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Why We Live in Community

Eberhard ArnoldThomas Merton

Why We Live in Community

Eberhard ArnoldThomas Merton

$15.99

Paperback
88 Pages

- Publisher Everyone these days seems to be searching for community in one way or another - whether in the form of committed, nourishing relationships at home and at work, support networks, small groups, house churches - even cyberspace. But mention 'community' and many people literally go blank. They claim that they're not ready for the commitment such a term implies, or lack sufficient energy, gifts, or time. It's just not 'where they're at.' Or is it? This new translation of a time-honoured manifesto adds a fresh, engaging voice to the vital discussion of what real community is all about* love, joy, unity, and the great adventure of faith shared with others along the way. Neither Arnold nor Merton describe (or prescribe) community here, but for the individual seeker, they do provide a vision to guide and inspire the search, and for those who may have already answered the call to community, they offer the disarming challenge of greater commitment and a continually deepened faith.

- Publisher Everyone's talking about community these days. Arnold and Merton suggest it can be lived, too.In this time-honored manifesto, Arnold and Merton add their voices to the vital discussion of what real community is all about: love, joy, unity, and the "geat adventure of faith" shared with others along the way. Neither writer describes (or prescribes) community here, but they do provide a vision to guide our search.

- Publisher

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About "Why We Live in Community"

88 Pages
- Publisher

Everyone these days seems to be searching for community in one way or another - whether in the form of committed, nourishing relationships at home and at work, support networks, small groups, house churches - even cyberspace. But mention 'community' and many people literally go blank. They claim that they're not ready for the commitment such a term implies, or lack sufficient energy, gifts, or time. It's just not 'where they're at.' Or is it? This new translation of a time-honoured manifesto adds a fresh, engaging voice to the vital discussion of what real community is all about* love, joy, unity, and the great adventure of faith shared with others along the way. Neither Arnold nor Merton describe (or prescribe) community here, but for the individual seeker, they do provide a vision to guide and inspire the search, and for those who may have already answered the call to community, they offer the disarming challenge of greater commitment and a continually deepened faith.
- Publisher

Everyone's talking about community these days. Arnold and Merton suggest it can be lived, too.In this time-honored manifesto, Arnold and Merton add their voices to the vital discussion of what real community is all about: love, joy, unity, and the "geat adventure of faith" shared with others along the way. Neither writer describes (or prescribes) community here, but they do provide a vision to guide our search.
- Publisher

Meet the Authors

Eberhard Arnold

Arnold, pastor and social revolutionary, organic farmer and maverick theologian, was widely sought as a public speaker in his native Germany before and after World War I, and influenced thousands during his lifetime.

Thomas Merton

Born in France, Thomas Merton was the son of an American artist and poet and her New Zealander husband, a painter. Merton lost both parents before he had finished high school, and his younger brother was killed in World War II. Something of the ephemeral character of human endeavor marked all his works, deepening the pathos of his writings and drawing him close to Eastern, especially Buddhist, forms of monasticism. After an initial education in the United States, France, and England, he entered Gethsemani Abbey in Kentucky, where he remained until a short time before his death.

His working life was spent as a Trappist monk. At Gethsemani, he wrote his famous autobiography, The Seven Storey Mountain (1948); there he labored and prayed through the days and years of a constant regimen that began with daily prayer at 2:00 a.m. As his contemplative life developed, he still maintained contact with the outside world, his many books and articles increasing steadily as the years went by. Reading them, it is hard to think of him as only a "guilty bystander," to use the title of one of his many collections of essays. He was vehement in his opposition to the Vietnam War, to the nuclear arms race, to racial oppression. Having received permission to leave his monastery, he went on a journey to confer with mystics of the Hindu and Buddhist traditions. He was accidentally electrocuted in a hotel in Bangkok, Thailand, on December 10, 1968.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 158972
  • Product Code 0874860687
  • EAN 9780874860689
  • Pages 88
  • Department General Books
  • Category Spiritual Growth
  • Sub-Category General
  • Publisher Plough Publishing House
  • Publication Date May 1995
  • Dimensions 178 x 127 x 7 mm
  • Weight 0.113kg

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