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The Date of Mark's Gospel (Journal For The Study Of The New Testament Supplement Series)

James Crossley

The Date of Mark's Gospel (Journal For The Study Of The New Testament Supplement Series)

James Crossley

$108.90

Paperback
This book argues that Mark's Gospel was not written as late as c.65-75 CE, but dates from sometime between the late 30s and early 40s CE. It challenges the use of the external evidence (such as Irenaeus and Clement of Alexandria) often used for dating Mark, relying instead on internal evidence from the gospel itself. James Crossley also questions the view that Mark 13 reflects the Jewish war, arguing that there are other plausible historical settings -- for example the Caligula crises -- going on, to critically examine other arguments that place the writing of Mark as either around the time of the Jewish war, or at least after Paul's letters.;The Date of Mark's Gospel argues that the gospel makes numerous Jewish assumptions, particularly concerning law observance. It shows that the synoptic gospels all portray Jesus as a law-observant Jew, before arguing more specifically that Mark assumes that Jesus fully observed biblical law*, while Matthew and Luke had to make this explicit. Mark could only make such an assumption at a time when Christianity was largely law observant* and this could not have been later than the mid-40s, after which certain Jewish and gentile Christians were no longer observing some biblical laws (e.g. food, Sabbath).

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About "The Date of Mark's Gospel (Journal For The Study Of The New Testament Supplement Series)"

This book argues that Mark's Gospel was not written as late as c.65-75 CE, but dates from sometime between the late 30s and early 40s CE. It challenges the use of the external evidence (such as Irenaeus and Clement of Alexandria) often used for dating Mark, relying instead on internal evidence from the gospel itself. James Crossley also questions the view that Mark 13 reflects the Jewish war, arguing that there are other plausible historical settings -- for example the Caligula crises -- going on, to critically examine other arguments that place the writing of Mark as either around the time of the Jewish war, or at least after Paul's letters.;The Date of Mark's Gospel argues that the gospel makes numerous Jewish assumptions, particularly concerning law observance. It shows that the synoptic gospels all portray Jesus as a law-observant Jew, before arguing more specifically that Mark assumes that Jesus fully observed biblical law*, while Matthew and Luke had to make this explicit. Mark could only make such an assumption at a time when Christianity was largely law observant* and this could not have been later than the mid-40s, after which certain Jewish and gentile Christians were no longer observing some biblical laws (e.g. food, Sabbath).
- Publisher

Meet the Author

James Crossley

James G. Crossley (Ph.D., University of Nottingham) is lecturer in New Testament at the University of Sheffield. He is the author of The Date of Mark's Gospel: Insight from the Law in Earliest Christianity; Why Christianity Happened: A Sociohistorical Account of Christian Origins 26-50 CE; Jesus in an Age of Terror: Scholarly Projects for a New American Century and with Michael F. Bird, How Did Christianity Begin?: A Believer and Non-Believer Examine the Evidence. Most recently he has released The New Testament and Jewish Law: A Guide for the Perplexed

Table Of Contents

  • Introduction; Part 1: The External Evidence; Irenaeus And The 'anti-marcionite' Prologue; Clement Of Alexandria; 'the Second Year Of Claudius'; First Century Evidence For Peter In Rome During The Forties? Papias And Markan Authorship; M. Hengel On Gospel Authorship; Conclusions; Part 2: Mark 13; N. T. Wright And The Historicity Of Mark 13; The Abomination Of The Desolation; The Caligula Crisis And Mark 13; Other Possible Historical Contexts: From The Mid-thirties To The Jewish War; Antichrist, Unfulfilled Prophecies And The Problems With Dating; Mark 13 And The Jewish War; The Narrative Frame: Mark 13:1-2; Conclusions; Part 3: The Date Of Mark And Modern Gospel Criticism; Source Criticism; Paul As A Source For Mark? Form Criticism; The Composition Of Mark's Gospel; Redaction And Literary Criticisms; D. Seeley On Mark 11:15-17; G. Theissen And J. Marcus On Mark 11:15-17; Mark 11:15-17: From The Historical Jesus To Markan Redaction; Marken Replacement Symbolism; Marken Redaction, The Jewish War And Nationalistic Movements; Markan Redaction And Persecution; A New (-ish) Approach To The Date Of Mark; Conclusions; Part 4: Jesus' Torah Observance In The Synoptic Gospels; Jesus And The Torah According To Mark; Jesus And The Torah According To Matthew; Jesus And The Torah According To Luke; Conclusions; Part 5: The Torah And Earliest Christianity; Stephen And The 'hellenists'; Zeal For The Law; Paul's Early Attitude Towards The Law; Peter's Vision (acts 10-11:18); The Antoich Controversy (gal. 2:11-14); The Jerusalem Conference; Christianity And The Law In The Forties; Conclusions; Part 6: Dating Mark Legally (i): 2 Test Cases (mk 2:23-28); Mt. 10:1-12; Sabbath: Dating Mark Through Mark 2:23-28 And Parallels; Divorce And Remarriage: Dating Mark Through Mark 10:2-12 And Parallels; Conclusions; Part 7: Dating Mark Legally (ii): Mark 7:1-23; Handwashing - Mark 7:4 And Other Traditions; Qorban - Mark 7:1-23 And 'tradition'; The Transmission Of Impurity; Tebul Yom; Gospel Editing; Conclusions
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