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The Faith

Brian Moynahan

The Faith

Brian Moynahan

$59.99

Hardback
Chapter I The Cross Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani?" cried the dying man. "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" (Matt. 27:46). This forlorn reproach was delivered from a hillside on the periphery of the Roman Empire, in a strange tongue unknown to the vast majority of its subjects, by a condemned man of profound obscurity who had an alien belief in a single God. A darkening sky; a claim that the veil in the Temple of Solomon, far down the slope from the execution ground, was "rent in twain" at the moment of death; a strange earthquake, mentioned only in Matthew's gospel, that split open rocks and opened tombs but did no damage to buildings--the Father's response to the crucifixion of the Son was modest even in the Gospels that proclaimed it. Human reaction was as muted. The Roman governor who had authorized the execution--with such extreme reluctance that some Christians later honored his memory with a feast day--marveled only that Jesus had died so swiftly, in little more than three hours. To the soldiers who carried it out, the crucifixion was mere routine, a standard punishment for slaves and non-Romans, that ended in the traditional perk of sharing out the victim's clothes. The priests who had demanded the death noted with sarcastic satisfaction: "he saved others, himself he cannot save" (Matt. 27:42). No disciple or relative was bold enough to claim the body for burial. He had been almost recklessly brave at his trial; they had expected miracles at his death, and none had occurred. They hid their ebbing belief behind barred doors in the steep streets of Jerusalem. The painters and sculptors who were to fill the world with his image worked from imagination alone. No physical description of Jesus was left by any who knew him; no hint existed of the color of the eyes, the timbre of the voice, the carriage of the head. His age, and the year of his birth and death, is not accurately recorded. The abbot Dionysius Exiguus, who created our system of dating years from the conception of Christ, as anno Domini, the year of the Lord, made his calculations five hundred years later. The abbot estimated that Jesus was born in the year 753 a.u.c. of the Roman system of dating ab urbe condita, "from the founding of the city" of Rome. He set this as a.d. 1, with previous years in receding order as "before Christ," b.c. or a.c. for ante Christum in Latin. But Matthew's gospel says that Jesus was "born in Bethlehem . . . in the days of Herod the King." Herod is known to have died in 4 b.c., and most modern scholars date Jesus' birth to 6 or 5 b.c.* The dates of his brief ministry--John's gospel supports a ministry of two or three years, the others of a single year--and his final journey to Jerusalem are also uncertain. The crucifixion may have been as early as a.d. 27, instead of the traditional date of a.d. 33; it is certain only that he died on a Friday in the Jewish lunar month of Nisan, which straddles March and April. A single incident is known of his childhood; as a twelve-year-old, he went missing on a visit from his native town of Nazareth to Jerusalem until his parents found him in the temple, "sitting in the midst of the doctors both hearing them and asking questions" (Luke 2:46). He may--or may not--have worked as a carpenter in his youth. His public ministry probably lasted little more than two years at most and seemed fragile and incomplete. His teaching was informal, often in the open air; his message was literally hearsay, for no contemporary notes were written down. It demanded an absolute morality and selflessness never expressed before; it lacked the familiar comfort of an established rite, and he had taught only a single prayer, the brief formula beginning "Our Father, which art in heaven . .

- Publisher In this brilliant, beautifully written chronicle of the faith that changed the world, Brian Moynahan, a former writer for the London Sunday Times, re-creates two thousand years of change and challenge with journalistic immediacy and scholarly precision. Unprecedented in both scope and depth, "The Faith" presents the watershed events and the people -- from religious leaders to heretics, popes to politicians -- that influenced the evolution of the Church and the course of secular history as well.^The book begins with the story of Jesus himself, discussing his teachings, his Resurrection, and the spreading of the Gospels. Moynahan covers in lucid detail the battle between the Hebrews and the Greeks, Nero's persecution of early Christians, and the lives and significance of the first martyrs. In tracing the growing power of the young religion and its spread throughout Europe, he describes the growth of monasteries, the impact of Islam, the tragedy of the Crusades, the building of great cathedrals, and the corruption of the Church. His insightful discussions of the Reformation, the Catholic Counter-Reformation, the Inquisition, and the rise of religious dissent takes readers from the turbulence that shook Europe to the search for religious freedom in the Americas. With objectivity and intelligence, Moynahan writes about the impact on Christian belief and practice of the Age of Enlightenment, the infamous New England witch trails, and today's controversial televang

- Publisher The grand, sweeping, often triumphant and sometimes desperate story of Christianity from the birth of Jesus to the present. Covering the early Church, the rise fo the papacy, the great schism, the Crusades, the Middle Ages, the Reformation, missionaries and much more.

