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The Ice and the Inland

Brigid Hains

The Ice and the Inland

Brigid Hains

$49.99

Hardback
At the beginning of the 20th century, much of inland Australia comprised what freelance historian and writer Hains calls an ecological frontier, that is, a frontier not because it was unmapped but because the conditions made it a difficult target for imperialist exploitation. She shows the roles Antarctic explorer Douglas Mawson (1882-1958) and minister John Flynn (1880-1951) played in establishing the idea of the frontier in Australian consciousness. Distributed in the US by Paul and Company, a division of IPG. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

- Publisher Comparative biographies of two Australian legends, Antarctic explorer Douglas Mawson and leader of the Australian Inland Mission, John Flynn. Discusses the iconic status given to these folk heroes and criticises the myth of the Australian frontier of the early 20th century that they promoted. The narrative traces the literary and political traditions that prompted the two journeys, including imperial adventure fiction, the media hype surrounding polar exploration, the rural life movement and population theory. Uses previously unpublished diary entries, letters and articles written by the explorers. Includes full-colour photos, maps, illustrations, conversions, notes, bibliography and index. Author is a freelance historian and writer.

- Publisher An elegant, original and very well written book, luminous with meaning, full of superb cameos and suggestive arguments ... the central figures are both charismatic, articulate and iconic: they are central to any estimation of twentieth-century Australian cultural and environmental history.-Dr Tom Griffiths, Australian National University This is a path-breaking work ... the environmental aspect of the work is powerful, and there are some wonderful ideas about what is 'civilised' and what is 'wilderness'. Brigid Hains has reinvigorated the tradition of 'frontier studies'. -Dr Jane Carruthers, University of South Africa The frontier mythology of the early twentieth century laid the groundwork for the wilderness cult of contemporary Australian life. It became etched in the Australian imagination through the image of folk heroes such as Douglas Mawson and John Flynn, promising national renewal through virile heroism and an encounter with 'wild' nature. Most frontier histories in Australia have focused on race relations; this is among the first to focus on the frontier as an ecological phenomenon. It draws on rich primary sources, many of which have never been published, including Antarctic diaries, and the letters and journalism of John Flynn. In this superb account Brigid Hains offers: -a new interpretation of two Australian folk heroes and their iconic status in Australian culture -a fresh approach to frontier history that focuses on the landscape rather than on racial conflict, and -an explanation of the origins of wilderness conservation in Australia. Mawson's Antarctic exploration and Flynn's Australian Inland Mission both drew on imperial and trans-Pacific influences, such as imperial adventure literature, the cult of polar exploration, the rural life movement, population theory and eugenics. The Ice and the Inland compares these two Australian folk heroes and analyses the reasons for their popularity. It raises a number of topical issues, including the role of Australia in the international management of Antarctica; Flynn's treatment of Aboriginal people; the reasons for conservation of Australia's wild places, from the arid Centre to the frozen wastes of Antarctica; and relationships between the country and the bush, and between the metropolis and the frontier.

- Publisher

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About "The Ice and the Inland"

At the beginning of the 20th century, much of inland Australia comprised what freelance historian and writer Hains calls an ecological frontier, that is, a frontier not because it was unmapped but because the conditions made it a difficult target for imperialist exploitation. She shows the roles Antarctic explorer Douglas Mawson (1882-1958) and minister John Flynn (1880-1951) played in establishing the idea of the frontier in Australian consciousness. Distributed in the US by Paul and Company, a division of IPG. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
- Publisher

Comparative biographies of two Australian legends, Antarctic explorer Douglas Mawson and leader of the Australian Inland Mission, John Flynn. Discusses the iconic status given to these folk heroes and criticises the myth of the Australian frontier of the early 20th century that they promoted. The narrative traces the literary and political traditions that prompted the two journeys, including imperial adventure fiction, the media hype surrounding polar exploration, the rural life movement and population theory. Uses previously unpublished diary entries, letters and articles written by the explorers. Includes full-colour photos, maps, illustrations, conversions, notes, bibliography and index. Author is a freelance historian and writer.
- Publisher

An elegant, original and very well written book, luminous with meaning, full of superb cameos and suggestive arguments ... the central figures are both charismatic, articulate and iconic: they are central to any estimation of twentieth-century Australian cultural and environmental history.-Dr Tom Griffiths, Australian National University This is a path-breaking work ... the environmental aspect of the work is powerful, and there are some wonderful ideas about what is 'civilised' and what is 'wilderness'. Brigid Hains has reinvigorated the tradition of 'frontier studies'. -Dr Jane Carruthers, University of South Africa The frontier mythology of the early twentieth century laid the groundwork for the wilderness cult of contemporary Australian life. It became etched in the Australian imagination through the image of folk heroes such as Douglas Mawson and John Flynn, promising national renewal through virile heroism and an encounter with 'wild' nature. Most frontier histories in Australia have focused on race relations; this is among the first to focus on the frontier as an ecological phenomenon. It draws on rich primary sources, many of which have never been published, including Antarctic diaries, and the letters and journalism of John Flynn. In this superb account Brigid Hains offers: -a new interpretation of two Australian folk heroes and their iconic status in Australian culture -a fresh approach to frontier history that focuses on the landscape rather than on racial conflict, and -an explanation of the origins of wilderness conservation in Australia. Mawson's Antarctic exploration and Flynn's Australian Inland Mission both drew on imperial and trans-Pacific influences, such as imperial adventure literature, the cult of polar exploration, the rural life movement, population theory and eugenics. The Ice and the Inland compares these two Australian folk heroes and analyses the reasons for their popularity. It raises a number of topical issues, including the role of Australia in the international management of Antarctica; Flynn's treatment of Aboriginal people; the reasons for conservation of Australia's wild places, from the arid Centre to the frozen wastes of Antarctica; and relationships between the country and the bush, and between the metropolis and the frontier.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Brigid Hains

Brigid holds a PhD in history and a graduate diploma in museum studies, is the lecturer in public history at Monash University in Victoria, Australia.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 225791
  • Product Code 0522850367
  • EAN 9780522850369
  • Pages 264
  • Department Academic
  • Category Science
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Melbourne University Press
  • Publication Date Oct 2002
  • Dimensions 246 x 161 x 15 mm
  • Weight 0.410kg

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