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The Kierkegaard Reader

Jane Chamberlain (Ed)Jonathan Ree (Ed)

The Kierkegaard Reader

Jane Chamberlain (Ed)Jonathan Ree (Ed)

$73.99

Paperback
9780631204688

- Publisher Acknowledgements. Introduction: Becoming a Philosopher. 1. Journals and Notebooks: 2. The Concept of Irony (1841): For Orientation. Irony after Fichte. 3. Either/Or (1843): Crop Rotation. 4. Fear and Trembling (1843): Preface. Attunement. Problema I. Problema III. Epilogue. 5. Repetition (1843): A Report by Constantin Constantius. 6. Philosophical Fragments (1844): Preface. Interlude. Is the Past More Necessary Than the Future? Or: Does the Possible Become More Necessary by Becoming Actual? 1. Coming into Existence. 2. The Historical. 3. The Past. 4. The Apprehension of the Past. 7. The Concept of Anxiety (1844): Preface. Introduction. Anxiety as the Consequence of That Sin Which is Absence of the Consciousness of Sin. Anxiety as Saving Through Faith. 8. Prefaces (1844): Preface. 9. Concluding Unscientific Postscript (1846): Possible and Actual Theses by Lessing. Thesis 1. Thesis 2. Thesis 4. Actual Ethical Subjectivity. Towards an Understanding with My Reader. A First and Last Explanation. 10. My Work as an Author (1850, 1859): On my Work as an Author. The Accounting. The Point of View for my Work as an Author. Introduction. Part One:. A: The Ambiguity or Duplicity in the Whole Authorship. B: The Explanation. Part Two: The Whole Work of Authorship. Chapter One. A: The Aesthetic Works. B: Concluding Unscientific Postscript. C: The Religious Works. Chapter Two: The difference in My Personal Mode of Existence. A: In Relation to the Aesthetic Works. B: In Relation to the Religious Works. Chapter Three: The Share Divine Governance Had in My Authorship. Epilogue. Conclusion. 11. Johannes Climacus, or De Omnibus Dubitandum Est (1842, 1869): Introduction. Part One, In which Johannes Begins to Philosophise with the Help of Traditional Ideas. Introduction. Chapter One: Modern Philosophy Begins with Doubt. 1 How Should the Third Thesis be Understood Literally. 2 How Did it Come to Pass that Modern Philosophy Began with Doubt? (a) Was it by Accident That Modern Philosophy Began with Doubt? (b) Was it by Necessity that Modern Philosophy Began with Doubt? 3. Intimations. Chapter Two: Philosophy Begins with Doubt. 1. Is the First Thesis Identical with Thesis Three? 2. How Does the Individual Relate to the First Thesis? (a) How Does an Individual who Affirms the First Thesis Relate to It? (b) How Does the Individual to Whom the First Thesis is Proposed Relate to the Individual who Propounds It? Chapter Three: In Order to Philosophise One Must Have Doubted. Part Two, In Which Johannes Tries to Think Propriis Auspiciis (On His Own Account) De Omnibus Dubitandum Est. Introduction. Chapter One: What Is It To Doubt?. 1. How Must Existence be Constituted in Order for Doubt to be Possible? Kierkegaard's Works and their Authors. Bibliography. Glossary. Index.

- Publisher The anthology makes use of a range of classic translations, and includes new translations by Jane Chamberlain and Jonathan RUe, explanatory introductions, an index and a glossary.

- Publisher

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About "The Kierkegaard Reader"

