Back to Top
Our Stores Contact Us Help
Welcome, {{username}} Log Out Log In   /  Sign Up

The Rise of Benedict Xvi

John L Allen (Jr)

The Rise of Benedict Xvi

John L Allen (Jr)

$27.99

Hardback
Praise for John L. Allen, Jr.'s, "Conclave "An invaluable primer . . . highly informative." --"Washington Post "Definitely a winner." --"Minneapolis Star Tribune "It's surprising how much you learn from this book . . . [Allen] explain[s] the process in an engaging way, and offers history, context and his own list of front-runners." --"Arizona Republic Praise for John L. Allen, Jr.'s, "All the Pope's Men "[A] superb book" --"Chicago Sun-Times "The "National Catholic Reporter's Vatican correspondent John L. Allen, Jr., unpacks several popular myths as well as the psychology, sociology, and theology that inform the Holy See's worldview. But "All the Pope's Men is not a polemic. It's a patient look at Vatican ways of thinking and acting." --"San Antonio Express-News "An exceedingly valuable book." --Fr. Richard John Neuhaus," First Things "By turns enlightening and highly amusing, the book deserves a wide readership." --"America " . . . this dispassionate book is the best written about the Vatican in a long time and belongs on the desk of every editor and religion writer in the English-speaking world." --Andrew Greeley, "National Catholic Reporter "An informative and readable look at Vatican structures, policies, and personalities . . . filled with useful data and engaging anecdotes." --"Crisis Magazine

- Publisher From the author of "Conclave" and "All the Pope's Men" comes the story of Pope John Paul II's last days, the behind-the-scenes dynamics within the College of Cardinals that led to the choice of Joseph Ratzinger as Pope Benedict XVI, and where the new pope is likely to lead the Catholic Church. ^On April 18, 2005, the College of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church gathered to elect a successor to Pope John Paul II. Faced with several potential candidates, the cardinals made a bold choice, entrusting the Keys of the Kingdom to 78-year-old Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany, a man whose views on the challenges facing the Church and the broader culture could not be more unambiguous, or controversial. ^Questions arose as the world watched while Ratzinger was installed as Pope Benedict XVI, the 266th pontiff of the Catholic Church. Why Ratzinger? Why someone so clearly identified with the previous pope? Why not a "compromise" choice? Why a Cardinal from Western Europe and not fro

- Publisher Chapter One THE FINAL DAYS OF JOHN PAUL II When Karol Wojtyla was elected to the Throne of Peter on October 16, 1978, the world was dazzled by his sheer physical force. He was, to invoke a tired expression, a "man's man"rugged, handsome, brimming with energy and self-conFidence. Fr. Andrew Greeley, the American novelist and sociologist, rightly observed that he looked like a linebacker in American football. Archbishop Michael Miller, today a senior Vatican ofFicial, who at the time of Wojtyla's election was a junior cleric in the Secretariat of State, said in a January 2005 reminiscence that from the moment John Paul II stepped out onto the central balcony of St. Peter's Basilica, "He simply dominated that space. He looked like he had been pope forever." In the press coverage from those early years, the Pope was dubbed "God's athlete." He skied, climbed mountains, swam, and had an undying passion for the outdoors. The story of his nomination to be a bishop in Poland, when he had to interrupt a camping trip in order to accept and then went immediately back to kayaking after he had signed the paperwork, became the stuff of legend. At the table, the Pope had the hearty appetite of a man who once worked in the Solvay salt quarry outside Krakow; he could wolf down a plate of Polish sausage and potatoes, and a glass of beer, with obvious gusto. Even when he was wearing his pontiFical vestments and saying Mass, he projected a raw physical energy. When he traveled, he kept up a brutal schedule that left his aides, as well as the journalists who traveled with him, exhausted. It seemed that he chafed against the very limits of time and space, so brimming was he with determination and drive. In 1979, for example, he took a nine-day trip to the United States and Ireland, and over the course of that time he delivered a staggering seventy-six speeches, which works out to roughly eight and a half speeches per day. Oral tradition in the press corps that followed the Pope has it that at one point, exhausted reporters tossed a message up to the front section of the papal plane asking for a day off, which produced a smile from John Paul II, as if to say, "I dare you to keep up." This was a pope who understood the virtue of keeping in shape. Upon his election, he ordered a swimming pool installed at Castel Gandolfo, the pope's summer residence outside Rome. When some in the Roman Curia, the papal bureaucracy, objected to the expense, he replied, "It's cheaper than holding another conclave." Coming fast on the death of his predecessor, Pope John Paul I, after just thirty-three days, his point was well taken. John Paul II's astounding drive did not, of course, come just from his physical strength. He also had a deep, unwavering conFidence in divine providence, that God would not send him any burden that was not accompanied by the strength to bear it, and that everything that happened to him was according to cosmic design. It was his Firm belief, for example, that on May 13, 1981, the Virgin Mary altered the ight path of would-be assassin Mohammed Ali Agca's bullet in order to save his life and prolong his papacy. May 13 is the Feast Day of Our Lady of Fatima, and on the First anniversary of the assassination attempt, John Paul II traveled to Fatima in Portugal in order to lay the bullet that doctors had removed from his body before the statue of the Virgin, thanking her for coming to his aide. The motto of his pontiFicate wasTotus tuus, "totally yours," meaning that he had offered it to the Virgin Mary, and now he believed she had returned the favor. It was in part that belief in providence that all

