefnet.com, Witherington has also appeared on numerous TV news programs such as Dateline, 60 Minutes, 20/20 and the Peter Jennings ABC special Jesus and Paul--The Word and the Witness.

Dr Witherington has written a commentary on every book of the New Testament in a wide variety of series.

Table Of Contents

  • Part I. Introduction: 1. Authorship, Date And Audience Of The Apocalypse; 2. The Resources, Rhetoric And Restructuring Of Revelation; 3. Revelation In Its Social Setting In West Asia Minor; 4. The Christology Of Revelation; 5. The Genre Of Revelation; 6. A Brief Tour Of The Book Of Revelation; Part Ii. Suggested Reading On Revelation: 1. The Genre Of Revelation; 2. Commentaries; 3. Rhetorical Studies; 4. Sociological And Anthropological Approaches; 5. Classical And Archaeological Resources; 6. History Of Interpretation; 7. Theology; 8. Important Monographs; 9. Articles Of Interest; Part Iii. Commentary: 1. Rev. 1.1-3: Visionary Material: Handle Carefully; 2. Rev. 1.4-1.20: The Heavenly Son Of Man; 3. Rev. 2-3: Postcards From The Edge; 4. Rev. 4-5: The Throne Room Vision; 5. Rev. 6.1-8.5: The Seven Seals; 6. Rev. 8.5-11: The Seven Trumpets; 7. Rev. 12: The Woman And The Dragon; 8. Rev. 13.1-14.5: 666 And His Spokesman; 9. Rev. 14.6-14.20: Three Angelic Messengers; 10. Rev. 15.1-16.21: The Seven Eschatological Plagues; 11. Rev. 17.1-19.10: Babylon The Harlot; 12. Rev. 19.11-21.8: The Rider On The White Horse, Redemptive-judgment And The Messianic Millennium; 13. Rev. 21.9-22.5: The Tour Of The New Jerusalem; 14. Rev. 22.6-22.21: The Epilogue; Part Iv. Appendix: A Millennial Problem; Index.
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