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Trial and Error

E Larson
Trial and Error

Trial and Error

E Larson

$17.50

Paperback
The debate over teaching evolution in the public schools remains oneof the most emotionally-charged controversies in twentieth-century America. Nowavailable in a revised and updated edition, Edward J. Larson's highly-acclaimedstudy--which ranges from before the Scopes trial of 1925 to the creationismdisputes of the 1980s--offers the first comprehensive account of the educationaland legal battles erupting from this persistent confrontation.Larson traces the origins of the dispute back to the late nineteenthcentury, a period marked by the scientific acceptance of evolution, the rise ofa distinct fundamentalist branch within Protestant Christianity, and the spreadof public secondary education. He argues that the ever-increasing interactionbetween these factors led to a series of legal confrontations, all of the samenature, from the 1920s to the present day.Analyzing the developments in teaching evolution and the statutes andcourt cases spawned by them, Larson concludes that public science education hasnever deviated too far from public opinion. Thus, strong regional opposition inthe 1920s to Darwinism resulted in bans on evolutionary teaching, while theSupreme Court's overturning of those bans in 1968 came only when wider popularacceptance of the theory of evolution had occurred. While finding thatlegislators have responded more readily to public opinion than judges, Larsonreveals that even the courts have operated within the boundaries set by publicsentiment and have generally refused to rule on the scientific merits of eitherside's argument.Lucid and provocative, this study offers a much-needed historicalperspective on a debate that has resisted a final resolution for more than halfa century. This edition contains a new chapter which treats the ramificationsof the controversy in the 1980s.

- Publisher "Admirable, non-partisan discussion of the issues at hand. Makes the legal disputes over teaching evaluation clear even to those with a limited background in American history and law. I would recommend it for any course on the relationship of science and religion, or science and government/society."--A. Bowdoin Van Riper, Northwestern University "The book is a useful, well-documented account of the roles played by lawyers, legislators, and judges in the controversy. . . " Reviews in Anthropology Praise for the first edition: "In this absorbing and well-researched book, Edward Larson analyzes [his subject] with clarity and control. He ably illuminates the legal and constitutional issues that the controversy has raised, yet he is admirably aware that what transpires in statehouses and law courts usually reflects larger social forces....[A] thoughtful and arresting book."--Daniel J. Kevles, The New Republic "[A] thoughtful and arresting book."--Daniel J. Kevles, The New Republic "Tightly written and often persuasively argued....An important book, and as such is likely to provoke strong reactions."--Georgia Historical Quarterly "Lucidly written and abundantly documented....Brilliantly illuminates the numerous legal arguments involved in this controversy over evolution, the historical developments which produced it, and the sociological factors which perpetuate it."--Pennsylvania History "The ultimate arena in the battle between evolutionists and public opinion remains the courtroom, and lawyer/science historian Larson traces this American conflict exhaustively....Always well-balanced and well-documented, Larson analyzes the legal underpinnings of the battle skillfully."--Kirkus Reviews "A concise and clearly written history of the struggle between evolution and creationism."--Los Angeles Times Book Review "One of the finest contributions to the literature....An exciting and well-written book that deserves your attention."--The Science Teacher

- Publisher The debate over teaching evolution in the public schools remains one of the most emotionally-charged controversies in twentieth-century America. Now available in a revised and updated edition, Edward J. Larson's highly-acclaimed study--which ranges from before the Scopes trial of 1925 to the creationism disputes of the 1980s--offers the first comprehensive account of the educational and legal battles erupting from this persistent confrontation.^ Larson traces the origins of the dispute back to the late nineteenth century, a period marked by the scientific acceptance of evolution, the rise of a distinct fundamentalist branch within Protestant Christianity, and the spread of public secondary education. He argues that the ever-increasing interaction between these factors led to a series of legal confrontations, all of the same nature, from the 1920s to the present day.^ Analyzing the developments in teaching evolution and the statutes and court cases spawned by them, Larson conclud

- Publisher

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About "Trial and Error"