- Publisher

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About "The Faith"

Chapter I The Cross Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani?" cried the dying man. "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" (Matt. 27:46). This forlorn reproach was delivered from a hillside on the periphery of the Roman Empire, in a strange tongue unknown to the vast majority of its subjects, by a condemned man of profound obscurity who had an alien belief in a single God. A darkening sky; a claim that the veil in the Temple of Solomon, far down the slope from the execution ground, was "rent in twain" at the moment of death; a strange earthquake, mentioned only in Matthew's gospel, that split open rocks and opened tombs but did no damage to buildings--the Father's response to the crucifixion of the Son was modest even in the Gospels that proclaimed it. Human reaction was as muted. The Roman governor who had authorized the execution--with such extreme reluctance that some Christians later honored his memory with a feast day--marveled only that Jesus had died so swiftly, in little more than three hours. To the soldiers who carried it out, the crucifixion was mere routine, a standard punishment for slaves and non-Romans, that ended in the traditional perk of sharing out the victim's clothes. The priests who had demanded the death noted with sarcastic satisfaction: "he saved others, himself he cannot save" (Matt. 27:42). No disciple or relative was bold enough to claim the body for burial. He had been almost recklessly brave at his trial; they had expected miracles at his death, and none had occurred. They hid their ebbing belief behind barred doors in the steep streets of Jerusalem. The painters and sculptors who were to fill the world with his image worked from imagination alone. No physical description of Jesus was left by any who knew him; no hint existed of the color of the eyes, the timbre of the voice, the carriage of the head. His age, and the year of his birth and death, is not accurately recorded. The abbot Dionysius Exiguus, who created our system of dating years from the conception of Christ, as anno Domini, the year of the Lord, made his calculations five hundred years later. The abbot estimated that Jesus was born in the year 753 a.u.c. of the Roman system of dating ab urbe condita, "from the founding of the city" of Rome. He set this as a.d. 1, with previous years in receding order as "before Christ," b.c. or a.c. for ante Christum in Latin. But Matthew's gospel says that Jesus was "born in Bethlehem . . . in the days of Herod the King." Herod is known to have died in 4 b.c., and most modern scholars date Jesus' birth to 6 or 5 b.c.* The dates of his brief ministry--John's gospel supports a ministry of two or three years, the others of a single year--and his final journey to Jerusalem are also uncertain. The crucifixion may have been as early as a.d. 27, instead of the traditional date of a.d. 33; it is certain only that he died on a Friday in the Jewish lunar month of Nisan, which straddles March and April. A single incident is known of his childhood; as a twelve-year-old, he went missing on a visit from his native town of Nazareth to Jerusalem until his parents found him in the temple, "sitting in the midst of the doctors both hearing them and asking questions" (Luke 2:46). He may--or may not--have worked as a carpenter in his youth. His public ministry probably lasted little more than two years at most and seemed fragile and incomplete. His teaching was informal, often in the open air; his message was literally hearsay, for no contemporary notes were written down. It demanded an absolute morality and selflessness never expressed before; it lacked the familiar comfort of an established rite, and he had taught only a single prayer, the brief formula beginning "Our Father, which art in heaven . .
- Publisher

In this brilliant, beautifully written chronicle of the faith that changed the world, Brian Moynahan, a former writer for the London Sunday Times, re-creates two thousand years of change and challenge with journalistic immediacy and scholarly precision. Unprecedented in both scope and depth, "The Faith" presents the watershed events and the people -- from religious leaders to heretics, popes to politicians -- that influenced the evolution of the Church and the course of secular history as well.^The book begins with the story of Jesus himself, discussing his teachings, his Resurrection, and the spreading of the Gospels. Moynahan covers in lucid detail the battle between the Hebrews and the Greeks, Nero's persecution of early Christians, and the lives and significance of the first martyrs. In tracing the growing power of the young religion and its spread throughout Europe, he describes the growth of monasteries, the impact of Islam, the tragedy of the Crusades, the building of great cathedrals, and the corruption of the Church. His insightful discussions of the Reformation, the Catholic Counter-Reformation, the Inquisition, and the rise of religious dissent takes readers from the turbulence that shook Europe to the search for religious freedom in the Americas. With objectivity and intelligence, Moynahan writes about the impact on Christian belief and practice of the Age of Enlightenment, the infamous New England witch trails, and today's controversial televang
- Publisher

The grand, sweeping, often triumphant and sometimes desperate story of Christianity from the birth of Jesus to the present. Covering the early Church, the rise fo the papacy, the great schism, the Crusades, the Middle Ages, the Reformation, missionaries and much more.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Brian Moynahan

BRIAN MOYNAHAN graduated with honors from Cambridge University and embarked on a career as an author and journalist. He served on the staff of "The Yorkshire Post," "Town" Magazine, and "The Times" (London). Since 1989, he has concentrated on writing histories while continuing to write for British and American newspapers. His previous books include "Airport International," "Fool's Paradise," "Claws of the Bear," "Comrades," "The Russian Century," and "A Biography of Rasputin."

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 182550
  • Product Code 038549114X
  • EAN 9780385491143
  • Pages 356
  • Department Academic
  • Category History
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Doubleday
  • Publication Date Apr 2002
  • Dimensions 230 x 196 x 42 mm
  • Weight 1.393kg

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