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St Basil: Address to Young Men on Greek Literature (Letters 249-368) (Loeb Classical Series)

Basil Saint

St Basil: Address to Young Men on Greek Literature (Letters 249-368) (Loeb Classical Series)

Basil Saint

$59.99

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Basil the Great was born ca. 330 CE at Caesarea in Cappadocia into a family noted for piety. He was at Constantinople and Athens for several years as a student with Gregory of Nazianzus and was much influenced by Origen. For a short time he held a chair of rhetoric at Caesarea, and was then baptized. He visited monasteries in Egypt and Palestine and sought out the most famous hermits in Syria and elsewhere to learn how to lead a pious and ascetic life; but he decided that communal monastic life and work were best. About 360 he founded in Pontus a convent to which his sister and widowed mother belonged. Ordained a presbyter in 365, in 370 he succeeded Eusebius in the archbishopric of Caesarea, which included authority over all Pontus. He died in 379. Even today his reform of monastic life in the east is the basis of modern Greek and Slavonic monasteries.^ The Loeb Classical Library edition of Basil's "Letters" is in four volumes.

- Publisher Letter Prefatory Note The Basil-Libanius Correspondence. CCXLIX. Without Address, With Reference To A Pious Man CCL. To Patrophilus, Bishop Of The Church Of Aegae CCLI. To The People Of Evabsae CCLII. To The Bishops Of The Diocese Of The Pontus CCLIII. To The Presbyters Of Antioch CCLIV. To Pelagius, Bishop Of Syrian Laodicea. CCLV. To Vitus, Bishop Or Charrae CCLVI. To Our Most Beloved And Reverend Brothers And Fellow-Presbyters, Acacius, Aetius, Paulus And Silvanus, And To The Deacons Silvinus And Lucius, And To The Best Of Our Brother Monks, From Basil, Bishop CCLVII. To Monks Harassed By The Arians CCLVIII. To Bishop Epiphanius CCLIX. To The Monks, Palladius And Innocent. CCLX. To Bishop Optimus CCLXI. To The People At Sozopolis CCLXII. To The Monk Urbicius CCLXIII. To The Westerners CCLXIV. To Barses, Bishop Of Edessa, While In Exile CCLXV. To Eulogius, Alexander, And Harpocration, Exiled Bishops Of Egypt CCLXVI. To Peter, Bishop Of Alexandria CCLXVII. To Barses, Bishop Of Odessa, While In Exile CCLXVIII. To Eusebius, While In Exile CCLXIX. To The Wife Of Arinthaeus, The General, In Consolation CCLXX. Without Address, Concerning Rape CCLXXI. To My Comrade Eusebius, In Recommendation Of Cyriacus The Presbyter CCLXXII. To Sophronius, The Master CCLXXIII. Without Address, About Hera CCLXXIV. To Himerius, The Master CCLXXV. Without Address, About Hera CCLXXVI. To The Elder Harmatius CCLXXVII. To The Learned Maximus CCLXXVIII. To Valerian CCLXXIX. To The Prefect Modestus CCLXXX. To The Prefect Modestum CCLXXXI. To The Prefect Modestus CCLXXXII. To A Bishop CCLXXXIII. To A Widow CCLXXXIV. To A Censitor, Regarding Monks CCLXXXV. Without Address, For The Protection Of The Church CCLXXXVI. To A Prison Superintendent CCLXXXVII. Without Address, Regarding Avengers CCLXXXVIII. Without Address, Regarding Avengers CCLXXXIX. Without Address, Regarding A Woman In Sore Distress CCXC. To Nectarius CCXCI. To Timotheus, The Chorepiscopus CCXCII. To Palladius CCXCIII. To Julian CCXCIV. To Festus And Magnus CCXCV. To Monks CCXCVI. To A Widow CCXCVII. To A Widow CCXCVIII. Without Address, Concerning A Devout Man CCXCIX. To An Assessor Of Taxes CCC. To The Father Of A Student Who Has Died, Consolatory CCCI. To Maximus, Consolatory CCCII. To The Wife Of Briso, Consolatory CCCIII. To The Comes Privatarum CCCIV. To Aburgius CCCV. Without Address, Concerning Certain Virtuous Men CCCVI. To The Governor Of Sebaste CCCVII. Without Address CCCVIII. Without Address, Concerning Protection CCCIX. Without Address, Concerning A Needy Person CCCX. Without Address, In Behalf Of Relatives CCCXI. To A Superior CCCXII. To An Assessor Of Taxes CCCXIII. To An Assessor Of Taxes CCCXIV. Without Address, Concerning A Servant CCCXV. Without Address, In Behalf Of A Relative CCCXVI. Without Address, In Behalf Of One Afflicted CCCXVII. Without Address, In Behalf Of A Needy Person CCCXVIII. Belonging To Basil, Without Address, In Behalf Of A Compatriot CCCXIX. Likewise, In Behalf Of A Stranger CCCXX. Without Address, Concerning A Salutation CCCXXI. To Thecla CCCXXII. Without Address, Concerning Spending Easter With A Friend CCCXXI

