Back to Top
Our Stores Contact Us Help
Welcome, {{username}} Log Out Log In   /  Sign Up

Saving the Corporate Soul (Who Knows, Maybe Your Own)

David Batstone

Saving the Corporate Soul (Who Knows, Maybe Your Own)

David Batstone

$40.99

Hardback
The public furor over corporate irresponsibility is at an all-time high- and will continue as long as corporations make false promises and violate trust. And yet, most people have little choice- they must work or invest in corporations. How do we reconcile our cynicism with our need for meaning and trust on the job? How do we know if our corporation is on the right track- not just financially, but in every way? What are the subtle warning signs we can watch for and combat before it's too late? Saving the Corporate Soul- & (Who Knows?) Maybe Your Own provides the tools, strategies, and inspiration necessary for the revitalization of corporations and the people in them. In this unequivocal, hard-hitting book, David Batstone reveals eight clear principles for deciding whether an organization is as credible, trustworthy, and soluble as it seems- and details the vital signs by which to monitor these principles. Arguing that it's not necessary to sacrifice one's soul while building corporate and personal success, Batstone relates very personal "quiet hero" stories to illustrate how people have dealt with challenges to their own values as well as how corporations can put their structures at the service of the people they employ and serve. Saving the Corporate Soul- & (Who Knows?) Maybe Your Own is an essential read for executives, managers, employees, and entrepreneurs who want to identify trouble spots and help challenge and change bad practices. It is also for people who care about the work they do and the values their organization stands for.

- Publisher Batstone (Business 2.0 ) provides the tools, strategies, and inspiration to revitalize corporations and their employees. He describes eight principles for doing business honestly and openly and cites examples of firms like Timberland, GM, and Clif Bar candy as evidence that principled companies excel over the long haul. (Best Business Books 2003, Library Journal, March 15, 2004) "At this moment, the corporation sorely needs leaders...to live with soul," declares Batstone, a founding editor of Business 2.0 in this timely overview contrasting integrity-challenged companies with those that are both principled and profitable. Batstone concisely organizes his principles, laying out a variety of predicaments companies face and proposing alternatives that promise to win supporters rather than generate enemies and mass resignations by valued employees. Among his principles: connection with the community, customer care, valuing workers and respecting the environment. Batstone brings up financial reasons for companies to change their ethical tunes; he cites studies howing that people who are choosing an employer rank corporate reputation second and admits that consumers regard very few companies as excellent corporate citizens. Aware of potential resistance, Batstone explains how to adopt each principle in stages and provides practical guidelines for moving forward. In considering a company's environmental accountability, for example, he develops a 10-step plan to defuse environmental conflict among parties and repla ce screaming matches with mutually respectful discussions. Similarly fresh and useful are his thoughts on the challenges of globalization and deepening involvement with the community, two areas that many companies, including Nike and Home Depot, have found more perilous than they expected. Agent, Mark Tauber, (May) Forecast: Jossey-Bass plans to spread the word on Batstone's appealing principles with a $100,000 ad/promo budget that will include airport and transit advertising in New York, Washington, Boston and San Francisco. These efforts should make a good dent in the 100,000-copy first printing. (Publishers Weekly, April 7, 2003)

- Publisher Every day the media reports on the latest corporation guilty of financial misconduct and public deception. Insider trading, fraudulent accounting, outlandish executive pay and perks-- a steady stream of scandals scars the business landscape. But the corporate crisis is as much spiritual as it is financial. More than ever, the time is ripe for Saving the "Corporate Soul," In this hard-hitting, thought-provoking book, David Batstone shows that a corporation has the potential to act with soul when it aligns its missions with the values of its workers and puts its resources at the service of the people it employs and the public it serves. He offers companies and their employees eight sound principles for "doing the right thing" and-- citing examples from firms like Timberland, General Motors, Clif Bar, and BP-- offers evidence that principled companies will excel financially over the long haul. ^

- Publisher

You May Also Be Interested In

About "Saving the Corporate Soul (Who Knows, Maybe Your Own)"