- Publisher

You May Also Be Interested In

About "The Rise of Benedict Xvi"

Praise for John L. Allen, Jr.'s, "Conclave "An invaluable primer . . . highly informative." --"Washington Post "Definitely a winner." --"Minneapolis Star Tribune "It's surprising how much you learn from this book . . . [Allen] explain[s] the process in an engaging way, and offers history, context and his own list of front-runners." --"Arizona Republic Praise for John L. Allen, Jr.'s, "All the Pope's Men "[A] superb book" --"Chicago Sun-Times "The "National Catholic Reporter's Vatican correspondent John L. Allen, Jr., unpacks several popular myths as well as the psychology, sociology, and theology that inform the Holy See's worldview. But "All the Pope's Men is not a polemic. It's a patient look at Vatican ways of thinking and acting." --"San Antonio Express-News "An exceedingly valuable book." --Fr. Richard John Neuhaus," First Things "By turns enlightening and highly amusing, the book deserves a wide readership." --"America " . . . this dispassionate book is the best written about the Vatican in a long time and belongs on the desk of every editor and religion writer in the English-speaking world." --Andrew Greeley, "National Catholic Reporter "An informative and readable look at Vatican structures, policies, and personalities . . . filled with useful data and engaging anecdotes." --"Crisis Magazine
- Publisher

From the author of "Conclave" and "All the Pope's Men" comes the story of Pope John Paul II's last days, the behind-the-scenes dynamics within the College of Cardinals that led to the choice of Joseph Ratzinger as Pope Benedict XVI, and where the new pope is likely to lead the Catholic Church. ^On April 18, 2005, the College of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church gathered to elect a successor to Pope John Paul II. Faced with several potential candidates, the cardinals made a bold choice, entrusting the Keys of the Kingdom to 78-year-old Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany, a man whose views on the challenges facing the Church and the broader culture could not be more unambiguous, or controversial. ^Questions arose as the world watched while Ratzinger was installed as Pope Benedict XVI, the 266th pontiff of the Catholic Church. Why Ratzinger? Why someone so clearly identified with the previous pope? Why not a "compromise" choice? Why a Cardinal from Western Europe and not fro
- Publisher