The debate over teaching evolution in the public schools remains oneof the most emotionally-charged controversies in twentieth-century America. Nowavailable in a revised and updated edition, Edward J. Larson's highly-acclaimedstudy--which ranges from before the Scopes trial of 1925 to the creationismdisputes of the 1980s--offers the first comprehensive account of the educationaland legal battles erupting from this persistent confrontation.Larson traces the origins of the dispute back to the late nineteenthcentury, a period marked by the scientific acceptance of evolution, the rise ofa distinct fundamentalist branch within Protestant Christianity, and the spreadof public secondary education. He argues that the ever-increasing interactionbetween these factors led to a series of legal confrontations, all of the samenature, from the 1920s to the present day.Analyzing the developments in teaching evolution and the statutes andcourt cases spawned by them, Larson concludes that public science education hasnever deviated too far from public opinion. Thus, strong regional opposition inthe 1920s to Darwinism resulted in bans on evolutionary teaching, while theSupreme Court's overturning of those bans in 1968 came only when wider popularacceptance of the theory of evolution had occurred. While finding thatlegislators have responded more readily to public opinion than judges, Larsonreveals that even the courts have operated within the boundaries set by publicsentiment and have generally refused to rule on the scientific merits of eitherside's argument.Lucid and provocative, this study offers a much-needed historicalperspective on a debate that has resisted a final resolution for more than halfa century. This edition contains a new chapter which treats the ramificationsof the controversy in the 1980s.
- Publisher

"Admirable, non-partisan discussion of the issues at hand. Makes the legal disputes over teaching evaluation clear even to those with a limited background in American history and law. I would recommend it for any course on the relationship of science and religion, or science and government/society."--A. Bowdoin Van Riper, Northwestern University "The book is a useful, well-documented account of the roles played by lawyers, legislators, and judges in the controversy. . . " Reviews in Anthropology Praise for the first edition: "In this absorbing and well-researched book, Edward Larson analyzes [his subject] with clarity and control. He ably illuminates the legal and constitutional issues that the controversy has raised, yet he is admirably aware that what transpires in statehouses and law courts usually reflects larger social forces....[A] thoughtful and arresting book."--Daniel J. Kevles, The New Republic "[A] thoughtful and arresting book."--Daniel J. Kevles, The New Republic "Tightly written and often persuasively argued....An important book, and as such is likely to provoke strong reactions."--Georgia Historical Quarterly "Lucidly written and abundantly documented....Brilliantly illuminates the numerous legal arguments involved in this controversy over evolution, the historical developments which produced it, and the sociological factors which perpetuate it."--Pennsylvania History "The ultimate arena in the battle between evolutionists and public opinion remains the courtroom, and lawyer/science historian Larson traces this American conflict exhaustively....Always well-balanced and well-documented, Larson analyzes the legal underpinnings of the battle skillfully."--Kirkus Reviews "A concise and clearly written history of the struggle between evolution and creationism."--Los Angeles Times Book Review "One of the finest contributions to the literature....An exciting and well-written book that deserves your attention."--The Science Teacher
- Publisher

The debate over teaching evolution in the public schools remains one of the most emotionally-charged controversies in twentieth-century America. Now available in a revised and updated edition, Edward J. Larson's highly-acclaimed study--which ranges from before the Scopes trial of 1925 to the creationism disputes of the 1980s--offers the first comprehensive account of the educational and legal battles erupting from this persistent confrontation.^ Larson traces the origins of the dispute back to the late nineteenth century, a period marked by the scientific acceptance of evolution, the rise of a distinct fundamentalist branch within Protestant Christianity, and the spread of public secondary education. He argues that the ever-increasing interaction between these factors led to a series of legal confrontations, all of the same nature, from the 1920s to the present day.^ Analyzing the developments in teaching evolution and the statutes and court cases spawned by them, Larson conclud
- Publisher

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 23027
  • Product Code 0195061438
  • EAN 9780195061437
  • Pages 254
  • Department Academic
  • Category Science
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Oxford University Press
  • Publication Date Dec 1989
  • Dimensions 203 x 137 x 13 mm
  • Weight 0.230kg

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