The public furor over corporate irresponsibility is at an all-time high- and will continue as long as corporations make false promises and violate trust. And yet, most people have little choice- they must work or invest in corporations. How do we reconcile our cynicism with our need for meaning and trust on the job? How do we know if our corporation is on the right track- not just financially, but in every way? What are the subtle warning signs we can watch for and combat before it's too late? Saving the Corporate Soul- & (Who Knows?) Maybe Your Own provides the tools, strategies, and inspiration necessary for the revitalization of corporations and the people in them. In this unequivocal, hard-hitting book, David Batstone reveals eight clear principles for deciding whether an organization is as credible, trustworthy, and soluble as it seems- and details the vital signs by which to monitor these principles. Arguing that it's not necessary to sacrifice one's soul while building corporate and personal success, Batstone relates very personal "quiet hero" stories to illustrate how people have dealt with challenges to their own values as well as how corporations can put their structures at the service of the people they employ and serve. Saving the Corporate Soul- & (Who Knows?) Maybe Your Own is an essential read for executives, managers, employees, and entrepreneurs who want to identify trouble spots and help challenge and change bad practices. It is also for people who care about the work they do and the values their organization stands for.
- Publisher

Batstone (Business 2.0 ) provides the tools, strategies, and inspiration to revitalize corporations and their employees. He describes eight principles for doing business honestly and openly and cites examples of firms like Timberland, GM, and Clif Bar candy as evidence that principled companies excel over the long haul. (Best Business Books 2003, Library Journal, March 15, 2004) "At this moment, the corporation sorely needs leaders...to live with soul," declares Batstone, a founding editor of Business 2.0 in this timely overview contrasting integrity-challenged companies with those that are both principled and profitable. Batstone concisely organizes his principles, laying out a variety of predicaments companies face and proposing alternatives that promise to win supporters rather than generate enemies and mass resignations by valued employees. Among his principles: connection with the community, customer care, valuing workers and respecting the environment. Batstone brings up financial reasons for companies to change their ethical tunes; he cites studies howing that people who are choosing an employer rank corporate reputation second and admits that consumers regard very few companies as excellent corporate citizens. Aware of potential resistance, Batstone explains how to adopt each principle in stages and provides practical guidelines for moving forward. In considering a company's environmental accountability, for example, he develops a 10-step plan to defuse environmental conflict among parties and repla ce screaming matches with mutually respectful discussions. Similarly fresh and useful are his thoughts on the challenges of globalization and deepening involvement with the community, two areas that many companies, including Nike and Home Depot, have found more perilous than they expected. Agent, Mark Tauber, (May) Forecast: Jossey-Bass plans to spread the word on Batstone's appealing principles with a $100,000 ad/promo budget that will include airport and transit advertising in New York, Washington, Boston and San Francisco. These efforts should make a good dent in the 100,000-copy first printing. (Publishers Weekly, April 7, 2003)
- Publisher

Every day the media reports on the latest corporation guilty of financial misconduct and public deception. Insider trading, fraudulent accounting, outlandish executive pay and perks-- a steady stream of scandals scars the business landscape. But the corporate crisis is as much spiritual as it is financial. More than ever, the time is ripe for Saving the "Corporate Soul," In this hard-hitting, thought-provoking book, David Batstone shows that a corporation has the potential to act with soul when it aligns its missions with the values of its workers and puts its resources at the service of the people it employs and the public it serves. He offers companies and their employees eight sound principles for "doing the right thing" and-- citing examples from firms like Timberland, General Motors, Clif Bar, and BP-- offers evidence that principled companies will excel financially over the long haul. ^
- Publisher

Meet the Author

David Batstone

It is a rare set of skills that enable David Batstone to be active as a business entrepreneur, professor and journalist. Batstone is Senior Editor of Worthwhile magazine and the Executive Editor of Sojourners magazine. Batstone was also a founding editor of Business 2.0 magazine and a contributor to Worthwhile Magazine, The New York Times, Wired, The Chicago Tribune, Spin and The San Francisco Chronicle.He is the author of Not for Sale: The Return of the Global Slave Trade -- and How We Can Fight It, Saving the Corporate Soul: Balancing Purpose, Passion and Profit and Success Built to Last: Creating a Life that Matters. He is the recipient of two national journalist awards and named the National Endowment for the Humanities Chair at the University of San Francisco for his work in technology and ethics. Gifted as an entrepreneur, Batstone has played an executive role in a niche investment bank operating internationally in the entertainment and technology industries. During the 1980s, he founded and directed a non-governmental agency dedicated to economic development and human rights in Latin America.

Order now to secure your copy when our stock arrives.

0 Available. Expected to ship in 6 to 7 weeks from Australia.
Quantity

Add to Wishlist

Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 204208
  • Product Code 0787964808
  • EAN 9780787964801
  • Pages 288
  • Department Academic
  • Category Leadership
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Jossey Bass
  • Publication Date Mar 2003
  • Dimensions 238 x 158 x 26 mm
  • Weight 0.467kg

Bestsellers in Leadership