Chapter One THE FINAL DAYS OF JOHN PAUL II When Karol Wojtyla was elected to the Throne of Peter on October 16, 1978, the world was dazzled by his sheer physical force. He was, to invoke a tired expression, a "man's man"rugged, handsome, brimming with energy and self-conFidence. Fr. Andrew Greeley, the American novelist and sociologist, rightly observed that he looked like a linebacker in American football. Archbishop Michael Miller, today a senior Vatican ofFicial, who at the time of Wojtyla's election was a junior cleric in the Secretariat of State, said in a January 2005 reminiscence that from the moment John Paul II stepped out onto the central balcony of St. Peter's Basilica, "He simply dominated that space. He looked like he had been pope forever." In the press coverage from those early years, the Pope was dubbed "God's athlete." He skied, climbed mountains, swam, and had an undying passion for the outdoors. The story of his nomination to be a bishop in Poland, when he had to interrupt a camping trip in order to accept and then went immediately back to kayaking after he had signed the paperwork, became the stuff of legend. At the table, the Pope had the hearty appetite of a man who once worked in the Solvay salt quarry outside Krakow; he could wolf down a plate of Polish sausage and potatoes, and a glass of beer, with obvious gusto. Even when he was wearing his pontiFical vestments and saying Mass, he projected a raw physical energy. When he traveled, he kept up a brutal schedule that left his aides, as well as the journalists who traveled with him, exhausted. It seemed that he chafed against the very limits of time and space, so brimming was he with determination and drive. In 1979, for example, he took a nine-day trip to the United States and Ireland, and over the course of that time he delivered a staggering seventy-six speeches, which works out to roughly eight and a half speeches per day. Oral tradition in the press corps that followed the Pope has it that at one point, exhausted reporters tossed a message up to the front section of the papal plane asking for a day off, which produced a smile from John Paul II, as if to say, "I dare you to keep up." This was a pope who understood the virtue of keeping in shape. Upon his election, he ordered a swimming pool installed at Castel Gandolfo, the pope's summer residence outside Rome. When some in the Roman Curia, the papal bureaucracy, objected to the expense, he replied, "It's cheaper than holding another conclave." Coming fast on the death of his predecessor, Pope John Paul I, after just thirty-three days, his point was well taken. John Paul II's astounding drive did not, of course, come just from his physical strength. He also had a deep, unwavering conFidence in divine providence, that God would not send him any burden that was not accompanied by the strength to bear it, and that everything that happened to him was according to cosmic design. It was his Firm belief, for example, that on May 13, 1981, the Virgin Mary altered the ight path of would-be assassin Mohammed Ali Agca's bullet in order to save his life and prolong his papacy. May 13 is the Feast Day of Our Lady of Fatima, and on the First anniversary of the assassination attempt, John Paul II traveled to Fatima in Portugal in order to lay the bullet that doctors had removed from his body before the statue of the Virgin, thanking her for coming to his aide. The motto of his pontiFicate wasTotus tuus, "totally yours," meaning that he had offered it to the Virgin Mary, and now he believed she had returned the favor. It was in part that belief in providence that all
- Publisher

Meet the Author

John L Allen (Jr)

JOHN L. ALLEN, Jr., is the Vatican correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter and a Vatican analyst for CNN and National Public Radio. His weekly Internet column, The Word from Rome, is widely considered the best source of insights into Vatican affairs in the English language. He is the author of popular Catholic titles: Pope Benedict XVI; All The Pope's Conclave; Opus Dei; The Rise Of Benedict XVI, and All The Pope's Men.

Order now to secure your copy when our stock arrives.

0 Available. Expected to ship in 5 to 6 weeks from Australia.
Quantity

Add to Wishlist

Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 237331
  • Product Code 0385513208
  • EAN 9780385513203
  • Pages 249
  • Department Academic
  • Category Christian Worldview
  • Sub-Category World Events
  • Publisher Doubleday
  • Publication Date Jun 2005
  • Dimensions 242 x 164 x 25 mm
  • Weight 0.508kg

Bestsellers in Christian Worldview