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Wisdom in Theology

Ronald E Clements

Wisdom in Theology

Ronald E Clements

$55.00

Paperback

Rather than being content with atomistic approaches to a text, recent scholarship has increasingly seen the value of tracing motifs and their variations as they run through biblical books, and even across book boundaries. Williamson takes up the important but inadequately explored messianic theme, tracing its development and variations through the canonical Isaiah. He sets this unifying thematic study against a counterpoint of redactional analysis, which exploits and builds on his previous work in The Book Called Isaiah: Deutero-Isaiah's Role in Composition and Redaction (1994). The current work was composed to serve as the source material for the 1997 Didsbury Lectures at the ^Nazarene Theological College near Manchester, England.

In his introductory chapter, Williamson sets the foundation of his theme against the broader backdrop of the king, which moves from the minor tones of the human, Davidic king in the earlier chapters of Isaiah to the major key of the divine king later in the book. He goes against much recent scholarship in holding that the former derive most probably from before the exile.

The second variation concerns Immanuel, looking in detail at chapters 6-9. He presents and critiques Buddes' century-old hypothesis that Isaiah 6-8 were an Isaianic Memoir which originally opened the book. Rather than taking the call narratives of other prophets as a comparison, Williamson finds closer parallels between the calls of Isaiah and of Micaiah (1 Kgs 22) and the literary shape of Amos 7-8. He sees the chief interest in the Immanuel figure being in fulfilling the role of righteous rule within the Davidic dynasty, rather than in identifying any specific individual.

The third variation, the "Servant" is drawn from Deutero-Isaiah. There the original Davidic relationship with God is transferred to the nation of Israel. She will be God's witness and mediator to the world. As a Christian, Williamson brings up the interpretation that Jesus is the servant according to the NT. He defends his view by stating that "Jesus fulfills, but does not thereby exhaust, the prophecy" (p. 53). The theme of justice and righteousness in association with the servant ties his role to that of the king in the first section.
-Publisher.

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About "Wisdom in Theology"

Rather than being content with atomistic approaches to a text, recent scholarship has increasingly seen the value of tracing motifs and their variations as they run through biblical books, and even across book boundaries. Williamson takes up the important but inadequately explored messianic theme, tracing its development and variations through the canonical Isaiah. He sets this unifying thematic study against a counterpoint of redactional analysis, which exploits and builds on his previous work in The Book Called Isaiah: Deutero-Isaiah's Role in Composition and Redaction (1994). The current work was composed to serve as the source material for the 1997 Didsbury Lectures at the ^Nazarene Theological College near Manchester, England.

In his introductory chapter, Williamson sets the foundation of his theme against the broader backdrop of the king, which moves from the minor tones of the human, Davidic king in the earlier chapters of Isaiah to the major key of the divine king later in the book. He goes against much recent scholarship in holding that the former derive most probably from before the exile.

The second variation concerns Immanuel, looking in detail at chapters 6-9. He presents and critiques Buddes' century-old hypothesis that Isaiah 6-8 were an Isaianic Memoir which originally opened the book. Rather than taking the call narratives of other prophets as a comparison, Williamson finds closer parallels between the calls of Isaiah and of Micaiah (1 Kgs 22) and the literary shape of Amos 7-8. He sees the chief interest in the Immanuel figure being in fulfilling the role of righteous rule within the Davidic dynasty, rather than in identifying any specific individual.

The third variation, the "Servant" is drawn from Deutero-Isaiah. There the original Davidic relationship with God is transferred to the nation of Israel. She will be God's witness and mediator to the world. As a Christian, Williamson brings up the interpretation that Jesus is the servant according to the NT. He defends his view by stating that "Jesus fulfills, but does not thereby exhaust, the prophecy" (p. 53). The theme of justice and righteousness in association with the servant ties his role to that of the king in the first section.
-Publisher.


- Koorong

It is plain even from Pauls own writings that other presentations of the Christian message than his own were current during his apostolic career. With some of these other presentations he is quite happy; against others he found it necessary to put his readers on their guard.In these four studies originally presented as the inaugural series of Didsbury Lectures at the British Isles Nazarene College Manchester F.F. Bruce discusses what we know about the history of nonPauline Christianity in the first century. Judiciously drawing upon material from the whole of the New Testament he relates it to other early Christian literature in order to provide a highly readable outline of an important area.But as he warns this book does not study the literature for its own sake. Instead it focuses on the leaders of early nonPauline Christianity with their associates from whom the literature provides indispensable evidence.The topics covered areChapter 1 Peter and the ElevenChapter 2 Stephen and Other
- Publisher

In this book, respected Old Testament scholar Ronald Clements explores and elucidates a much-debated subject a the place and significance of the Old Testament wisdom writings in Jewish and Christian theology. Based on the Didsbury Lectures delivered by Clements at British Isles Nazarene College in October 1989, 'Wisdom in Theology' first looks at the wisdom tradition in terms of its ancient Near Eastern background, it distinctiveness in Israelite life, and its historical development. Clements then discusses major wisdom themes under various headings: (1) wisdom and the world, (2) wisdom and health, (3) wisdom and politics, (4) wisdom and the household, and (5) wisdom and the divine realm. In explicating the unique role of the wisdom tradition, particularly in post-exilic Israel, Clements shows how wisdom, as opposed to the torah and prophecy, provided the Jews of the dispersion with the basis for a new, noncultic, universalistic worldview. Clements's scholarly discussion demonstrates to modern readers how much is yet to be learned regarding the inheritance of wisdom from the ancient world.
- Publisher

Meet the Author

Ronald E Clements

Dr. Ronald Clements moved with his wife, Anne, and young daughters to China in 1986, where he lectured in civil engineering at a university in Fujian Province until 1996. Ronald is now a full-time writer and researcher in Britain.

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Product Details

Product Details
  • Catalogue Code 246017
  • Product Code 1842274465
  • EAN 9781842274460
  • Pages 254
  • Department Academic
  • Category Biblical Studies
  • Sub-Category Old Testament
  • Publisher Paternoster
  • Publication Date Jan 2006
  • Dimensions 229 x 152 x 10 mm
  • Weight 0.292kg

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