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Power and Glory

Adam Nicolson
Power and Glory

Power and Glory

Adam Nicolson

$45.00

Hardback
James VI of Scotland - James I of England - came into his new kingdom in 1603. Trained almost from birth to manage rival political factions, he was determined not only to hold his throne, but to avoid the strife caused by religious groups that was bedevilling most European countries. He would hold his God-appointed position and unify his kingdom. Out of these circumstances, and involving the very people who were engaged in the bitterest controversies, a book of extraordinary grace and lasting literary appeal was created* the King James Bible. Scholars from Cambridge, Oxford and London translated the Bible, drawing from many previous versions, and created what many believe to be one of the greatest prose works ever written in English - the product of a culture in a peculiarly conflicted era. This was the England of Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson and Bacon; but also of extremist Puritans, the Gunpowder plot, the Plague, of slum dwellings and crushing religious confines. Quite how this astonishing translation emerges is the central question of this book.

- Publisher "James VI of Scotland - now James I of England - came into his new kingdom in 1603. Trained from birth to manage rival factions, he was determined to hold his God-appointed position and unify his realm." "The King James Bible is the greatest work of prose ever written. It is no coincidence that the translation was made at a time when Englishness and the English language had come into its first maturity. Boisterous, elegant, majestic and sonorous, the English of Jacobean England has a greater reach than any before or since. The age, with all its conflicts, explains the book." "The sponsor and guide of the whole Bible project was the King himself. His dream of a Jacobean peace, some sort of Eden in England, lies behind a book of extraordinary grace and everlasting literary power. About fifty scholars from Cambridge, Oxford and London did the work and that is the central question of this book: how did this group of near anonymous divines, muddled, drunk, self-serving, ruthless and obsequious, manage to bring off this astonishing translation, which has never been bettered?" "Adam Nicolson gives an account of the accession and ambition of the first Stuart king and of the scholars who laboured for seven years to create his Bible, immersing us in an age whose greatest monument is not a building but a book."--BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

- Publisher

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About "Power and Glory"

James VI of Scotland - James I of England - came into his new kingdom in 1603. Trained almost from birth to manage rival political factions, he was determined not only to hold his throne, but to avoid the strife caused by religious groups that was bedevilling most European countries. He would hold his God-appointed position and unify his kingdom. Out of these circumstances, and involving the very people who were engaged in the bitterest controversies, a book of extraordinary grace and lasting literary appeal was created* the King James Bible. Scholars from Cambridge, Oxford and London translated the Bible, drawing from many previous versions, and created what many believe to be one of the greatest prose works ever written in English - the product of a culture in a peculiarly conflicted era. This was the England of Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson and Bacon; but also of extremist Puritans, the Gunpowder plot, the Plague, of slum dwellings and crushing religious confines. Quite how this astonishing translation emerges is the central question of this book.
- Publisher

"James VI of Scotland - now James I of England - came into his new kingdom in 1603. Trained from birth to manage rival factions, he was determined to hold his God-appointed position and unify his realm." "The King James Bible is the greatest work of prose ever written. It is no coincidence that the translation was made at a time when Englishness and the English language had come into its first maturity. Boisterous, elegant, majestic and sonorous, the English of Jacobean England has a greater reach than any before or since. The age, with all its conflicts, explains the book." "The sponsor and guide of the whole Bible project was the King himself. His dream of a Jacobean peace, some sort of Eden in England, lies behind a book of extraordinary grace and everlasting literary power. About fifty scholars from Cambridge, Oxford and London did the work and that is the central question of this book: how did this group of near anonymous divines, muddled, drunk, self-serving, ruthless and obsequious, manage to bring off this astonishing translation, which has never been bettered?" "Adam Nicolson gives an account of the accession and ambition of the first Stuart king and of the scholars who laboured for seven years to create his Bible, immersing us in an age whose greatest monument is not a building but a book."--BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Adam Nicolson

Adam Nicolson is the author of many books on history, travel and the environment. He is winner of the Somerset Maugham Award and the British Topography Prize and lives at Sissinghust Castle in Kent.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 206528
  • Product Code 0007108931
  • EAN 9780007108930
  • Pages 288
  • Department Academic
  • Category History
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Harperone
  • Publication Date Jun 2003
  • Dimensions 240 x 159 mm
  • Weight 0.631kg

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