9780631204688
- Publisher

Acknowledgements. Introduction: Becoming a Philosopher. 1. Journals and Notebooks: 2. The Concept of Irony (1841): For Orientation. Irony after Fichte. 3. Either/Or (1843): Crop Rotation. 4. Fear and Trembling (1843): Preface. Attunement. Problema I. Problema III. Epilogue. 5. Repetition (1843): A Report by Constantin Constantius. 6. Philosophical Fragments (1844): Preface. Interlude. Is the Past More Necessary Than the Future? Or: Does the Possible Become More Necessary by Becoming Actual? 1. Coming into Existence. 2. The Historical. 3. The Past. 4. The Apprehension of the Past. 7. The Concept of Anxiety (1844): Preface. Introduction. Anxiety as the Consequence of That Sin Which is Absence of the Consciousness of Sin. Anxiety as Saving Through Faith. 8. Prefaces (1844): Preface. 9. Concluding Unscientific Postscript (1846): Possible and Actual Theses by Lessing. Thesis 1. Thesis 2. Thesis 4. Actual Ethical Subjectivity. Towards an Understanding with My Reader. A First and Last Explanation. 10. My Work as an Author (1850, 1859): On my Work as an Author. The Accounting. The Point of View for my Work as an Author. Introduction. Part One:. A: The Ambiguity or Duplicity in the Whole Authorship. B: The Explanation. Part Two: The Whole Work of Authorship. Chapter One. A: The Aesthetic Works. B: Concluding Unscientific Postscript. C: The Religious Works. Chapter Two: The difference in My Personal Mode of Existence. A: In Relation to the Aesthetic Works. B: In Relation to the Religious Works. Chapter Three: The Share Divine Governance Had in My Authorship. Epilogue. Conclusion. 11. Johannes Climacus, or De Omnibus Dubitandum Est (1842, 1869): Introduction. Part One, In which Johannes Begins to Philosophise with the Help of Traditional Ideas. Introduction. Chapter One: Modern Philosophy Begins with Doubt. 1 How Should the Third Thesis be Understood Literally. 2 How Did it Come to Pass that Modern Philosophy Began with Doubt? (a) Was it by Accident That Modern Philosophy Began with Doubt? (b) Was it by Necessity that Modern Philosophy Began with Doubt? 3. Intimations. Chapter Two: Philosophy Begins with Doubt. 1. Is the First Thesis Identical with Thesis Three? 2. How Does the Individual Relate to the First Thesis? (a) How Does an Individual who Affirms the First Thesis Relate to It? (b) How Does the Individual to Whom the First Thesis is Proposed Relate to the Individual who Propounds It? Chapter Three: In Order to Philosophise One Must Have Doubted. Part Two, In Which Johannes Tries to Think Propriis Auspiciis (On His Own Account) De Omnibus Dubitandum Est. Introduction. Chapter One: What Is It To Doubt?. 1. How Must Existence be Constituted in Order for Doubt to be Possible? Kierkegaard's Works and their Authors. Bibliography. Glossary. Index.
- Publisher

The anthology makes use of a range of classic translations, and includes new translations by Jane Chamberlain and Jonathan RUe, explanatory introductions, an index and a glossary.
- Publisher

Meet the Authors

Jane Chamberlain (Ed)

Jonathan Ree is lecturer in Philosophy at Middlesex University.ýýJane Chamberlain is attached to the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Middlesex University.

Jonathan Ree (Ed)

Jonathan Ree is lecturer in Philosophy at Middlesex University.ýýJane Chamberlain is attached to the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Middlesex University.

Table Of Contents

  • 1. Reordering Society:reforming Education 1.1 Education And Politics In A
  • Changing Social Order. 1.2 From Consensus To Contestation In A Neutralist
  • Framework. 1.3 Education And Preferences
  • A Paradox? 1.4 The Re-forming Of Education. 1.5 Conclusion 2.
  • Reform:rhetoric,rationale And Representation. 2.1 Privatising The Public
  • Sphere: Rationale And Rhetoric. 2.2 The Virtues Of The Market. 2.3 A
  • Suitable Case For Treatment: Persuasion And Plausibility. 2.4 Conclusion.
  • 3. Educational "goods":value And Benefit. 3.1 Public Project: Private
  • Aspirations. 3.2 Conflicting Aspirations: Public Benefit And Private
  • Reward. 3.3 The Value Of Educational "goods". 3.4 Conclusion. 4. Rights
  • And Choices. 4.1 The Power Of "rights Talk". 4.2 Rights To Education:
  • Beneficiaries Of Education. 4.3 Parents' Rights And Consumer Rights. 4.4
  • The Good Of Each, Of All And Of None. 4.5 Conclusion. 5. Freedom And The
  • Individual 5.1 From Practice To Theory. 5.2 Liberty And Equality. 5.3 The
  • "two Concepts Of Liberty" Debate. 5.4 "thick" And "thin" Conceptions
  • Of Equality. 5.5 Liberty, Equality And Equity. 5.6 Conclusion. 6. The Self
  • And Its Preferences. 6.1 How "individual" Is Individual Freedom? 6.2
  • Individuals And Their Attributes: Talents And Abilities. 6.3
  • Understandings, Tastes And Values. 6.3 The Family, The State And The
  • Individual. 6.4 Autonomy And Individualism. 6.5 The Social Distribution Of
  • Freedom. 6.6 Conclusion. 7. Liberalism And Liberal Education. 7.1
  • Neo-liberalism And Education. 7.2 Liberal Education: Problems Of Theory
  • And Practice. 7.3 Liberal Theory Revisited. 7.4 Re-forming Education
  • Theory And Practice. 7.5 Conclusion.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 165269
  • Product Code 0631204687
  • EAN 9780631204688
  • Pages 416
  • Department Academic
  • Category Philosophy
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Blackwell Publishing
  • Publication Date Jun 2001
  • Dimensions 228 x 157 x 23 mm
  • Weight 0.564kg

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