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The Great and Holy War: How World War 1 Changed Religion For Ever

Philip Jenkins

The Great and Holy War: How World War 1 Changed Religion For Ever

Philip Jenkins

$16.99

Paperback
The war was fought by the world's leading Christian nations, who presented the conflict as a holy war. A steady stream of patriotic and militaristic rhetoric was served to an unprecedented audience, using language that spoke of holy war and crusade, of apocalypse and Armageddon. But this rhetoric was not mere state propaganda. Philip Jenkins reveals how the widespread belief in angels, apparitions, and the supernatural, was a driving force throughout the war and shaped all three of the Abrahamic religions - Christianity, Judaism, and Islam - paving the way for modern views of religion and violence. The disappointed hopes and moral compromises that followed the war also shaped the political climate of the rest of the century, giving rise to such phenomena as Nazism, totalitarianism, and communism. Connecting remarkable incidents and characters - from Karl Barth to Carl Jung, the Christmas Truce to the Armenian Genocide - Jenkins creates a powerful and persuasive narrative that brings together global politics, history, and spiritual crisis.We cannot understand our present religious, political, and cultural climate without understanding the dramatic changes initiated by the First World War. The war created the world's religious map as we know it today.

- Publisher

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About "The Great and Holy War: How World War 1 Changed Religion For Ever"

The war was fought by the world's leading Christian nations, who presented the conflict as a holy war. A steady stream of patriotic and militaristic rhetoric was served to an unprecedented audience, using language that spoke of holy war and crusade, of apocalypse and Armageddon. But this rhetoric was not mere state propaganda. Philip Jenkins reveals how the widespread belief in angels, apparitions, and the supernatural, was a driving force throughout the war and shaped all three of the Abrahamic religions - Christianity, Judaism, and Islam - paving the way for modern views of religion and violence. The disappointed hopes and moral compromises that followed the war also shaped the political climate of the rest of the century, giving rise to such phenomena as Nazism, totalitarianism, and communism. Connecting remarkable incidents and characters - from Karl Barth to Carl Jung, the Christmas Truce to the Armenian Genocide - Jenkins creates a powerful and persuasive narrative that brings together global politics, history, and spiritual crisis.We cannot understand our present religious, political, and cultural climate without understanding the dramatic changes initiated by the First World War. The war created the world's religious map as we know it today.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Philip Jenkins

Philip Jenkins (Ph.D., University of Cambridge) has taught at Penn State University since 1980, and currently holds the rank of Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of the Humanities in History and Religious Studies. His book The Next Christendom was named one of the top religion books of 2002 by USA Today. He has published articles and op-ed pieces in the Wall Street Journal, New Republic, Atlantic Monthly, Washington Post, Boston Globe, and other top media outlets. Most recently he has released The Lost History Of Christianity and Hidden Gospels: How the Search for Jesus Lost Its Way.
Koorong -Editorial Review.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 416544
  • Product Code 9780745956732
  • ISBN 0745956734
  • EAN 9780745956732
  • Pages 448
  • Department Academic
  • Category History
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Lion Hudson Publishing
  • Publication Date Mar 2015
  • Sales Rank #11226
  • Dimensions 198 x 129 mm
  • Weight 0.470kg

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