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When Did I Begin?

N Ford

When Did I Begin?

N Ford

$120.00

Paperback
When Did I Begin? investigates the theoretical, moral and biological issues surrounding the debate over the beginning of human life. With the continuing controversy over the use of in vitro fertilization techniques and experimentation with human embryos, these issues have been forced into the arena of public debate. The answer to the question, 'When did I begin?' draws on both scientific evidence, and on the philosophical concepts of the presence of the human individaul. As a leading theologian and moral philosopher, thoroughly conversant with modern embryology, Norman Ford, a Salesian priest, is well qualified to bridge the gap between the biological and philosophical point of view. Dr Ford argues that a human individual could not begin before definitive individuation occurs with the appearance of the primative streak about two weeks after fertilisation. While he does not specifically address any moral issues regarding the treatment of human embryos, the author views reading of this book as an essential prerequisite for such moral considerations.;The implications of Dr Ford's answer to the question posed in the title will be crucially important for fully evaluating such problems as embryo experimentation and contraception, for a range of readers from embryologists and physicians to moral philosophers and theologians. The book has already stimulated considerable interest and debate, and is now available in paperback for the first time.

- Publisher 'When Did I Begin? is, without doubt, a most important contribution to the determination of the moment at which the human individual begins ... accessible to anyone wishing to take an intelligent interest in its subject.' John Keefe, Month

- Publisher When Did I Begin? investigates the theoretical, moral, and biological issues surrounding the debate over the beginning of human life. With the continuing controversy over the use of in vitro fertilization techniques and experimentation with human embryos, these issues have been forced into the arena of public debate. Following a detailed analysis of the history of the question, Reverend Ford argues that a human individual could not begin before definitive individuation occurs with the appearance of the primitive streak about two weeks after fertilization. This, he argues, is when it becomes finally known whether one or more human individuals are to form from a single egg. Thus, he questions the idea that the fertilized egg itself could be regarded as the beginning of the development of the human individual. The author also differs sharply, however, from those who would delay the beginning of the human person until the brain is formed, or until birth or the onset of conscious states.

- Publisher

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About "When Did I Begin?"

When Did I Begin? investigates the theoretical, moral and biological issues surrounding the debate over the beginning of human life. With the continuing controversy over the use of in vitro fertilization techniques and experimentation with human embryos, these issues have been forced into the arena of public debate. The answer to the question, 'When did I begin?' draws on both scientific evidence, and on the philosophical concepts of the presence of the human individaul. As a leading theologian and moral philosopher, thoroughly conversant with modern embryology, Norman Ford, a Salesian priest, is well qualified to bridge the gap between the biological and philosophical point of view. Dr Ford argues that a human individual could not begin before definitive individuation occurs with the appearance of the primative streak about two weeks after fertilisation. While he does not specifically address any moral issues regarding the treatment of human embryos, the author views reading of this book as an essential prerequisite for such moral considerations.;The implications of Dr Ford's answer to the question posed in the title will be crucially important for fully evaluating such problems as embryo experimentation and contraception, for a range of readers from embryologists and physicians to moral philosophers and theologians. The book has already stimulated considerable interest and debate, and is now available in paperback for the first time.
- Publisher

'When Did I Begin? is, without doubt, a most important contribution to the determination of the moment at which the human individual begins ... accessible to anyone wishing to take an intelligent interest in its subject.' John Keefe, Month
- Publisher

When Did I Begin? investigates the theoretical, moral, and biological issues surrounding the debate over the beginning of human life. With the continuing controversy over the use of in vitro fertilization techniques and experimentation with human embryos, these issues have been forced into the arena of public debate. Following a detailed analysis of the history of the question, Reverend Ford argues that a human individual could not begin before definitive individuation occurs with the appearance of the primitive streak about two weeks after fertilization. This, he argues, is when it becomes finally known whether one or more human individuals are to form from a single egg. Thus, he questions the idea that the fertilized egg itself could be regarded as the beginning of the development of the human individual. The author also differs sharply, however, from those who would delay the beginning of the human person until the brain is formed, or until birth or the onset of conscious states.
- Publisher

Table Of Contents

  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Historical Influence Of Aristotle On The Theory Of Human Reproduction
  • 3. Criteria For Being A Human Individual
  • 4. Fertilization And The Beginning Of A Human Individual
  • 5. Implantation And The Beginning Of The Human Individual
  • 6. The Human Individual Begins After Implantation
  • Appendixes
  • Notes
  • Glossary
  • Index.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 111179
  • Product Code 0521424283
  • EAN 9780521424288
  • Pages 240
  • Department Academic
  • Category Christian Worldview
  • Sub-Category Medical/science
  • Publisher Cambridge University Uk
  • Publication Date Nov 1991
  • Dimensions 226 x 150 x 12 mm
  • Weight 0.344kg

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