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On the Genre and Message of Revelation

Bruce Malina

On the Genre and Message of Revelation

Bruce Malina

$65.00

Hardback
In a compelling new study based on ancient sources, Malina offers a new reading of Revelation. Malina contends that John the Seer's milieu was one of intense interest in and fascination with the sky; he asserts that John has his own interpretation of the sky that follows the Jewish and Christian story of God's salvation in Messiah. This vibrant reading of Revelation is buttressed by ancient literary and archaeological sources, maps, illustrations, and diagrams.

- Publisher As one of the pioneers of applying social criticism to the biblical text, author Bruce Malina has helped revolutionize the way we think about the text and our models for interpretation. Now in a compelling new study" and one that will surely be his most controversial" Malina offers a completely new lens for viewing the book of Revelation. Malina contends that John the Seer's milieu was one of intense interest and fascination with the sky, especially with those "beings" in the sky" constellations, planets, comets, sun, moon, and zodiac" that controlled the destiny of the Earth and its inhabitants. He asserts that John has his own interpretation of the sky that follows not the Greco-Roman astrological myths but the Jewish and Christian story of God's salvation in Messiah. John thus stands as an "astral prophet" who interprets the sky in accordance with what has taken place in Christ. This vibrant reading of Revelation is buttressed by innumerable ancient literary and archeological sources that demonstrate that John's world was indeed one enamored with the sky and its significance for planet Earth.According to Revelation 4:1, John the Seer looks in the sky and observes an "open door." Then the "first voice" invites John "up" to the heavens to witness what must take place. "In the spirit," John describes what he sees in the sky. Is John really looking at the sky? If he is, then what he sees are the fixtures of heaven: sun, moon, planets, stars, comets, and the like. Is it possible that John, in an effort to reach the people of his day, who were plainly enamored with the sky and its happenings, speaks to his contemporaries about the victory of God's Messiah as attested in the sky? Is Johnthe Seer's language of special numbers, brilliant colors, heavenly thrones, elders, angels, sun, moon, and stars more in keeping with descriptions of the sky than with apocalyptic visions? Bruce Malina thinks so, and he bui

- Publisher

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About "On the Genre and Message of Revelation"

In a compelling new study based on ancient sources, Malina offers a new reading of Revelation. Malina contends that John the Seer's milieu was one of intense interest in and fascination with the sky; he asserts that John has his own interpretation of the sky that follows the Jewish and Christian story of God's salvation in Messiah. This vibrant reading of Revelation is buttressed by ancient literary and archaeological sources, maps, illustrations, and diagrams.
- Publisher

As one of the pioneers of applying social criticism to the biblical text, author Bruce Malina has helped revolutionize the way we think about the text and our models for interpretation. Now in a compelling new study" and one that will surely be his most controversial" Malina offers a completely new lens for viewing the book of Revelation. Malina contends that John the Seer's milieu was one of intense interest and fascination with the sky, especially with those "beings" in the sky" constellations, planets, comets, sun, moon, and zodiac" that controlled the destiny of the Earth and its inhabitants. He asserts that John has his own interpretation of the sky that follows not the Greco-Roman astrological myths but the Jewish and Christian story of God's salvation in Messiah. John thus stands as an "astral prophet" who interprets the sky in accordance with what has taken place in Christ. This vibrant reading of Revelation is buttressed by innumerable ancient literary and archeological sources that demonstrate that John's world was indeed one enamored with the sky and its significance for planet Earth.According to Revelation 4:1, John the Seer looks in the sky and observes an "open door." Then the "first voice" invites John "up" to the heavens to witness what must take place. "In the spirit," John describes what he sees in the sky. Is John really looking at the sky? If he is, then what he sees are the fixtures of heaven: sun, moon, planets, stars, comets, and the like. Is it possible that John, in an effort to reach the people of his day, who were plainly enamored with the sky and its happenings, speaks to his contemporaries about the victory of God's Messiah as attested in the sky? Is Johnthe Seer's language of special numbers, brilliant colors, heavenly thrones, elders, angels, sun, moon, and stars more in keeping with descriptions of the sky than with apocalyptic visions? Bruce Malina thinks so, and he bui
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Bruce Malina

Bruce J. Malina, STD, is professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Creighton University in Omaha. He is the author of numerous works, including The New Testament World: Insights from Cultural Anthropology ( Louisville: Westminster/Knox, 3rd rev. ed., 2001); with John J. Pilch; Social Science Commentary on the Letters of Paul (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2006); and with John J. Pilch, Social Science Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2008).

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 93581
  • Product Code 1565630408
  • EAN 9781565630406
  • Pages 336
  • Department Academic
  • Category New Testament Commentaries
  • Sub-Category Revelation
  • Publisher Hendrickson Publishers
  • Publication Date Aug 1995
  • Dimensions 236 x 160 x 26 mm
  • Weight 0.800kg

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