- Publisher

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About "St Basil: Address to Young Men on Greek Literature (Letters 249-368) (Loeb Classical Series)"

Basil the Great was born ca. 330 CE at Caesarea in Cappadocia into a family noted for piety. He was at Constantinople and Athens for several years as a student with Gregory of Nazianzus and was much influenced by Origen. For a short time he held a chair of rhetoric at Caesarea, and was then baptized. He visited monasteries in Egypt and Palestine and sought out the most famous hermits in Syria and elsewhere to learn how to lead a pious and ascetic life; but he decided that communal monastic life and work were best. About 360 he founded in Pontus a convent to which his sister and widowed mother belonged. Ordained a presbyter in 365, in 370 he succeeded Eusebius in the archbishopric of Caesarea, which included authority over all Pontus. He died in 379. Even today his reform of monastic life in the east is the basis of modern Greek and Slavonic monasteries.^ The Loeb Classical Library edition of Basil's "Letters" is in four volumes.
- Publisher

Letter Prefatory Note The Basil-Libanius Correspondence. CCXLIX. Without Address, With Reference To A Pious Man CCL. To Patrophilus, Bishop Of The Church Of Aegae CCLI. To The People Of Evabsae CCLII. To The Bishops Of The Diocese Of The Pontus CCLIII. To The Presbyters Of Antioch CCLIV. To Pelagius, Bishop Of Syrian Laodicea. CCLV. To Vitus, Bishop Or Charrae CCLVI. To Our Most Beloved And Reverend Brothers And Fellow-Presbyters, Acacius, Aetius, Paulus And Silvanus, And To The Deacons Silvinus And Lucius, And To The Best Of Our Brother Monks, From Basil, Bishop CCLVII. To Monks Harassed By The Arians CCLVIII. To Bishop Epiphanius CCLIX. To The Monks, Palladius And Innocent. CCLX. To Bishop Optimus CCLXI. To The People At Sozopolis CCLXII. To The Monk Urbicius CCLXIII. To The Westerners CCLXIV. To Barses, Bishop Of Edessa, While In Exile CCLXV. To Eulogius, Alexander, And Harpocration, Exiled Bishops Of Egypt CCLXVI. To Peter, Bishop Of Alexandria CCLXVII. To Barses, Bishop Of Odessa, While In Exile CCLXVIII. To Eusebius, While In Exile CCLXIX. To The Wife Of Arinthaeus, The General, In Consolation CCLXX. Without Address, Concerning Rape CCLXXI. To My Comrade Eusebius, In Recommendation Of Cyriacus The Presbyter CCLXXII. To Sophronius, The Master CCLXXIII. Without Address, About Hera CCLXXIV. To Himerius, The Master CCLXXV. Without Address, About Hera CCLXXVI. To The Elder Harmatius CCLXXVII. To The Learned Maximus CCLXXVIII. To Valerian CCLXXIX. To The Prefect Modestus CCLXXX. To The Prefect Modestum CCLXXXI. To The Prefect Modestus CCLXXXII. To A Bishop CCLXXXIII. To A Widow CCLXXXIV. To A Censitor, Regarding Monks CCLXXXV. Without Address, For The Protection Of The Church CCLXXXVI. To A Prison Superintendent CCLXXXVII. Without Address, Regarding Avengers CCLXXXVIII. Without Address, Regarding Avengers CCLXXXIX. Without Address, Regarding A Woman In Sore Distress CCXC. To Nectarius CCXCI. To Timotheus, The Chorepiscopus CCXCII. To Palladius CCXCIII. To Julian CCXCIV. To Festus And Magnus CCXCV. To Monks CCXCVI. To A Widow CCXCVII. To A Widow CCXCVIII. Without Address, Concerning A Devout Man CCXCIX. To An Assessor Of Taxes CCC. To The Father Of A Student Who Has Died, Consolatory CCCI. To Maximus, Consolatory CCCII. To The Wife Of Briso, Consolatory CCCIII. To The Comes Privatarum CCCIV. To Aburgius CCCV. Without Address, Concerning Certain Virtuous Men CCCVI. To The Governor Of Sebaste CCCVII. Without Address CCCVIII. Without Address, Concerning Protection CCCIX. Without Address, Concerning A Needy Person CCCX. Without Address, In Behalf Of Relatives CCCXI. To A Superior CCCXII. To An Assessor Of Taxes CCCXIII. To An Assessor Of Taxes CCCXIV. Without Address, Concerning A Servant CCCXV. Without Address, In Behalf Of A Relative CCCXVI. Without Address, In Behalf Of One Afflicted CCCXVII. Without Address, In Behalf Of A Needy Person CCCXVIII. Belonging To Basil, Without Address, In Behalf Of A Compatriot CCCXIX. Likewise, In Behalf Of A Stranger CCCXX. Without Address, Concerning A Salutation CCCXXI. To Thecla CCCXXII. Without Address, Concerning Spending Easter With A Friend CCCXXI
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