Back to Top
Our Stores Contact Us Help
Welcome, {{username}} Log Out Log In   /  Sign Up

Transformations in Ancient Judaism

Jacob Neusner

Transformations in Ancient Judaism

Jacob Neusner

$42.99

Hardback
192 Pages

- Publisher "The Jewish people endured three crises during the formation of what would become the Jewish canon, and these significantly shaped their religion. The destruction of Solomon's Temple by Nebuchadnezzar in 586 B.C.E., the destruction of Herod's Temple by the Romans in 70 C.E., and the acceptance of Christianity as the state religion of Rome in 363 C.E. each signaled the apparent end of Jewish religion. Instead of succumbing to defeat and despair, Judaism arose, transformed and strengthened, from each crisis as a result of its religious leaders' reinterpretation of its sacred texts." "In Transformations, Jacob Neusner reasons that the Jewish canonical writings - the Hebrew Bible, Mishnah, Talmuds, and Midrash - illustrate Judaism's response to these three social, cultural, and political crises. Faced with these catastrophic events, the Rabbinic sages explored anew the paradigms of piety and practice which they had received from previous generations. The result was that they discovered a truth both continuous with the past and responsive to the unanticipated crisis - a truth that carved out a path for the future. This process, represented in the Jewish canon, continues to define modern Judaism. Jacob Neusner's thesis is this: When faced with defeat, Judaism reaches a turning point and, in an act of stubborn affirmation, Judaism is transformed."--BOOK JACKET.

- Publisher The Judaism that is defined by its canonical writings (the Hebrew Bible, Mishnah, Talmuds, and Midrash) tells the story of how hope overcomes despair. Neusner explores the way rabbinic Judaism has responded to social, cultural, and political crises by rethinking historical, received paradigms of piety and practice--and finding in them relevant, useful truth for the current situation. When faced with acute and catastrophic events, the Rabbinic sages explored anew the received paradigms and truth of their faith and discovered in them truth that is both continuous with the past and responsive to the contemporary unanticipated crisis. Neusner offers a broad thesis, theological at its core: when defeat turns to despair, Judaism comes to a turning point. And with the response to despair, in an act of stubborn affirmation, Judaism is transformed.

- Publisher

You May Also Be Interested In

About "Transformations in Ancient Judaism"

192 Pages
- Publisher

"The Jewish people endured three crises during the formation of what would become the Jewish canon, and these significantly shaped their religion. The destruction of Solomon's Temple by Nebuchadnezzar in 586 B.C.E., the destruction of Herod's Temple by the Romans in 70 C.E., and the acceptance of Christianity as the state religion of Rome in 363 C.E. each signaled the apparent end of Jewish religion. Instead of succumbing to defeat and despair, Judaism arose, transformed and strengthened, from each crisis as a result of its religious leaders' reinterpretation of its sacred texts." "In Transformations, Jacob Neusner reasons that the Jewish canonical writings - the Hebrew Bible, Mishnah, Talmuds, and Midrash - illustrate Judaism's response to these three social, cultural, and political crises. Faced with these catastrophic events, the Rabbinic sages explored anew the paradigms of piety and practice which they had received from previous generations. The result was that they discovered a truth both continuous with the past and responsive to the unanticipated crisis - a truth that carved out a path for the future. This process, represented in the Jewish canon, continues to define modern Judaism. Jacob Neusner's thesis is this: When faced with defeat, Judaism reaches a turning point and, in an act of stubborn affirmation, Judaism is transformed."--BOOK JACKET.
- Publisher

The Judaism that is defined by its canonical writings (the Hebrew Bible, Mishnah, Talmuds, and Midrash) tells the story of how hope overcomes despair. Neusner explores the way rabbinic Judaism has responded to social, cultural, and political crises by rethinking historical, received paradigms of piety and practice--and finding in them relevant, useful truth for the current situation. When faced with acute and catastrophic events, the Rabbinic sages explored anew the received paradigms and truth of their faith and discovered in them truth that is both continuous with the past and responsive to the contemporary unanticipated crisis. Neusner offers a broad thesis, theological at its core: when defeat turns to despair, Judaism comes to a turning point. And with the response to despair, in an act of stubborn affirmation, Judaism is transformed.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Jacob Neusner

Jacob Neusner (Ph.D., Columbia University) is Distinguished Service Professor of the History and Theology of Judaism; Bard Center Fellow. He is the Editor of the three volume Encyclopedia of Judaism, he has published more than one thousand books and innumerable articles, including Theology of the Oral Torah, Theology of the Halakhah, and The Incarnation of God: The Character of Divinity in Formative Judaism.
Koorong -Editorial Review.

Unavailable. Out of Print. Only available while stock lasts.

Out of Print
Quantity

Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 228995
  • Product Code 1565637054
  • EAN 9781565637054
  • Pages 190
  • Department Academic
  • Category Biblical Studies
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Hendrickson Publishers
  • Publication Date Nov 2004
  • Dimensions 236 x 163 x 19 mm
  • Weight 0.472kg

Bestsellers in Biblical Studies